Search This Blog

Loading...

Rifle Regiments - officer sketches


This is a work in progress based on my curiosity about the more obscure individual riflemen as found on the open web. It is not intended to be an all inclusive or definitive listing etc. See John Fredriksen's Green Coats and Glory and other websites for well-written profiles and sketches of the "better known" Rifle officers: T A SMITH, BENJAMIN FORSYTH, DANIEL APPLING, BENNET RILEY et. al. and mention of other field and junior officers involved in the numerous combat actions of the Rifle Regiments during the War of 1812. Some key Rifle luminaries:


General Thomas Adams Smith - Smith, Thomas Adams (1781-1844), Papers, 1798-1864 (C1029)
Benjamin_Forsyth
Benjamin_Forsyth
Daniel Appling
Daniel Appling - Georgia
Bennett C. Riley
Chronicles of Oklahoma Volume 19, No. 3, September, 1941, GENERAL BENNET RILEY, Commandant at Fort Gibson and Governor of California by Carolyn Thomas Foreman


Numerous, references to riflemen officers circa 1810, both original and later (Col. William Smyth, Captains: Armo(u)r, Atkinson, James Gibson, Hays, W. S. Hamilton, Johnson/Johnston, McDonald, Ragan ), are to be found in Memoirs of my own times,Vol II, by James Wilkinson,printed by Abraham Small., 1816
http://books.google.com/books?id=_U4FAAAAYAAJ&printsec=frontcover
A rare glimpse of the postwar Rifle Regiment officer corps in 1819 is found in the google available article: Report Of Inspection Of The Ninth Military Department, 1819 pp. 261-274 - Mississippi Valley Historical Association, 1921 (also a post here at MMHRI)

My methodology: 
In short, no "standard" approach exists (as will appear obvious); that is outside of an initial officer record citation provided as found and translated from the various Registers, Dictionaries and Lists of officers. 
The standard officer duty listings are found at the following indispensable references;

A Compilation of Registers of the Army of the United States, from 1815 to 1837...by William A. Gordon, 1837
http://books.google.com/books?id=XIcFAAAAMAAJ&printsec=frontcover

A Dictionary of All Officers, who Have Been Commissioned,...1789-1859, by Charles Kitchell Gardner - United States - 1853
http://books.google.com/books?id=GJNLAAAAMAAJ&printsec=frontcover

List of officers of the army of the United States from 1779 to 1900, by William Henry Powell, 1900
http://books.google.com/books?id=KogDAAAAYAAJ&printsec=frontcover

Historical Register of the United States Army: From Its Organization...1789-1889, by Francis Bernard Heitman
http://books.google.com/books?id=XIcFAAAAMAAJ&printsec=titlepage

Starting with the 1808-1809 Regiment Of Riflemen officers as a baseline; secondly,  the key officers from the expansion of the Rifles to four regiments in 1814; and then the final Postwar 1815-1821 contingent of officers (many of whom came from the expanded Rifles); I have attempted to compile mini-bios of each officer.  I attempt to find, fix, copy and paste vignettes and  references of interest consisting of links to the website from whence the passage(s) came.  If I get carried away, or off topic..finding unusual characters and connections, genealogical and historical...the so be it. Apologies, up-front - for missing officers and the seemingly haphazard approach taken - no omission is deliberate.  As I scour the web, in an often serendipitous fashion, and new/old information is brought to my attention, I add to or edit entries as deemed necessary.
Again - this is an unfinished work in progress - a hobby only - and one I treat as a sort of enjoyable puzzle - finding and discovering lost or overlooked "pieces" - persons, places, and events - and putting them together.

TIP:
Use your browser 'find" feature and copy, type the name of the officer from the list(s) provided in order to facilitate quickest access....

----------------------------------1808-1809 -------------------------------------------------


1809 Regimental Listing - first published in the Army Register for 1809

Regiment Of Riflemen.
Colonel.
Alexander Smyth. 8 July, 1808.
Lieut. Colonel.
William Duane, 8 July, 1808.
Major.
John Fuller, 12 Dec, 1808.
Captains. Thomas A. Smith, 8 May. 1808. George W. Sevier. 3 May, 1808. James McDonald. 3 May. 1808. John Ragan, 3 May. 1808. Moses Whitney, 18 June. 1808. David Findley. 18 June, 1808. Alexander S. Walker, 1 July. 1808. Benjamin Forsythe, 1 July, 1808.
1st Lieutenants. Abraham A. Massias. 3 May, 1808. Thomas Spencer. 3 May, 1808. Fielder Ridgeway. 3 May, 1808. Charles Porterfield. 3 May, 1808. Michael C. Hays. 3 May, 1808. Dill Armor, 18 June, 1808. Benjamin Champney. 27 Oct, 1808. George Morrison. 12 Dec, 1808. David Moss. [no date]
2nd Lieutenants. Elzey L. James, 3 May, 1808. Lodowick Morgan. 3 May, 1808. Matthew Cannon. 3 May, 1808. Daniel Appling. 3 May, 1808. Joshua Hamilton. 18 May, 1808. Horace S. White. 12 Dec, 1808. Lewis Weir. 12 Dec, 1808. Thomas A. Patterson, 12 Dec, 1808. Thomas Ramsey. 27 Jan, 1809. William Smith.[no date]
Ensigns. Joseph S. Pepper, 3 May, 1808. Elias Stallings, 3 May, 1808. Arthur W. Thornton, 3 May. 1808. Francis Stribling. 3 May, 1808. Augustus L. Langham. 3 May, 1808 . John Logan. 1 July, 1808. William D. Jones. 12 Dec, 1808. Edmund Foster, 12 Dec, 1808. James Johnson, 12 Dec. 1808.
Surgeon. Smith Cutler, 12 Dec, 1808.
Surgeon's Mate. Enos Lewis, 12 Dec, 1808.

from List of officers of the army of the United States from 1779 to 1900, by William Henry Powell, 1900, p. 49
http://books.google.com/books?id=KogDAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA49#v=onepage&q&f=false%20

some additions from  Senate Journal of the executive proceedings of the Senate of the United States of America, 1805-1815 TUESDAY, June 20, 1809. 
Henry R. Graham, appointed a Captain in the regiment of Riflemen, March 8th, 1809.Nanning J. Vischer, of New York, appointed a Captain in the regiment of Riflemen, April 26th, 1809.

Journal of the executive proceedings of the Senate of the United States of America, 1805-1815
WEDNESDAY, February 27, 1811.p. 172
Regiment of Riflemen.
Captain Thomas A. Smith, to be promoted to Lieutenant Colonel, vice William Duane, resigned 31st July, 1810.
First Lieutenant Fielder Ridgeway, to be promoted to Captain, vice Thomas A. Smith, promoted.
Second Lieutenant Thomas Ramsay, to be promoted to First Lieutenant, vice Fielder Ridgeway, promoted.
Second Lieutenant William Smith, to be promoted to First Lieutenant, vice Benjamin Champney promoted.



-----------------------------------------------1812-1814---------------------------------------------------------------

Dennis Segelquist's The United States Rifle Regiment Of The War Of 1812 - Tuesday, January 06, 2009
provides a textural listing of appointments and listings of the Rifle Regiment(s) during the war years as published at the Library of Congress. Rifle Regiment appointments in 1812, the United States Rifle Regiment, Register of 1813. appointments in  1813, 1814, the Rifle Regiments of 1814 - First, Second, Third and Fourth - and the First Rifle Regiment as of 1815 are detailed.

1814 - List of Officers - for 1st, 2nd, 3rd and 4th Rifle Regiments derived from:
List of officers of the army of the United States from 1779 to 1900, by William Henry Powell, 1900, ppn137-139 



-------------------------------------------1815 & 1820 ----------------------------------------------------


Postwar Rifle regiment - first officer listing as of 1815
RIFLE REGIMENT
Colonel Th. A. Smith 6 July, 12 - B.g. brevet 24 Jan 14
Lieutenant Colonel
W. S. Hamilton 21 Feb 1814
Major
Talbot Chambers 21 Feb 1814 - Lt col brvt 17 Sep 14
Captains
Willoughby Morgan 6 July 1812 - Maj. brvt 26 June 13 , Joseph Selden 6 do[ditto above] - Maj. brvt 21 Feb 14, lt col. bvt 1 may 15, Wm Bradford 6 do - Maj. brvt 20 Aug. 14, Jos Kean 17 Mar 1814,
Benj Birdsall 17 do, Jno O'Fallan 17 do - Maj. brvt 15 Aug. 14, Henry V. Swearengen 11 May 1814, Edmund Shipp 26 do, W.L. Dufphey 12 Aug 1814, C.A. Trimble 20 Aug 1814
First Lieutenants
Louis Laval 28 July 1813, J. Calhoun, jr 24 Jan 1814, J.H. Ballard 17 Mar 1814,
E.I. Langham 17 Mar 1814, Lewellan Hickman 17 Mar 1814, Stoughton Gantt 17 do, J. M'Gunnegle 28 Apr 1814, David B Stith 1 Sep 1814, Saml V. Hamilton 17 Sep 1814, Jn Heddleston 30 do
Second Lieutenants
W Armstrong 24 Jan 14, WJ Gordon 17 Mar 14, Th Griffith 17 do, John Hoilingsworth 26 Mar 14,
Bennet Riley 15 Apr 14, W.N. Bryan 25 do, W. Markle jr 29 do, James S Gray 11 May 14, Chs. L. Harrison 26 do, Overton W Crockett 30 Sep 14
Surgeon Lewis L Near 17 Mar 14
Surgeon's Mates Saml. P. Hugo 12 Mar 12
Wm H. Henning 20 Apr 14
A Compilation of Registers of the Army of the United States, from 1815 to 1837...by William A. Gordon, 1837
http://books.google.com/books?id=XIcFAAAAMAAJ&printsec=frontcover


Officers retained in the Army on the Peace Establishment, with reduced rank
Rifle Regiment
Thomas A. Smith, Brigadier General, 24th January, 1814, to be Colonel, 6th July, 1812.
Willoughby Morgan, Major, 12th Infantry, 26th June, 1813, to be Captain, 6th July, 1812.
Joseph Selden, Major, 3d Rifle, 21st February, 1814, to be Captain, 6th July, 1812.
William Bradford, Major, 21st Infantry, 20th August, 1814, to be Captain, 6th July, 1812.
p. 17

-----------------------------------
Promotions and Appointments
William S. Blair, late 2d Lieut. 2d Rifle, to be 3d Lieut. Rifle regiment.
Edwin Wyatt, of Tennessee, to be Surgeon, Rifle regiment. February 7th, 1817
William S Blair lale 2d Lieut 2d Rifle to be 3d Lieut Rifle regiment Edwin Wyatt of Tennessee to be Surgeon Rifle regiment
---------------
Brevet Lieutenant Colonel Talbot Chambers, Major, to be Lieutenant Colonel, 8th March, 1817, vice Hamilton, resigned.
Brevet Major Willoughby Morgan, Captain, to be Major, 8th March, 1817, vice Chambers, promoted.
1st Lieutenant James S. Mclntosh, to be Captain, 8th March, 1817, vice Morgan, promoted.
1st Lieutenant Joseph Calhoun, to be Captain, 31st March, 1817, vice Kean, resigned.
1st Lieutenant James H. Ballard, to be Captain, 22d April, 1817, vice Shipp, deceased.
2d Lieutenant Bennet Riley, to be 1st Lieutenant, 31st March, 1817, vice Heddleston, resigned
2d Lieutenant James S. Gray, to be 1st Lieutenant, 31st March, 1817, vice Calhoun, promoted.
2d Lieutenant Thomas F. Smith, to be 1st Lieutenant, 22d April, 1817, vice Ballard,promoted.
2d Lieutenant Thomas F. Hunt, to be 1st Lieutenant, 1st July, 1817, vice Hamilton, resigned.
2d Lieutenant William S. Blair, to be 1st Lieutenant, 15th July, 1817, vice Harrison, dropped.
2d Lieutenant Horace Broughtou, to be 1st Lieutenant, 31st July, 1817, vice Hollingsworth, resigned. .'
---------------
William G. Shade, late 2d Lieutenant, 14th Infantry, to be 2d Lieutenant, Rifle regiment, 22d May, 1817.
John Gantt, Kentucky, to be 2d Lieutenant, Rifle regiment, 24th May, 1817.
Gabriel Field, Missouri, to be 2d Lieutenant, Rifle regiment, 24th May, 1817.
John Clark, late 2d Lieutenant, 36th Infantry, to be 2d Lieutenant, Rifle regiment, 20th June, 1817.
Charles Pentland, late 3d Lieutenant, 4th Rifle, to be 2d Lieutenant, Rifle regiment, 9th October, 1817.
Edward S. Gantt, late Brevet 2d Lieutenant, Light Artillery, to be 3d Lieutenant, Rifle regiment, 2d November, 1817.
---------------
November, 1817 appointments
Francis Smith, Kentucky, to be 2d Lieutenant, Rifle regiment
Thomas W. Kavenaugh, Kentucky, to be 2d Lieutenant, Rifle regiment.
--------------
February 1818 Promotions
First Lieutenant Lewn Hichman to be Captain 15th February, 181[8] vice Dufphey resigned 
Second Lieutenant William G Shade to be First Lieutenant 15th February, 1818 vice Hichman promoted

---------------
1st Lieutenant Stoughton Gantt, to be Captain, 15th April, 1818 vice Calhoun, resigned.
2d Lieutenant John Gantt, to be 1st Lieutenant, 5th April, 1818 vice Broughton, resigned. '
2d Lieut Gabriel Field, to be 1st Lieut., 15th April, 1818, vice Gantt promoted.
--------------
15th April, 1818 appointments
Daniel H. Campbell, Kentucky, to be 2d Lieutenant, Rifle regiment.
Martin Scott, Vermont, to be 2d Lieutenant, Rifle regiment.
Thomas Martin, Virginia, 2d Lieutenant, Rifle regiment.
George C. Catlet, Kentucky, to be 2d Lieutenant, Rifle regiment.
David A. Hall, Vermont, to be 2d Lieutenant, Rifle regiment
John Hall, late Major in the Marine Corps, to be Paymaster, Rifle regiment.
John Gale, Surgeon's Mate of the 3d Infantry, to be Surgeon, Rifle regiment.


---------------
Lieut. Col. T. Chambers, to be Colonel, 10th Nov., 1818, vice Smith, resigned.
Major Willoughby Morgan, to be Lieut. Col., 10th Nov., 1818, vice Chambers, promoted.
Brevet Major W. Bradford, Captain, to be Major, 10th Nov., 1818, vice Morgan, promoted.
1st Lieut James McGunnegle, to be Captain, 12th July, 1818, vice Birdsall, deceased.
1st Lieut Wm. Armstrong, to be Captain, 31st July, 1818, vice O'Fallon, resigned.
1st Lieut Bennet Riley, to be Captain, 6th August, 1818, vice Ramsey, deceased.
1st Lieut James S. Gray, to be Captain, 10th Nov., 1818, Bradford, promoted.
2d Lieut. John Clark, to be 1st Lieut., 12th July, 1818, vice McGunnegle, promoted.
2d Lieut Charles Pentland, to be 1st Lieut, 31st July, 1818, vice Armstrong, promoted.
2d Lieut. Francis Smith, to be 1st Lieut, 6th August, 1818, vice Riley, promoted.
2d Lieut. Thos. Kavenaugh, to be 1st Lieut. 10th Nov., 1818, vice Gray, promoted.
2d Lieut Loring Palmer, to be 1st Lieut, 10th Nov., 1818, vice Shade, resigned.
----------

Thomas Mahon, late Lieut, 16th Infantry, to be 2d Lieut, Rifle, 22d July, 1818.
Ignatius P. McCandless, Va., to be 2d Lieut, Rifle, 31st July, 1811.
Samuel Shannon, Md., to be 2d Lieut, Rifle, 10th September, 1818.
Nathan L. Reeves, late Lieut., 19th Infantry, to be 2d Lieut, Rifle, 10th September, 1818. ' John L. H. Lewis, Va., to be 2d Lieut, Rifle, 12th November, 1818.
Perry D. Melon, Ky., to be S. Mate, Rifle, 10th August, 1818.
---------
1st Lieut. Thomas F. Smith, to be Captain, 2.5th April, 1819, vice Gantt, deceased.
2d Lieut. Martin Scott, to be 1st Lieut.., 2d November, 1819, vice Campbell, resigned.

----------
J. Edmondson, to be 2d Lieut. Rifle, 22d March, 1819.
Roswell Conant, Cadet, to be 2d Lieut. Rifle, 1st July, 1819.
John Duncan, Pennsylvania, to be 2d Lieut. Rifle, 4th December, 1819.
John Clark, Pennsylvania, to be 2d Lieut Rifle.
Stephen Shea, late Lieutenant, to be 2d Lieut. Rifle.
---------
RV McGuire Md to be Surgeon's Mate Rifle regiment, [Mar 1820]
---------
2d Lieutenant Samuel Shannon, to be 1st Lieutenant, 23d February, 1820, vice Martin, dropped.
---------
"The regiments of Infantry were to be reduced from nine to seven the Rifle regiment being broken"
p. 288
http://books.google.com/books?id=rl8UAAAAYAAJ&printsec=frontcover&source=gbs_ge_summary_r&cad=0


The following article, viewable at google books including text and pdf format, offers a rare glimpse of the postwar Rifle Regiment officer corps in 1819:
Report Of Inspection Of The Ninth Military Department, 1819 pp. 261-274 - Mississippi Valley Historical Association, 1921

Postwar Rifle Regiment - "last roll call" (officer) as of Army Register 1820
Rifle Regiment
Colonel Talb't Chambers 10 Nov 18
Lieutenant Colonel Will by Morgan 10 Nov 18
Major Wm. Bradford 10 Nov 18 - Brvt. 20 Aug. 14.
Captains Thos Biddle 6 July 12 - Maj. brvt. 15, W. Martin 17 Mar. 14 - Aug.14., Mat J. Magee 10 Feb. 15, J.H. Ballard 22 Apr 17, J. M'Gunnegle 12 July 18 - ADQMG, Wm Armstrong 31 do, Bennet Riley 6 Aug., James S Gray 10 Nov., T.F. Smith 25 Apr. 19, T.F. Hunt 20 May 20 - ADQMG,
First Lieutenants W.S. Blair 15 July 17, John Gantt 5 Apr. 18, Gab. Field 15 do,
C. Pentland 31 July - Adjutant, Thos. W. Kavanaugh 10 Nov, L. Palmer 10 do, Martin Scott 2 Nov. 19 - Qr master, Sam. Shannon 23 Feb. 20, Gideon Lowe 15 Mar. - ACS, Daniel Keith 20 May,
Second Lieutenants W.D. M'Cray 3 Feb 19., J Edmondson 22 Mar., John Duncan 4 Dec. 19, John Clark 28 Jan. 20, Stephen Shea 28 do, Jno. H. Winder 1 July, Wharton Rector 12 do, G.D. Snyder 13 Oct., W. Thompson 27 do, Rd Wells 27 Oct. 20, Paymaster
T Biddle 7 Aug. 20
Surgeon John Gale 18 Apr. 18
Surgeon's Mates.
[None listed]
A Compilation of Registers of the Army of the United States, from 1815 to 1837...by William A. Gordon, 1837
http://books.google.com/books?id=XIcFAAAAMAAJ&printsec=frontcover
 


---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
-------------------------------------------COLONELS----------------------------------------------------------

Colonel Alexander Smyth (VA) - first Colonel US Regiment of Riflemen
Alexander Smyth (1765 – April 17, 1830) was an American lawyer, soldier, and politician from Virginia, who served in the United States House of Representatives and as a general during the War of 1812. Smyth was born on the Island of Rathlin, Ireland. He immigrated to the United States and settled in Botetourt County, Virginia in 1775 where he completed preparatory studies. He studied law, and was admitted to the bar and commenced practice in Abingdon, Virginia. Smyth moved to Wythe County, Virginia, and was a member of the Virginia House of Delegates in 1792, 1796, 1801, 1802, and from 1804 to 1808. He served in the Virginia Senate in 1808 and 1809. Smyth served in the United States Army from 1808 to 1813. Commissioned as a colonel in 1808 [Jefferson Democratic-Republican ties], he served as Inspector General to William Eustis, the acting War Secretary. During the Battle of Queenston Heights he refused to support his commander, General Stephen Van Rensselaer, a militia commander with no experience. After Van Rensselaer's disgrace, Smyth was given command and proved himself equally inept. After the war, Smyth resumed the practice of law, and again became a member of the Virginia House of Delegates in 1816, 1817, 1826, and 1827. He was elected as a Republican to the Fifteenth United States Congress and reelected to the Sixteenth, Seventeenth, and Eighteenth Congresses, serving from March 4, 1817 to March 3, 1825. He was elected again to the Twentieth and Twenty-first Congresses, serving again from March 4, 1827 until his death. Smyth died in Washington, D.C., and was interred in the United States Congressional Cemetery. Smyth County, Virginia is named after him. (wikipedia)
-After receiving a colonelcy in the American army in 1808, he was appointed as inspector general for the army by William Eustis, the acting war secretary. It was surprising appointment since Smyth's experience overseeing a large army was limited to the translation he made of French military guidelines. Predictably, Smyth spent little time organizing or disciplining the army. He hoped instead to distinguish himself as a field command, and he eventually convinced Eustis to send him to the Niagara frontier. Smyth was stationed at Buffalo in September of 1812, only to find he was outranked by a militia commander, Stephen Van Rensellaer. General Smyth was contemptuous of Van Rensellaer's command and gave him no support during the attack on Queenston Heights. Surprisingly, it was Smyth who took over from the disgraced General Van Rensellaer as commander of the Niagara campaign. Smyth was probably a worse commander than Van Rensellaer. His men had virtually no respect for him. Smyth boasted constantly about crossing the Niagara River taking Fort Erie, thereby redeeming America's reputation after the debacle in Queenston. But with 4500 at his disposal in November, his vague planning and lack of military skill botched the invasion. His men were on the verge of rebellion and even made attempts on his life. Peter B. Porter publicly denounced Smyth after this disgrace and even challenged him to a duel. Madison later remarked that Smyth's "talent for military command was... equally mistaken by himself and by his friends." Perhaps the most cutting insult came when Congress actually abolished Smyth's position in March of 1813. Smyth returned to Virginia and was eventually dropped from the army rolls. He continued to practice law and went on to serve six terms in the U.S. House of Representatives.(Gala films) - see google book "The Case of Brigadier General Alexander Smyth." Buffalo Historical Society, 1902
 - The pictorial field-book of the war of 1812 by Benson John Lossing, 1868
A harmless Duel between Porter and Smyth  A solemn Farce  Smyth disbanded  His Petition to Congress 
Memoirs of my own times,Vol II, by James Wilkinson,printed by Abraham Small., 1816
http://books.google.com/books?id=_U4FAAAAYAAJ&printsec=frontcover&source=gbs_ge_summary_r&cad=0

"The early effects, of the movement of the troops to Terre aux Boeufs, as I have before observed, were highly flattering, from the 13th of June, to the 30th of that month; the strength of the corps was increased sixty-nine ; the sick reports decreased, from five hundred and sixty-two, to four hundred and forty-two; and I exulted in the pleasing prospect of a happy issue to the season. To shew what were my feelings, at that period, I must beg leave to refer to my letter, of the 11th of June, transmitted the secretary of war, by Colonel Alexander Smyth, of the rifle corps, of whom I had formed a most favourable opinion, founded on my observation of his conduct, while under my orders in New Orleans; but by the arrival of Colonel Russell[7th Inf], Colonel Smyth's command was reduced to a narrow compass; which circumstance, added to his solicitations, and the exposition of his domestic cares, induced me to give him a furlough.
Colonel Smyth, on his voyage down the Mississippi, at my request, called at the camp; and I then wrote the ietter of the 11th of June, under such a pressure of engagements, that he obligingly copied it.
It will be seen, that, in this letter, I recommended to the secretary of war, in such terms, as I then believed he merited; and I hold the copy in his own manuscript, from which I extract the following paragraph.
"I reached this position, with the rear of the levies, on the 9th inst., and have flattering prospects of a healthy camp. Colonel Smyth has examined the ground, and can describe it to you.
"Since leaving the city, the health of the detachment is sensibly improved."

I know not what report, Colonel Smyth presented to the secretary of war, but I certainly should not have made reference to him, if I had not been assured it would be favourable; and as he voluntarily copied the letter of which he was the bearer, if I had formed an erroneous conclusion, an honourable man would have apprised me of it, at the time, or declined my recommendation; but Colonel Smyth did neither, and yet he has expressed himself, on that and other professional subjects, in a manner which may render an enquiry necessary.
While our prospects continued thus flattering, between Secretary the 14th and 20th of June, I received the secretary's letter, of the 30th of April, on which the charge of disobedience of orders has been grounded." pp. 374-375
Memoirs of my own times,Vol II, by James Wilkinson,printed by Abraham Small., 1816
http://books.google.com/books?id=_U4FAAAAYAAJ&printsec=frontcover 

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Colonel Thomas Adams Smith (GA) - second Colonel US Regiment of Riflemen - Colonel postwar Rifle Regiment - brevet BRIGADIER GENERAL
Second Lt Arty 15 Dec 1803 : First Lt Dec. 1805: Capt Rifle 3 May 1808 : Lt colonel Rifle. 81 July 1810 : Colonel 6 July '12 : Brig, (centrai 24 Jan. 1814: retained, May 1815, Colonel Rifle, with bvt of Brig. General: resigned 10 Nov. 1818. [Receiver of pub. mon. Land Off Missouri Apr 1818]

MANUSCRIPT COLLECTION OF GEN THOS A SMITH, State Historical Society of Missouri, page 209 
Missouri historical review, Volume 6,by State Historical Society of Missouri, Floyd Calvin Shoemaker, 1912
http://books.google.com/books?id=FmsUAAAAYAAJ&printsec=frontcover
Letter Books.
Vol 1 Covers dates from March, 1812, to September 7 of the same year, there being 156 letters written from Point Petre, St. Fernandina, Moosa Old Fort, and Camp before St. Augustine.
Vol 2 has from September 9, 1812, to March 28, 1813, 123 letters from Camp before St. Augustine, Point Petre, Camp New Hope and other camps.
Vol. 3 from November 27,1813, to Oct. 27, 1814, 181 letters from Sackett's Harbor, Plattsburg, Camp Champlain, Camp Chester and Camp near Buffalo.
Vol. 4 from September 7, 1815, to May 27, 1817, 271 letters from Headquarters St. Louis and Cantonment Belle Fontaine .
Vol. 5 from May 28, 1817, to May 9, 1818, 216 letters from Belle Fontaine.
Vol. 6 from May 10,1818, to Aug. 23, 1818, 89 letters from Belle Fontaine and Franklin.
Book 7 from July 30, 1818, to Aug. 27, 1831, 381 letters from Franklin.
The letters after June 11, 1820, relate to the land office business at Franklin. In the seven books there are copies of 1417 letters. The first three books relate to the War of 1812, the next three cover the time when Gen. Smith was in command of the Western military district, having under him the forts at Prairie du Chin, Rock Island, Des Moines, Fort Osage, Fort Smith in Arkansas, etc.
Of letters and reports received by him them are 62 from 0'Fallon, many from Wilkerson, and other military commanders, in all 400 letters written to him and 1417 from him.

"Thomas Adams Smith entered the U.S. Army as an ensign and was commissioned second lieutenant of artillery on 15 December 1803, and captain of rifles on 8 May 1808. Smith was promoted to colonel while serving in the U.S. Army in East Florida in 1812. With the opening of hostilities in the War of 1812, Smith's regiment was ordered to the North, and took part in the engagements at Plattsburg, Sackett's Harbor and Burlington. By November 1813 he had been transferred to Sacketts Harbor, New York, and promoted to brigadier general. He was sent to Camp Champlain in 1814 where he and a group of riflemen protected the area from the Fox, Sac, and Potawatomi Indians. [ In the spring of 1814 the Americans attempted to force their way past but ended up having to turn back and build Fort Edwards opposite the mouth of the Des Moines (Warsaw, Illinois). Fort Edwards lasted less than a year and was abandoned by the spring of 1815-www.tolatsga.org/sf.html] From 1815 to 1817 General Smith was stationed in St. Louis, the district headquarters for the Ninth Military Department. His jurisdiction included Forts Armstrong, Clark, Crawford, Edwards, Osage, and later Bellefontaine. He resigned as commander-in-chief of the territories of Missouri and Illinois from Fort Bellefontaine in September 1818 to assume the position of receiver of public monies at the land office at Franklin, Missouri. He was considered by William Henry Harrison as the most accomplished officer in the service and Fort Smith, Arkansas, is named in his honor. General Smith and his family lived in Franklin until he purchased land in Saline County in 1829. Thomas Adams Smith died at "Experiment," his estate in Saline County, Missouri, on 25 June 1844. -
"The Military Correspondence dates from 1798 to 1815 and contains correspondence written by army officers to Smith and primarily pertains to military appointments, orders, troop movements, courts martial, negotiations with Native Americans, and the defense and protection of the inhabitants of East Florida. The series includes letters to Smith from army personnel during his service as commander-in-chief of the Illinois and Missouri territories.
Seven letterbooks dating from 1812 to 1831 comprise the Letterbooks series. Volumes I and II contain correspondence from Smith to officers occupying the east coast of Florida which speak of inadequate clothing and provisions for his troops, Indian depredations, disciplinary problems, illnesses suffered by his troops, attacks by British battleships on the southeastern seaboard of Florida.
In a letterbook written from New York [Volume III], Smith writes of activities during the War of 1812. Indian attacks and troop morale were of prime importance. In Volume IV, composed while the general was stationed in St. Louis, Smith discusses the possibility of obtaining Indian allies to fight against other hostile forces, and writes about military supplies, clothing, and provisions. Written from Bellefontaine, Volume V mentions the appointment of John C. Calhoun as secretary of war and other letters refer to the ever-present Indian attacks and the construction of a new fort at the mouth of the Yellowstone River.
In Volume VI Smith also writes of his intention to retire from the army and assume the duties of receiver of public monies at Franklin, Missouri."
Western Historical Manuscript Collection-Columbia, 23 Ellis Library University of Missouri
http://whmc.umsystem.edu/invent/1029.html

Secret Acts, Resolutions, and Instructions, Under Which East Florida Was Invaded by the United States Troops, Naval Forces, and Volunteers, in 1812 and 1813, together with the Official Correspondence of the Agents and Officers of the
Government, etc. Cooper, James, Sherman, Charles E., G.S. Gideon, printer Washington D.C
http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00000608/00001

The Patriot War and Fort Mose: contains the five part series U.S. Troops in Spanish East Florida, 1812-1813, by T. FREDERICK DAVIS, Florida Historical Quarterly, Part I. July, 1930; Part II. October, 1930; Part III. January, 1931; Part IV. April, 1931; Part V. July, 1931
http://fortmose.com/patriot_war.html

Patrick, Rembert W. "Letters of the Invaders of East Florida, 1812." Florida Historical Quarterly 28 (July 1949) pp. 53-65
The Florida Historical Quarterly Volume 28 Issue 1
http://palmm.fcla.edu/
http://fulltext10.fcla.edu/cgi/t/text/text-idx?page=browsecolls

Florida Fiasco: Rampant Rebels on the Georgia-Florida Border, 1810-1815, by Rembert W. Patrick, 1954, University of Georgia Press, 2010
http://dlg.galileo.usg.edu/ugapressbks/pdfs/ugp9780820335490.pdf
http://books.google.com/books?id=JWc3cvE0Kk0C&printsec=frontcover

Smith, Thomas Adam, delayed in reaching Point Petre, 24; life and character, 71-72, 99-100,
"In the 1780's his family migrated from Virginia to Wilkes County, Georgia, where his father, Francis, became the owner of extensive properties.
Thomas Adam was brought up in Georgia, understood the Georgians' point of view and, as they, hated the Spaniard and the Indian. Smith found his career in the Army. Entering it as an ensign he became a second lieutenant in 1803 at the age of twenty-two, and then in succession a first lieutenant, captain, major, and lieutenant colonel. From the first his men almost worshipped him; his superiors found him an obedient, respectful, courageous officer. He learned the army way: for him an order was to be obeyed, not questioned. He rose rapidly in the service.
Mathews knew Lieutenant Colonel Smith. In fact most prominent Georgians knew the thirty-year-old colonel. Crawford and Troup were his intimate friends and Smith gave their names, William and George, to his sons. His brother-in-law was Peter Early, representative in Congress and later governor of Georgia. James White, founder of Knoxville, Tennessee, was his father-in-law and Hugh Lawson
White, the brother of his wife Cynthia, was already prominent in the Volunteer state. On his paternal side Meriwether Smith, a famous Virginian, was his uncle; he could call George William Smith, who followed Monroe as governor of Virginia, cousin. Thomas A. Smith had the lineage and attributes of an American. Furthermore, his striking appearance, his erect military figure, his handsome face, with heavy brows over dark piercing eyes, his strong chin and high  orehead, and dark hair distinguished him. He could fly into a good Southern rage, "cuss" the army, and his superiors; but he knew when to cuss and when to be respectful. 1"
208-209; "Colonel Smith was a soldier - severe, impatient, quick to take offense, and also quick to forget it.";
assumes command at Point Petre, 80, 315; instructions to Laval, 81; agrees with and aids Mathews, 100, 107; opinion of Patriots, 103, 164; praised by Mathews, 108; position of, 113, 143, 169; forces of, 111, 233, 234, 254, 260; criticizes Madison, 122; orders to, 122, 128-129; reaction to repudiation of Mathews, 123;
Spanish attack, 136-137; ordered to hold ground, 137, 212, 223; camp of, 138; answers Kindelan, 139; need for troops, 154, 222; supply line of, 159, 161; supports Massias, 163; dislikes Florida, 170, 171, 172; punishes deserters,
172-173; plans of, 186-187, 195, 211; difficulties of, 189; opinion of militia, 190, 191; retreat of, 193-194; opinion of Newnan, 197-198, 199, 208, 209; sends aid to Newnan, 203, 204; mentioned, 219, 239, 246, 267; expedition against Indians, 231; dissatisfaction of, 234; critical of medical service, 235; replaced,

The Other War of 1812: The Patriot War and the American Invasion of Spanish, by James G. Cusick, 2007
http://books.google.com/books?id=BxHE3OsgU9EC&printsec=frontcover

The Cana Sanctuary:History, Diplomacy, and Black Catholic Marriage in Antebellum St. Augustine, Florida, by Frank Marotti, University of Alabama Press, Apr 5, 2012
http://books.google.com/books?id=aSZZ3LQoO9gC

"A pre-war regular, Smith was commissioned as a second lieutenant in the artillery in 1803. He was promoted first lieutenant in 1805 and, three years later, transferred to the rifle regiment with the rank of captain. Smith was a lieutenant-colonel in 1810 and was promoted colonel and commander of the rifle regiment in 1812. In that year he commanded a force of regulars that, depending on the federal government's whim, either tried to invade Spanish Florid or prevent irregular American forces from doing so. In January 1814, Smith was brevetted a brigadier-general and given a brigade in Izard's Right Division during the following summer. He was retained in the army at the substantive rank of colonel but resigned in 1818. Thomas Smith was a regular soldier who rendered competent, if unexceptional, service." - THE HARD SCHOOL OF WAR A COLLECTIVE BIBLIOGRAPHY OF THE GENERAL OFFICERS OF THE UNITED STATES ARMY IN THE WAR OF 1812 By Donald E. Graves PART III: THE CLASS OF 1814 -
http://www.napoleon-series.org/index.html

"At the middle of June Izard disposed his troops for a movement into Canada He sent Brigadier General Thomas A Smith with a light brigade of about fourteen hundred men to occupy the village of Champlain 2 five miles below the Canada line....fn-2 This brigade was composed of the Fourth and Tenth Regiments consolidated and commanded by Colonel Pnrdy the Twelfth under Major Morgan Lieutenant Colonel Forsyth's riflemen and a company of artillery under Captain Branch."
The pictorial field-book of the war of 1812 by Benson John Lossing, 1868                                  

"STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY OF MISSOURI
Mr. F. A. Sampson, Secretary of the State Historical Society of Missouri, made a report to the State Press Association at its late meeting at St. Joseph, covering the period since January 1, 1905. During that time the Society received 1,072 bound volumes, 8,555 pamphlets, and 578 serial numbers—a total of more than 10,000 publications. In addition to these there were many volumes of newspapers, atlases, maps, broadsides, and articles for the museum.
The most important manuscript contribution was from the grandchildren of Brig. Gen. Thomas Adams Smith. Gen. Smith entered the army in 1803, and after the war of 1812 was in command of the 9th Military Department with headquarters at Fort La Bellefontaine near St. Louis, and having under him the forts at Ft. Smith, Ark.r (which was named for him) and at Prairie du Chien, Des Moines, Rock Island, and other western points. The collection contains seven volumes of letters and orders written by him, and hundreds of letters and reports received by him. The collection is a very valuable one and should be published." 
"State Historical Society of Missouri, Columbia
The manuscript papers of the late Brigadier-General Thomas Adams Smith in possession of the Society consist of seven bound volumes of letters, orders, etc., sent by him during his military services In Florida during the War of 1812-15, from the Canadian border In 1813-14. and after the close of the war from his headquarters of the Western Military Department at La Belle Fontaine, near St. Louis, from 1812-18.
There are also letters and reports from the officers In command of the forts under him, at Fort Crawford, Prairie du Chien; Fort Armstrong. Rock Island; Fort Osage; and Fort Smith, Arkansas. In addition to these there are letters from many of the prominent men of the day, civil and military. The collection Is an exceedingly important one, historically."
Descriptive list of manuscript collections of the State Historical Society, by State Historical Society of Wisconsin
Iowa journal of history, Volume 3, 1905 p. 635
http://books.google.com/books?id=MgtKAAAAYAAJ

"Smith's land an home at Napton, MO called "Experiment Farm" - Thomas A Smith in Along the Old Trail, By Thomas Claiborne Rainey
http://books.google.com/books?id=1mVaWSzHLVMC&printsec=frontcover
" General Thomas A. Smith, a brother of John Smith T., was a native of Essex county, Virginia. He entered the army in 1800 as ensign, in 1803 was appointed Lieutenant, in 1806 Captain. He saw service on the Canadian frontier. Was appointed Colonel and in 1814 Brigadier General. In 1815 he was in command of the western military department with headquarters at Bellefontaine. He resigned in 1818 when he was appointed Receiver of the Franklin land-office. He purchased large tracts of land in Saline county. The first county seat of Boone county, about a mile from Columbia, was called "Smithton" in his honor. He married a daughter of James White of Knoxville, a sister of Hugh L. White, long a distinguished senator of Tennessee. General Smith lived in Saline county for twenty years before his death on his farm " Experiment " where he died in 1844."
A history of Missouri from the earliest explorations and ..., Volume 3, by Louis Houck
http://books.google.com/books?id=nmcOAAAAIAAJ&dq=%22General%20Thomas%20A.%20Smith%22&pg=PA183
"Note 151. — Judge W. B. Napton. of Marshall. Mo., has in his possession a number of old letters written by Captain Martin, Col. John O'Fallon. General Atkinson, and other officers of this expedition, at different points on the river, to Gen. Thomas A. Smith, the general in command of the district, who was then at Franklin, and who, Mr. Napton says, died on his estate, in Saline county, Missouri, in 1844. From this correspondence the following extracts are made: "The Engineer passed St. Charles four days since."— Letter of John O'Fallon to Gen. T. A. Smith, June 28, 1819. " St. Louis, July 7.1819. The residue of troops embarked on board of the steamboats Johnston. Jefferson, and Expedition, and four keel-boats, on the 5th, and short of St. Charles the two first were badly grounded, and tis probable that ere this that the last is in the same predicament; the river is falling. Colonel Atkinson is here and believes that these boats, in the present state of the water, cannot navigate the Missouri."—O'Fallon. " September 3, 1819. The steamboat Expedition arrived a few days ago. ... It seems that the steamboats are not to go further unless perhaps the Johnston, which has not reached this place. The last accounts from her she was below the channel bar."—Willoughby Morgan."
A History of the Missouri River, Collections of the Kansas state historical society, Volume 9. by Kansas State Historical Society, p. 278
http://books.google.com/books?id=2dw7AAAAIAAJ&dq=Napton%2C%20%20Thomas%20A%20Smith&pg=PA278
"I have received the proceedings of the Court Martial in the case of Col. Chambers, which I herewith enclose. He has been found guilty of the charge preferred against him, and has been sentenced to be suspended for one month, which however, the Court recommends to be remitted. The sentence would seem to be very inadequate to the Offence; and altho' there are mitigating circumstances, I doubt not, the punishment will be thought to be very inadequate by the community. I regret, that so correct an Officer, as Genl Smith was thought to be, should have set the example of such illegal and odious punishment; and that a knowledge of it had not then reached the Government, so that our immediate check might have been put to it. The truth appears to be, that the Officers of the Army, at the end of the War, had a very erroneous mode of thinking, as well on this, as many other points,, which took some years to correct. I believe the establishment is now thoroughly reformed of most of the faults, which grew out of the incidents of the. War. I propose however, to order a Summary Statement of all proceedings of Courts Martial and punishments inflicted on the soldiers to be transmitted to the Office of the Adjutant Genl. so that the government may at once check any abuse which may appear. I do not doubt, but that the example of Genl Smith, and the supposed necessity of the case were the real cause of Col Chamber's improper, and illegal conduct......
1 From H1-- Monroe Papers Department of State; text from an official copy
2 Of Florida."
Letter from Sec War Calhoun to President Monroe, Correspondence of John C. Calhoun By John Caldwell Calhoun, John Franklin Jameson, "Account of Calhoun's early life, abridged from the manuscript of Col. W. Pinkney Starke" pp. 188-189
Frontier swashbuckler: the life and legend of John Smith T, by Dick Steward (John Smith T was the brother of General Thomas A Smith)
http://books.google.com/books?id=3Po8m9ARacQC&printsec=frontcover

His daughter Lucy Ann Smith married the noted Virginian Beverly Tucker, Law Professor at W&M,..p. 380 America's political dynasties, Transaction Publishers, 1997
http://books.google.com/books?id=n4HZVCTQvkEC&lpg=PP1&pg=PA380

Fort Smith, Arkansas was named for General Thomas Adams Smith (1781–1844), who commanded the United States Army Rifle Regiment in 1817. Fort Smith has a sister city relationship with Cisterna, Italy, site of the World War II Battle of Cisterna fought by the United States Army Rangers commanded by Fort Smith native William O. Darby - Darby's Rangers.
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Colonel George W. Sevier (TN) original US Regiment of Riflemen - 1st Rifle Regiment
Ens 2 infy 26 Mar'04. Sec Lt Aug 05; First Lt May '07: Capt Rifle 3 May '08: Lieut colonel Rifle 6 July '12: Colonel 1 rifle. 24 Jan '14: disbanded 15 June '15
"George Washington Sevier, first son of Governor John Sevier by his second wife, Catherine Sherrill Sevier, was the thirteenth child of the Governor. He was born about 1783. He was Circuit Court Clerk of Overton County, Tennessee. (His mother had removed to that County with her family after the death of Governor Sevier)....."p. 201
Notable Southern families, Volume 1, by Janie Preston Collup French, 1918
http://books.google.com/books?id=iU4bAAAAYAAJ&printsec=frontcover
George W. Sevier portrait in Andrew Jackson and early Tennessee history, by Samuel Gordon Heiskell, John Sevier, 1921, p.500
http://books.google.com/books?id=wikWAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA500-IA1#v=onepage&q&f=false
"..Smith's closes competitor for laurels was George W. Sevier, another low-ranking officer with pristine political connections...."Fredriksen, p. 23
As discussed by John Fredriksen in Green Coats and Glory (more later), George W Sevier of the Rifle Regiment was a son of the famous John "Nolichucky Jack" Sevier the commander of the Washington County, Tennessee contingent of the Overmountain Men in the Battle of Kings Mountain, governor of the State of Franklin, Governor of Tennessee, and a U.S. Representative from Tennessee.

Interestingly a 2nd Lieutenant in the 1st Rifles of 1814 under GW Sevier, was Jacob Tipton, a grandson of John Tipton. John Tipton who was "perhaps the most famous of the Tiptons..best known, perhaps, for “whupping” Gov. John Sevier in Knoxville with his fists then besting Sevier’s troops with his own at his home in Washington County, Tennessee when Sevier came to arrest him. John Sevier and Col. John Tipton are the two men most closely associated with the formation and dissolution of the State of Franklin. Sevier fought for it and Tipton fought against it." One might conclude that any animosity was forgotten by their offspring? Grandson Jacob Tipton - later a militia General "enlisted in the War of 1812 from Greene Co. 1st Rifle Regt. of U.S. Army 12-31-1812; Promoted to 3rd Lt. 3-12-1813 and to 2nd Lt. 1-1-1814. Made 1st Lt. 11-7-1814 and honorably discharged 6-15-1815. He reinstated 5-17-1816 as 2nd Lt. of 7th U.S. Inf. made 1st Lt. 7-5-1816 promoted to Capt. 6-1-1817 and later Gen. and Brig. Gen. of State Militia." - http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~hvb1/Tipton/index.htm
Sevier-Jackson feud
"The most noteworthy event—or at least the one most talked of then and worst distorted in subsequent campaign writing and oratory—that occurred during his six years on the Supreme Bench was the culmination of the long feud between Governor Sevier and himself. Like most other affairs in Jackson's early career this one has been so much distorted and warped by party zeal in one direction and malignity in the other that the exact truth of it is now well nigh inexhumable from the mass of rubbish which has overwhelmed it in history....in his angry humiliation, he did say many savage things about Jackson. Among them was the sneering inquiry: " What has this red-headed upstart ever done that entitles him to be military commander-in-chief of Tennessee? Other and better men conquered its independence and then defended it from the savages. Has he ever struck a blow in its behalf? His whole warlike experience and service may be summed up in leading fifteen or twenty men on the trail of about a dozen Indians and then letting every red devil of them get away—almost out from under his feet! He has the reputation of a fighting man, his friends say. Fighting whom? A fellow-attorney in a clumsy farce he and his friends call 'a duel'! * I defy anyone to show me another fight except his unprovoked assault on me in Knoxville two years ago, 'egged on' by his lying friends!" With much more of the same sort, all of which was literally true. Jackson became a major-general without a battle or even a military command of any kind previously. We can imagine the chagrin of a man who could boast that he had fought in Pontiac's War, in 1763; had been a member of Colonel Bouquet's expedition against the Ohio Indians in 1764; had followed Andrew Lewis in the campaigns of 1770, 1772 and at Point Pleasant in 1774; who had seen service in Morgan's Riflemen and commanded a battalion at King's Mountain—with other gallant deeds too numerous to recount even by name— we can imagine the chagrin of such a man at being beaten for the major-generalship in a State he had founded and by one who was studying law while he was founding the State!....We have given considerable space to this incident— or to these incidents—because great prominence has been accorded to them, not only in the history of Tennessee, but also in the annals of the country at large. Also because the feud represented not merely a quarrel between the two men, but the factional politics of the State in its early years. Generally speaking, Sevier represented the old men, Jackson the young men, of the new Tennessee. Sevier embodied its past traditions; Jackson incarnated its future aspirations. Naturally, in a State growing so rapidly as Tennessee then grew, the old men would soon lose their power, particularly when the younger generation had a leader so forceful, so intrepid and so magnetic as Andrew Jackson. It also embodied to some extent a sectional issue which long prevailed between East Tennessee and the rest of the State. After 1794-'95 that part of Tennessee west of the mountains grew by leaps and bounds. East Tennessee stood almost still. About all its people saw or felt in the marvellous growth of the State was the long procession of emigrants passing over their mountain roads. For any thousand that passed through hardly ten in those days would stop and settle east of the mountains or among them. In this sectional feeling, Sevier represented the stationary condition of East Tennessee; Jackson the exuberant and exultant progress of the middle and west sections of the State. Naturally his fortunes rose with his surroundings, while Sevier's star stood still or relatively declined with his.*The feud between the two men, therefore, found vastly more historical importance in what it represented than in what it really was of itself. Of such a feud a perfectly colorless account is impossible. We have done our best to sift a few undisputed facts from an infinite mass of partizan rubbish, and we have at least avoided the tone and tenor of a homily on the then prevailing state of civilization in the Southwest. Governor Sevier and Judge Jackson acted according to the lights and the social laws that guided and governed the conduct of brave Americans in the Seventeenth Century. If, according to present standards, they made mistakes, nothing that could be said now would rectify them...."pp. 134-142
fn-p.134 - "Colonel A. Waldo Putnam was a great-grandson of the French War and Revolutionary hero, affectionately known in our annals as "Old Put." He was born at Marietta, Ohio, 1799, and settled at Nashville about 1835. He was a man of exceedingly chivalrous nature, doubtless hereditary, and was one of the most popular men of his time in Tennessee. Though a grandson-in-law of Governor Sevier, he was also an ardent admirer of Jackson, and in the declining years of the latter—1836 till his death—they were warm friends."
fn-p. 141 -"Colonel Putnam says: "There were no explanations and no apologies. But Governor Sevier vehemently declared he had never said a word or harbored a thought derogatory to Mrs. Jackson or in any way reflecting upon family affairs. Judge Jackson accepted this assurance without hesitation and intimated that he preferred so to believe. . . . After this they ceased to talk of the difficulty, and so far as their conduct toward each other might indicate, they ceased to cherish enmity. But in some of Governor Sevier's children a feeling of bitterness toward General Jackson was long perpetuated; and, perhaps in the bosom of no one so intense as in that of my father-in-law, Colonel George W. Sevier. But even he visited the Hermitage and dined there with the General after his retirement from the presidency."
History of Andrew Jackson: pioneer, patriot, soldier, politician ..., Volume 1,by Augustus C. Buell, 1904
http://books.google.com/books?id=IInHcQPS01kC&printsec=frontcover
American historical magazine, Volume 5, by Peabody Normal College, Tennessee Historical Society, 1900 
http://books.google.com/books?id=J2gUAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA115
JOHN SEVIER PAPERS
File Format: PDF/Adobe Acrobat - Quick View
George W. Sevier - RR career starting with 23. Alexander Smythe to Capt. G.W. Sevier
CLAIBORNE (J.F.H.) COLLECTION: BOOK D, SEVIER LETTERS
http://mdah.state.ms.us/manuscripts/clsevier.html
Sevier letters and papers: "Book D p. 219" Publications of the Mississippi Historical Society, Volume 5, by Mississippi Historical Society, 1902
http://books.google.com/books?id=HkgTAAAAYAAJ&printsec=frontcover

A MEMOIR OF JOHN SEVIER Box S 1 No 39 S No 18
American historical magazine, Volume 6, by Peabody Normal College, 1901
http://books.google.com/books?id=cGgUAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA40

"Some Unpublished Letters of John Sevier to His Son, George Washington Sevier," Tennessee Historical Magazine, VI, 1920

The Journal of John Sevier published in Vols. V and VI of the Tennessee Historical Magazine, 1919-1920 The text is in the public domain. 
http://penelope.uchicago.edu/Thayer/E/Gazetteer/People/John_Sevier/Journal/home.html
Appendix 2: Some Letters of John Sevier to his Son, George Washington Sevier VI.62
http://penelope.uchicago.edu/Thayer/E/Gazetteer/Places/America/United_States/Tennessee/_Texts/THM/5/3/Sevier_Journal/Appendices/2*.html
"Washington 13 January 1812. My Dear Son:...I am not by any means willing you should engage in an Indian agency. I have lost one son among the savages, and I am unwilling to trust another whom you know I much regard. — I should be very unwilling to see you and your beautiful young growing family Settled in the midst of a Savage nation — Your prospects in the Army is good, and you are entitled to promotion, and war being almost shure to commence immediately, it would be improper for you to resign — Colonel Alexander Smith has lodged with me since here I have been until a few days past he went to Baltimore. The Colo. will be I have no doubt promoted to a Brigadier in the course of this session, and of course you will be Lieutenant Colo. of the Rifle Regiment. Fuller will not be promoted, he is already a disgraced officer by the appointment of Smith, & he will not be raised — all your friends here, who all spoke with me last evening are opposed to your going among the Indians, but say they will do everything for your promotion in the Army....my greatest and affectionate Respects to your family.John Sevier Address on back. John Sevier — Free
Captain George Washington Sevier
Fort Hampton. "
"Washington 21 March 1812. Dear Sir...I think I wrote you that the Court Martial had acquited General Wilkinson and that the President had confirmed the decision, but at the same time expressed considerable disapprobation of both the conduct of the Court and the officer accused. The General I am told has not yet received any orders, and various conjectures are afloat on the occasion — General Dearborne is the Major General, and will command the army, no more General officers are as yet appointed — Colonel A. Smyth I expect will be appointed the inspector General, I expect the appointment will be made in the course of next week — The Colonel and myself occupy the same room — It appears to be the colonels opinion that General Wilkinson will not again, be directed to Command — he says the General is very considerably in arrearages, and have also taken the benefit of the insolvent act. My own opinion is to the same effect...."
"Washington 26th April 1812. My Dear Son...I have written to you several times, as to my expectations respecting your promotion, and I still think you will be promoted to Lieutenant Colo. Colo. Smyth have been doing the duties of Inspector General under an order for that purpose, for one month past — The secretary of War sined the order, and also told me that the President would nominate him for Brigadier, and the Senate will no doubt confirm the appointment. The Colonel and myself have lived together on the same floor all the winter, good part of the time on the same room, and on very friendly terms and no doubt will be friendly disposed towards you, at least he so professes, and I have no doubt of his sincerity. The War Department are taking measures to get Rid of Fuller, and I have Frequently signified that if they did not, they may expect that the Captains of the Rifle Regiment would all resign — General Wilkinson is siting out in a few days by way of Pitsburgh to take the command of the army at Orleans again....I would advise you to have a watchfull eye, towards the Creeks, & also the other tribes, for they are much attached to the British — North of the Ohio, the Indians are doing mischief daily — a large body of militia is ordered to detroit, Michigan, and other places in that quarter — Governor Hull isº appointed one of the brigadiers which I had like to have forgotten...."  
"Washington 18 June 1812. Dear Sir...No doubt can remain but we shall have War, the Executive are making the utmost exertions and preparations to meet it and I have no doubt the enemy will find a much better defense than they have calculated upon — The Militia are turning out everywhere with great alacrity, and also the recruiting service is going on very briskly — The Indians are doing much damage on the frontiers everywhere — I hope you will prepare for the worst. Your station is much exposed, you cant be too cautious — I p67am sorry Lt. Hays could not come up with those rascally Creeks — I shall endeavor to have some Mountain Rangers stationed on our frontier...."
"Staunton 22 March 1813. Dear Sir...The British are making up the different towns from Norfolk, and it is difficult to say what they intend — Men are p68collecting in every quarter of Virginia, and marching down — The Russian Emperor is offering his Mediation, and the Minister is very desirous about an accommodation between the U. States and the British Nation — I have no news from Harrisons Army, nor from Sackets Harbor. I wish things there may go well ..."
"Washington 1 day January 1815. Dear Sir...Your letter of 12th ult, have just been received and has relieved me from a world of anxiety, I hope all will be well — We have little or nothing hear — there is nothing since the last dispatches, and all seems to be conjecture as to peace & war...." 

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Colonel Anthony Butler (KY) - 2nd Rifle Regiment
Lt colonel 28th infy 11 Mar 1813: Colonel 2nd Rifle, 21 Feb 1814: disbanded June 1816. [Chargé d'affaires to Мех. 12 Oct '29 to 36.]
Lawyer, soldier, and politician; was born in South Carolina, probably in 1787 in Clarendon County, and established a sizable plantation in Russellville, Kentucky. At the outbreak of the War of 1812 he was commissioned a lieutenant colonel of the Twenty-eighth United States Infantry, on March 11, 1813. On February 21, 1814, he was promoted to colonel of the Second Rifle Regiment. After discharge he served as a member of the Kentucky legislature for two terms, 1818-19, but failed in a run for governor of that state in 1820. Butler was a resident of Mississippi in 1829 when his friend President Andrew Jackson, appointed him to succeed Joel Poinsett as United States chargé d'affaires in Mexico City. Historian Justin H. Smith commented that Butler's only qualifications for the post "were an acquaintance with Texas and a strong desire to see the United States obtain it." He had been through bankruptcy more than once, spoke no Spanish, was ignorant of the forms of diplomacy, and "was personally a bully and a swashbuckler." Further, Smith maintained, Butler was "shamefully careless," unprincipled in his methods, and "openly scandalous in his conduct...In brief, he was a national disgrace." Sam Houston wrote of Butler in 1832, "Such men as he is, would destroy a country, but take my word for it, he will never gain one!"Butler was recalled to Washington early in January 1836 but remained in Mexico on his own authority and continued to report to Jackson on the actions and intentions of the Mexican government toward Texas. He at last returned to the United States in May 1836. He then took residence in Washington County, Texas, and in September 1838 was elected to the House of Representatives of the Third Texas Legislature. At the outbreak of the Mexican War he offered his services to Gen. Zachary Taylor, believing that his knowledge of the country would be useful. Butler moved to the North in 1847 or 1848. As a Mason he was grand master of Kentucky in 1812-13 and of Texas in 1840-41. In 1849 or 1850 he died on the Mississippi River attempting to save his fellow passengers from the burning wreck of the steamboat Anthony Wayne.
His papers are preserved at the Barker Texas History Center,qv University of Texas at Austin. BIBLIOGRAPHY: Eugene C. Barker, "The Private Papers of Anthony Butler," Nation 92 (June 15, 1911). Francis B. Heitman, Historical Register and Dictionary of the United States Army (2 vols., Washington: GPO, 1903; rpt., Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1965). John H. Jenkins, ed., The Papers of the Texas Revolution, 1835-1836 (10 vols., Austin: Presidial Press, 1973). Justin H. Smith, The War with Mexico (2 vols., New York: Macmillan, 1919). Texas House of Representatives, Biographical Directory of the Texan Conventions and Congresses, 1832-1845 (Austin: Book Exchange, 1941). Amelia W. Williams and Eugene C. Barker, eds., The Writings of Sam Houston, 1813-1863 (8 vols., Austin: University of Texas Press, 1938-43; rpt., Austin and New York: Pemberton Press, 1970).
Handbook of Texas Online - BUTLER, ANTHONY (1787?–1849?)
 - http://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/BB/fbu63.html

Jackson’s minister, Anthony Butler, tried to bribe the Mexican government. Jackson called Butler a “scamp” but left him there. Mexico was insulted, and the negotiations went nowhere. - http://www.sagehistory.net/antebellum/topics/texas_mexwar.htm U.S. Special Diplomatic Agent to Mexico, 1829; U.S. Charge d'Affaires to Mexico, 1829-35. Burial location unknown. Recall requested by Mexican government, 21-Oct-1835 - wiki
---------
"1815. By the treaty of peace and amity between Great Britain and the United States, concluded at Ghent, Belgium, December 24th, 1S14, and signed by Lord Gambier, Henry Goulbourn and William Adams, on the part of Great Britain, and by John Qnincy Adams, James A. Bayard, Henry Clay, Jonathan Russell and Albert Gallatin, on the part of the United States (ratifications exchanged February 17th, and proclaimed February 18th, 1815), the post of Michilimackinac was again restored to the United States. On March 2Sth, Lieut-General Sir Gordon Drummond sent a despatch from York (now Toronto), Canada, to Lieut Colonel Robert McDouall, of the Glengarry Light Infantry Fencibles, commanding Fort Mackinac and Dependencies, announcing the restoration of peace between Great Britain and the United States. This despatch readied Mackinac May 1st, and of it Col. McDouall in a letter of May 5th, to Colonel Anthony Butler, 2d Rifles, commanding "Michigan Territory and District of Upper Canada," said, "this was the first official communication I had received from my Government, announcing the termination of hostilities and the restoration of the blessings of peace." Upon the receipt of the above despatch, Col. McDouall sent a detachment of troops to Drummond's Island to prepare for the removal thither, of the Mackinac Garrison. The efforts made at all times by Col. McDouall to protect American citizens and their property from the Indians, deserve mention. On the same day and by the same conveyance that brought General Drummond's despatch, Col. McDouall received a letter from Col. Butler, dated Detroit, April 16th, in reference to the reoccupation of Fort Mackinac by U. S. troops. Col. McDouall's reply, dated May 5th, was conveyed to Col. Butler by Lieut. Worley, of the Royal Navy. The details connected with the restoration of Fort Mackinac to the United States, and of Fort Maiden, Amhcrstbnr£ and Isle anx Bois Blanc to Great Britain, were arranged between Col. Anthony Butler, on the part of the United States, and Lient.-Colonel "W. W. James, of the British Infantry, on the part of Great Britain. The United States troops were withdrawn from Fort Maiden, Ainherstburg and Isle aux Bois Blanc, at noon on the first day of July. British troops, Col. McDonall in command, occupied Fort Mackinac until noon July l0th, when they were relieved by United States troops, consisting of two companies of Riflemen (Captains Willoughby Morgan and Joseph Kean), and half a company (Captain Benjamin K. Pierce's), of artillery, under command of Colonel Anthony Butler. These troops with supplies for six months, left Detroit July 3d, in four vessels (commanded by Lieut. Samuel Woodhouse, U. S. N)., viz.: the U. S. sloop of war Niagara, the U. S. schooner Porcupine, and two private vessels chartered for the trip. William Gamble, Collector of Customs for Mackinac, accompanied the troops. The British withdrew to Drummond's Island in the St. Mary's River, where they established a post. Colonel Butler immediately returned to Detroit, leaving Captain Willoughby Morgan in command at Fort Mackinac. Captain Morgan changed the name of Fort George to Fort Holmes, and for a short time garrisoned it with a small detachment, lie also appointed Michael Donsman, a resident citizen, Military Agent for Mackinac. Major Talbot Chambers, of the Riflemen, arrived at Fort Mackinac, August 31st, and took command, relieving Captain Morgan, who was ordered to Detroit. 1816. Two companies of Rifles left Fort Mackinac, under the command of Colonel John Miller, and established Fort Howard, at Green Bay, Wis."- Annals of Fort Mackinac, by Dwight H. Kelton, 1895 
http://books.google.com/books?id=3DtFLp-Yy-0C&printsec=frontcover

Historic Mackinac: the historical, picturesque and legendary ..., Volume 1, by Edwin Orin Wood, 1918, p. 473
http://books.google.com/books?id=I2cOAAAAIAAJ&pg=PA473


Historical Sketches of the Late War, by John Thomson, 1816
http://books.google.com/books?id=SbcTAAAAYAAJ&printsec=frontcover
http://books.google.com/books?id=WcxNJVKFTnUC&printsec=frontcover

"GEN ANTHONY BUTLER TO JACKSON Clarksville Nov 7 1815
Clarksville, Nov. 7, 1815.
"My dear General
"...Yet I am equally certain that the paramount motive in this case is my country's welfare to which all other considerations will be made to yield when an object so important shall engage my attention. Our country for some time past, as you know, has been unfortunately under the dominion of men who altho' extremely well fitted for the calm of peace were illy calculated to guide the affairs of the nation in war. The war we have just concluded, has to be sure, by a fortunate tho' late selection of leaders terminated honorably and gloriously for our arms. Yet the conduct of that war taken as a whole, proves most strikingly the proposition I laid down of the unfitness to rule us in time of war, either by providing means, or an independent selection of instruments best calculated to secure success and cover the nation with glory. The state of affairs in Europe call upon us to be prepared for every emergency, and requires most especially that a man should be placed at the head of our government whose firmness and judgment in deciding on measures, and whose boldness in execution, would unite the nation around him. Every man in the U. S. looks to you as this individual and whatever might be your private wishes on this subject you would owe it to your county as a patriot not to refuse the station if offered to you. .... In fine, should the peace establishment be augmented, and you can have me appointed with my former rank to any of the new regiments under your command, I would immediately accept. Write me the news of the Capitol and believe me respectfully and truly your friend. A. Butler"pp. 141-142
Andrew Jackson and Early Tennessee History, Volume 2, by Samuel Gordon Heiskell, 1921
http://books.google.com/books?id=LPqZ80I8pfgC&printsec=frontcover

"Washington Feb* 26th. 1817
Sir.
The bill pending before Congress for the admission of the western portion of the Mississippi Territory into the Union and for the establishment of a new Territorial Government has reached that stage which renders its result nearly certain."
Permit me therefore to recommend to your consideration Colo. Anthony Butler" as a Gentleman every way qualified to discharge the duties of Governor of the proposed Territory in a manner honourable to himself, and highly satisfactory to the people of the Territory and the Government of the Union. I owe my acquaintance with Col0. Butler to the events of the war in the North west. Twice during the most critical periods of that war he commanded at Detroit, and he commanded in such a manner as to give universal confidence to the people of a defenceless and exposed frontier. In all the essential requisites of an oflicer, I consider him fully equal to any, of the numerous band of able men, who during the recent war supported with such ability the standard of their Country.
As a civil officer, his strength of judgment, splendid acquirements and accomplished manners eminently qualify him for the office, which his friends are so desirous to see him fill. [Indorsement] Peby. 26. 1817
To the Secy of State
"The western portion of Mississippi territory was authorized, to form a constitution, Mar. 1, 1817, and the eastern portion was organized as Alabama territory. Mar. 3, 18817. (J. S. P.)
"A native of Kentucky; entered the service in 1813 as lieutenant colonel of the 28th Regt . He became colonel of the 2nd Rifle Regt . in Feb. 1814, and was honorably discharged June 15, 1815. He did not receive the appointment solicited. (J. S. F.)" p. 393
L CASS TO THE SECRETARY OF STATE , Historical collections, Volume 36, by Michigan Pioneer and Historical Society, 1908
http://books.google.com/books?id=FJoUAAAAYAAJ&printsec=frontcover

"The [Kentucky] election of 1820 provided an opportunity for a referendum on relief. The gubernatorial candidates — Generals John Adair and Joseph Desha, Colonel Anthony Butler, and US senator William Logan....[Butler] a man so unprincipled that he later embarassed President Jackson with his corrupt behavior as minister to Mexico. Butler came in last... pp. 72-73
A Jackson man: Amos Kendall and the rise of American democracy, by Donald B. Cole, 2004

"To James Monroe, War Dept 14th Oct 1821
I must call your attention to the .appointment of an Inspector General and the extra compensation, which has been allowed to the officers detailed to perform duties in the several Depts, at the Seat of Government. An early decision is not of so much consequence in the latter, but it is desirable, that the Inspection should be made at an early period in the Southern Department of the Army. In addition to what, I observed formerly on the selection to be made, it is proper to state that Col Butler and his friends are dissatisfied with the place assigned him in the late arrangement of the Army, tho' I think without just cause and that he has intimated to Col Gadsden his intention to resign. I believe his case is the only cause of discontent remaining in that Dept of the Army, the transfer of Col Linsay to the Artillery, which prevented Taylor and Woolley from being razeed, and Cobb from being discharged has removed all of the others of which Gen1. Jackson complains. Whether the appointment of Col Butler to the place of Inspr. General would satisfy him and his friends, and whether if such would be the effect, it would, under all of the circumstances of the case be advisable to appoint him, may be worthy of some consideration.1
It was impossible to make a reduction without exciting some discontent, at the selections, but I believe, in the main, that no arrangement could have been made, which would have caused less; and of that which has been excited very little has been from just views of the subject." p. 200
 VOLUME II CALHOUN CORRESPONDENCE, Annual Report of the American Historical Association for the year 1899, p. 200
http://books.google.com/books?id=uixDbGUoSWMC&pg=PA200

"Anthony Butler to Andrew Jackson, Monticello, 4. Sept. 1826"pp. 203-204
"Anthony Butler to Andrew Jackson, Fleurissant, 17 May, 1827
...your adversaries have adopted a mode of attack so well calculated to wound the generous sensibilities of your nature by the assault on Mrs. Jackson.."pp. 320-321
The Papers of Andrew Jackson: Volume VI, 1825-1828, edited by Harold D. Moser and J. Clint Clifft, 2002
http://books.google.com/books?id=W1BQxwXAs6AC&printsec=frontcover

"Rip Raps Virginia 27 August 1829
Sir,
Col. Butler an old acquaintance and friend of mine proceeds to the Capital of Mexico..."p. 393
"Andrew Jackson to Anthony Butler, Washington Octbr. 10th 1829
P.S. The general instructions which will be forwarded by the Secretary of State, & handed over to you by Mr. Poinsett, you are at liberty to shew, very confidentially, and as a mere voluntary act of your own, to the President of Mexico, or other high functionaries of that Government.  When you read them you will discover there is nothing said about the purchase of Texas-You are refered to the instruction sent out by you, to Mr. Poinsett, for your Government on that subject, and being left out of your general instructions, nothing but good can grow out of confidentially shewing to the President these general instructions as a mark of your own confidence in him.  It is all important, that these instructions are shewn to them of your own mere will, & begging at the same time that it may not be known to us-but in such a manner as to induce a belief that it must be kept a profund secrete from your own government, as on that event, it would destroy you. When you have read this P.S. and my private letter you will burn them both, first, if you please, taking notes from them - not being accustomed to diplomacy these might be stolen from you & made a handle against this Government. A.J  [Endorsed by Butler:] remarkable communication" pp. 487-488

"Andrew jackson to Vicente Ramon Guerrero
Private & Confidential
Washington City October 18th, 1829
Respected and dear Sir,
...Col Butler who will deliver you this, in the character of charge de affaires, is appointed with full powers to negotiate upon the many points of common interest to the two countries. I take this occasion -lined out in this unofficial form - to recommend him to you as the gallant commander of one of our Regts of infantry in the last war of the United States with great Britain, and as a soldier & citizen of the highest honor and respectability, well entitled to your confidence...."pp. 497-498


"Andrew Jackson to Anthony Butler, Washington Octbr. 18th 1829
....With this introduction, and the hints contained in my letter of the 10th, I confide much in your ability to conduct the negotiation for the purchase of Texas, which is very important to the harmony and peace of the two republics.  Unless we obtain that Territory we shall be in constant danger of the jealousy which the nature of its population is so well calculated to create.  Its inhabitants will make an effort to set up a free Government the moment they have the power, and we shall be charged with aiding this movement altho all our constitutional powers may be employed to prevent it.  Keep these considerations constantly in view, and if Mexico understands well her true interest, they will prevail
you know the confidence I repose in you; & I am sure that you will endeavor to merit a continuation of it. your friend, & obt. sert. Andrew Jackson
...."In AJ's draft this paragraph reads:....and their own safety if it is considered will induce them to yield now in the present reduced state of their finance."pp. 498-499

The Papers of Andrew Jackson, Volume 7; Volume 1829
http://books.google.com/books?id=daEFkrxIKnkC&printsec=frontcover

"...Correspondence in the Butler Papers suggests strongly that Jackson was originally more amenable to bribing Mexican officials than je later indicated..."p.69
The diplomacy of annexation: Texas, Oregon, and the Mexican War, by David M. Pletcher, University of Missouri Press, 1973

"Gomez-Farias, Vice-president, was performing the duties of President, during the absence of Santa Anna from the Capital. He is no doubt one of the most disinterested Liberals in Mexico, but is at the same time as obstinate and stubborn as a mule. Whether influenced by others, or from his native jealousy of the citizens of the United States, I know not, but there is no doubt he believed he was serving his country by detaining Col. Austin in prison.
After his removal to the Diputacion, a general amnesty law for all political offences passed the Mexican Congress, and if I mistake not Colonel Austin's liberty was procured on account of this measure.10
Mr. Wilcocks was the guardian of two Mexican young ladies residing with their mother in the city. I was very intimate with this family, and introduced your uncle to them before he was imprisoned. He was particularly pleased with one of them, and went frequently to the house—he became a favorite not only with the family, but also with their immediate neighbours and friends. Among the latter, was a very sprightly young lady whose familyhad influence with Santa Anna. This young lady contributed both to his being set at liberty by giving bail, and subsequently to his final freedom. Not having it in his power to evince his gratitude by any important acts, your uncle endeavored by many
"He left the City on July 13, 1835, and returned to Texas by way of Vera Cruz and New Orleans, reaching Texas on September 1.
little attentions to make this lady and the family some return to manifest that he was sensible of the interest they had taken for him. Neither of these families were rich, therefore could not afford those extravagances which are so prized by young ladies of all nations. For the first time, an aeronaut was going to make an ascension and nothing else was talked of in Mexico— but the high price of a Ticket (I think $20) put it out of the power of many to witness it. I accompanied Colonel Austin to take a Box for the use of these ladies and their friends—on the way we conversed about different men, among others of Anthony Butler. With much warmth he remarked to me that "Butler had been the principal cause of his detention"—he did not tell me in what way, nor have I ever learned. Whether Butler's motive was private dislike, or whether he considered Col. Austin as an impediment to his schemes, I do not know—most likelyr both. Butler was also a visitor, and on friendly terms with the family to which I have alluded. Mr. Wilcocks at a subsequent period represented to his government that he, Butler, had made proposals of marriage, although at the time he had a wife living in the United States, to the same young lady, for whom Col. Austin shewed some preference, which fact was probably known to Austin, and contributed to his contempt for that base man." pp. 374-375
Recollections of Stephen F Austin, Southwestern Historical Quarterly, Volume 20, by Eugene Campbell Barker, Texas State Historical Association, University of Texas at Austin. Center for Studies in Texas History, 1917
http://books.google.com/books?id=jCAUAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA369

"The potential senator spent the Christmas holidays in the city of Houston. Inured as he [Sam Houston] was to criticism, he may not have felt that the spirit of the season was greatly marred by an especially abusive letter which he received from Anthony Butler. Butler, seeting with accumulated bitterness, threatened to check Houston's career by revealing information, long in his possession, that Jackson was not a Houston supporter and admirer. The timing would indicates that Butler meant to use his information to defeat Houston's ambitions for the senate.  Houston's Christmas Day reply, after a "leisurely perusal" of his "gift of the season," was a classic in sarcasm addresses to one whose name was "synonymous with infamy" but who was "one of the most intelligent, amusing, and agreeable scoundrels" he had ever known."..." p. 165
"Sam Houston, the Great Designer, by Llerena Friend, University of Texas Press, 1954
http://books.google.com/books?id=8eGx_UxZs-QC&printsec=frontcover

"In view of Poinsett's unpopularity, the Mexican government determined to ask for his recall, its wishes being communicated to Van Buren on October 17." The United States government had already determined upon the recall and on the previous day had prepared a note informing Poinsett that his mission was at an end. It was not despatched, however, until after Montoya presented his request.12
The mission was offered to General James Hamilton of South Carolina, but because of domestic engagements, he was unable to accept,13 and Colonel Anthony Butler of Mississippi was selected as Poinsett's successor. He had already been despatched to Mexico for the purpose of assisting in the negotiations for Texas. Van Buren 's letter of introduction read:
Colonel Butler has made himself well acquainted, by actual examination, with the territory in question, its streams and localities. In the belief that he deserves your confidence, and that he may be useful to you in the negotiation by supplying you with facts which might not otherwise be within your reach, he has been instructed to observe your directions in regard to his stay at Mexico, and his agency in the matter whilst there.'*
Butler was appointed charge d'affaires in October; his instructions presented a resume of the diplomatic intercourse with Mexico and warned him against falling into the errors of his predecessor.....
Butler's conduct does not appear to have been such as would raise either him or his government in the opinion of the Mexicans. James S. Wilcocks, the United States Consul in Mexico City, preferred charges against him '' to show that the said Butler is unworthy of and a disgrace to the office he now holds, and ought to be recalled by his Government." He charged him with immorality, seduction, usury, refusal to pay debts, assault, interference with the consular duties, and lastly,
for being a mean and despicable character; inasmuch as he himself has confessed that, before the election of General Andrew Jackson for President of the United States of America, he was in favor of Henry Clay, Ksq., a candidate for that office; and seeing that General Jackson was likely to gain the election, he left Mr. Clay's party and went over to that of the General—a base, sordid and dishonorable act.70
Butler was informed of these charges by the Secretary of State, that he might make such explanations as he could. Without taking the trouble to investigate or waiting for Butler's defense. Jackson decided to dismiss Wilcocks; six days later the charges were sent to Butler and he was asked to find a suitable person to fill the position.71
In October Butler wrote to Jackson advising the military occupation of Texas by United States troops...The same month he again suggested to the President that several hundred thousand dollars be used in bribes. Jackson replied that he had no intention of bribery and advised Butler to be cautious.72
In February, 1834, Butler again expressed his opinion that bribery was the only means of acquiring Texas. A month later he urged that the United States take forcible possession, and suggested that he be placed as chief officer of the territory. On the back of the letter Jackson wrote:
A Butler. What a scamp. Carefully read. The Secretary of State will reiterate his instructions to ask an extension on the treaty for running boundary line, and then recal him, or if he has received his former instructions and the Mexican Government has refused, to recal him at once.73
It would appear from this that Jackson was following a straight course and that his motives were entirely above reproach, but a shadow of doubt is thrown upon the case when the fact is taken into consideration that the "scamp" was not recalled for over a year. Jackson was thoroughly aware of his worthlessness; if the President's motives had been sincerely open, the minister should have been recalled as soon as possible." pp. 104-105
A history of the western boundary of the Louisiana Purchase, 1819-1841, Volume 2, by Thomas Maitland Marshall, 1914
http://books.google.com/books?id=l363ei31ILoC&printsec=frontcover


"Jackson, in July, 1843, long after his presidency, received a letter from Anthony Butler, referring to charges just made against him in a Whig pamphlet, and asking the general to sustain him. Butler had been Jackson's minister to Mexico, where, in 1834, he made special effort to procure a peaceable transfer of Texas to the United States, for $5,000,000, advising that out of this fund a certain part should be devoted to bribing Mexican officials (notably Santa Anna) to sign a treaty of cession. Butler now claimed that President Jackson had sanctioned and then angrily denounced the proposed bribery, and then in an oral conversation had signified his willingness, provided the affair was managed without his own cognizance. Jackson in reply roundly denounced Butler as a scamp, and his statement as a tissue of falsehoods. Jackson's disapproval of bribery by his minister may well be believed; but sure it is that Butler's dispatches from Mexico, proposing in a translated cipher precisely such a course, were duly read by the President and placed among his private papers instead of the public archives, and that Butler continued the negotiation, though in vain. Jackson was always strong and sweeping in his asseverations, but in the concentration of immediate purpose he sometimes forgot past facts..."p. 220
The Jackson and Van Buren Papers, The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 96, by Philip Gengembre Hubert
http://books.google.com/books?id=AlkCAAAAIAAJ&printsec=frontcover


"Butler's negotiations.—In these three ways, therefore, first, by commercial intercourse, then through fear of the Russian advance, and lastly by the opening up of the overland routes of communication, California gradually became more than a passing name to the people of the United States.81 It was not, however, until 1835 that this government, influenced largely by the representations of commercial interests, made its first attempt to secure the harbor of San Francisco.82
This early negotiation for the purchase of California was closely interwoven with the contemporaneous negotiation for the acquisition of Texas, forming indeed, simply a minor part of the larger project. Anthony Butler, a man eminently unqualified for any position of trust, was sent to Mexico in 1829 to carry out a scheme for the purchase of Texas which he himself had probably suggested,88 succeeding Joel R. Poinsett, the American minister who was recalled at the request of the Mexican government. For six years Butler was left free to work his will, so far as he was able, with the Mexican officials, and to discredit both himself and his government.
From the first, Butler's communications to the State Department began to hint at bribery as the best means of accomplishing his purpose, and soon were openly advocating it.84 Early in June,
The statement is not infrequently made that the purchase of California was attempted by Clay when Secretary of State under Adams. See, for example, Xiles' Register, IXVIII, 211; speech of Charles J. Ingersoll, Jan. 19, 1847. Appendix to Congressional Globe, 29 Cong., 2 sess., 128; Bancroft, XIII, 322-323. Whoever may have written this volume of Bancroft could scarcely have known the contents of volume XX, 399-400, of the same series, or of H. Ex. Docs., 25 Cong., 1 sess., No. 42, which he cites as authority. The boundaries for which Poinsett was instructed to negotiate included no territory west of the Colorado south of the 42d parallel. Clay to Poinsett, March 25, 1825. H. Ex. Docs., 25 Cong., 1 sess., No. 42, p. 6; same to same, March 15, 1827, Ibid., 9. See also Memoirs of John Quincy Adams with portions of his diary from 1795 to 1848, edited by C. F. Adams (Philadelphia. Lippincott. 1877), XI, 349.

"The plan, dated August 12, 1829, is in the Van Buren MSS., Library of Congress; see also Jackson to Van Buren, Aug. 12 (Ibid.), and Jackson's draft of Aug. 13. According to Reeves, the official instructions, dated Aug. 25, were carried by Butler to Poinsett. Jesse S. Reeves, American Diplomacy under Tyler ami Polk (Baltimore. The Johns Hopkins Press. 1907). 65-67. For a complete estimate of Butler and his career in Mexico, the reader is referred to George Lockhart Rives, the United States and Mexico, 1821-1848 (New York. Charles Scribner's Sons. 1913), 1, 235-261. It is perhaps well to add that the present article was in manuscript before Rives's exhaustive work was issued from the press. I have not been able, therefore, to avail myself of its contents as freely as I could have wished.
"Butler has suggested to a Mexican official that the United States is capable of "devising ways and means" of relieving the embarrassment of the treasury (Butler to Jackson, Feb. 23, 1832, Jackson MSS., Library of Congress) ; Jackson thinks Butler's suggestion "judicious" and one that may "lead to happy results" (Jackson to Butler, April 19, Ibid.). Butler believes the use of half a million dollars to put certain personages in the "right humor" will bring speedy conclusion of the treaty (Butler to 1834, he asked to return to the United States on the ground that a personal interview with the President was highly important, and that after it he could return to Mexico to be much more useful to his government.85 Having finally secured Jackson's consent to his request, Butler landed in New York in the early part of June, 1835, with a still more extensive scheme of bribery in his head than any he had so far suggested, and in his pocket a note signed by Hernandez, a priest standing close to Santa Anna.
On June 17 the returned Minister addressed a letter to the Secretary of State, John Forsyth, and enclosed the note from the Mexican priest. In this Hernandez had promised to bring about a cession of the desired territory provided $500,000 were placed at his disposal "to be judiciously applied."20 In the accompanying letter Butler assured Forsyth that the plan, if followed, would result not merely in the acquisition of Texas but eventually in the dominion of the United States "over the whole of that tract of territory known as New Mexico, and higher and lower California, an empire in itself, a paradise in climate . . . rich in minerals and affording a water route to the Pacific through the Arkansas and Colorado rivers."87
This matter met with cool response from the President.88  Nevertheless, after an interview with Butler he allowed him, at his earn
Jackson, Oct. 28. 1833, lbid.) ; Jackson warns Butler against employing corrupt means (Jackson to Butler, Nov. 27. Ibid.) : Butler insists that "resort must be had to bribery." or "presents if the term is more appropriate" (Butler to Jackson, Feb. 6, 1834. Ibid.). Later Butler writes McLane that ''bribery and corruption" are the sole means of bringing the negotiation to a successful issue. (Butler to McLane, MS., State Department.) Some of these letters are mentioned by Rives.
Butler to Jackson, June 6, 1834. Jackson MSS.; same to same, Oct. 20 (Ibid.). It is interesting to note that Butler thought his negotiations for Texas had been thwarted by Stephen F. Austin whom he charged in a letter to McLane with being "one of the bitterest foes to our government and people that is to be found in Mexico." Butler to McLane, July 13, 1834. MS., State Department.
"Butler to Forsyth. June 17, 1835 (MS., State Department). See also Rives, as cited, I,'257-258.
"Butler to Forsyth, June 17 (quoted also in Reeves, 73-74).
"It is endorsed, "... Nothing will be countenanced to bring the government under the remotest imputation of being engaged in corruption or bribery ... A. J." See also Adams, Memoirs, XI, 348; and Rives, I. 258.

est solicitation, to return to his post in Mexico.80 Before Butler left, however, the suggestion he had thrown out with regard to "higher California" received additional impulse from another source. On August 1, William A. Slacum, a purser in the United States Navy, wrote a letter to the President which, according to Adams, "kindled the passion of Andrew Jackson for the thirtyseventh line of latitude from the river Arkansas to the South Sea, to include the river and bay of San Francisco, and was the foundation of Forsyth's instruction to Butler of 6 August, 1835."40

These instructions mentioned by Adams give the first official attempt of the United States to secure from Mexico any part of her territory on the Pacific. The chief object, as expressed by Forsyth, was to obtain possession of San Francisco Bay which had been "represented to the President"41 as "a most desirable place of resort for our numerous vessels engaged in the whaling business in the Pacific, far superior to any to which they now have access."43 No definite sum which Butler was authorized to offer was specified in the dispatch, but Adams places it as $500,000.48 It should also be noted that Forsyth t.rpressly disclaimed any desire to secure territory south of Sair Francisco.44
It may be added that Butler's presence there was desired neither by Mexicans nor American residents. John Baldwin to Forsyth, Vera Cruz, Nov. 14, 1835. MS., State Department. Miscellaneous Letters." pp. 12-15

Early Sentiment for Annexation of California , Southwestern Historical Quarterly, Volume 18, Texas State Historical Association, Herbert Eugene Bolton, University of Texas at Austin. Center for Studies in Texas History, 1915
http://books.google.com/books?id=lR8UAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA331

"The Butler Papers And A Supplement To The Austin Papers.—Some years ago Colonel Guy M. Bryan, the nephew of Stephen F. Austin, gave the University of Texas the Austin Papers. This rich collection contains the history, as yet unwritten, of the Anglo-American colonization of Texas. Now Mr. Guy M. Bryan, Jr., of Houston, and Mrs. Emmett L. Perry, of Bay City, have increased the obligation of the University to their family by another gift. This consists of certain papers of their great-uncle which were not included in the former gift, of the papers of Colonel Anthony Butler, who was charge d'affaires of the United States at the City of Mexico from 1829 to 1836, and of many rare books, pamphlets, magazines, newspapers, and clippings which deal with the history of Texas.

The additional Austin papers are: a bound account book, covering the years 1825 to 1836, with many of the entries—some of which are of considerable historical and biographical importance— in Austin's own writing; an unbound book of about one hundred pages containing field notes of surveys in Austin's colonies: and fourteen plats of various portions of Austin's several colonies. The Butler Papers may be divided roughly into two classes: (1) diplomatic correspondence, and (2) personal papers. In the diplomatic correspondence there are many dispatches from the State Department at Washington, signed by Secretaries Van Buren, McLane, and Forsyth; copies of many of Butler's notes to the State Department; correspondence between Butler and the Mexican Foreign Office; and finally a number of autograph letters from President Andrew Jackson to Butler. Most of the diplomatic correspondence is prior to 1834. Copies of substantially all of the correspondence with the State Department are to be found at Washington in the department archives and at Mexico in the records of the American Embassy, and copies of the correspondence between Butler and the Mexican Foreign Office are likewise to be had in the Embassy records; but it goes without saying that the possession of autograph copies is of great importance to the University. Perhaps the most valuable documents are the letters of President Jackson. There are nineteen of them, all dealing with the question of the purchase of Texas from Mexico by the United States. There are copies of some of them in the Jackson Manuscripts in the Library of Congress, but some of them appear to be unique. The personal papers give us many important glimpses into the history of Texas and of the United States from 1828 to 1846. Among them are letters from Joel R. Poinsett, General Zachary Taylor, Lucas Alaman, and from many interesting Texas characters of whom we do not know too much, for example Ben Fort Smith and Padre Muldoon. The letters from Poinsett, of which there are thirteen discuss chiefly general political news, with some emphasis on the secession of South Carolina...."p. 331
The Quarterly of the Texas State Historical Association, Volume 14, by Texas State Historical Association
http://books.google.com/books?id=lR8UAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA331#v=onepage&q&f=false

Stephen F. Austin And Anthony Butler: Letters from the Historical Collections of the Rosenberg Library, Galveston, Texas, J. M. Winterbotham, Reprinted from the Mississippi Valley Historical Review Vol. XI, No. 1 June, 1924, 1924

Austin was in debt to Butler (who he knew dating back to 1815) for more than $6,000 from an ill-fated Missouri lead-mining venture. p. 205
O P Q signed letters p. 293
"I have never in all my life known so bad, and base a man as Butler."p. 294
Stephen F. Austin: Empresario of Texas, by Gregg Cantrell, 2001

O. P. Q. LETTERS. The O. P. Q. Letters were two letters, dated January 28 and February 8, 1834, intended to incite the colonists in Texas to insurrection in protest against the arrest and imprisonment of Stephen F. Austin in Mexico. They were written anonymously by Anthony Butler, who, as minister of the United States, was trying to buy Texas and believed that insurrection might induce Mexico to sell. The first was addressed to "Don B. T. A."-Branch T. Archer. The second may, or may not, have been directed to the same address. Both were signed "O. P. Q." Copies of the originals were given to Col. Juan N. Almonte, who visited Texas on an inspection trip in the summer of 1834, and by Almonte forwarded to the government in translation. The originals and the English copies have disappeared. The letters characterized Austin's arrest as a cowardly act of "an ignorant, fanatical and arrogant race" and described Almonte's mission as a cynical attempt to placate the Anglo settlers in Texas. Despite their shrill tone and the worsening political climate, however, the letters apparently caused little excitement in Texas, largely because leading colonists distrusted Butler and because Austin had written letters urging the colonists to remain tranquil. Although initially skeptical, Almonte became convinced that Butler was the author of the letters and suspected that he might be acting on secret instructions from the United States government. In July Almonte wrote to the secretary of foreign relations in Mexico City recommending that his government request Butler's recall. Mexican authorities, however, failed to take action, and Butler was not recalled until the following year, and then only because of President Andrew Jackson's displeasure with his handling of affairs.

BIBLIOGRAPHY: Eugene C. Barker, The Life of Stephen F. Austin (Nashville: Cokesbury Press, 1925; rpt., Austin: Texas State Historical Association, 1949; New York: AMS Press, 1970). Helen Willits Harris, "Almonte's Inspection of Texas in 1834," Southwestern Historical Quarterly 41 (January 1938).
Handbook of Texas Online- O.P.Q. letters
http://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/OO/emo1.html

"Austin had disliked Butler ever since l829, when Butler had made him pay every last cent of an old debt he owed Butler, plus interest..."
Papers Concerning Robertson's Colony in Texas: ...by Malcolm Dallas McLean, 1983

"...In 1828 Stephen F. Austin wrote that Butler was an "unprincipled man" and that Austin anticipated serious difficulties with him. Butler demanded Austin to pay him five or six thousand dollars, expecting returns from the later years of the partnership. In 1835 Austin referred to Butler as the "worst enemy I have in Mexico," and some in Mexico believed that Butler was instrumental in prolonging Austin's imprisonment.  Butler also blamed Austin for influencing the Mexican government to refuse his attaempts at securing the cession of Texas to the United States....Butler's failure, according to historian Andreas Reichstein, was due to his conflict of interests.  He was simultaneoulsy ambassador for the United States and an agent for variousland companies." p. 45
New Orleans and the Texas Revolution, by Edward L. Miller, 2004
http://books.google.com/books?id=LzZrOWnENDwC&printsec=frontcover

Conspiracy Thesis
"Jackson, Anthony Butler and Texas," by Richard Stenberg, in Southwestern Social Science Quarterly, XIII, Dec. 1932. (p. 221?)
"The Texas Schemes of Kackson and Houston, 1829-1836" by Richard Stenberg, in Southwestern Social Science Quarterly, XV, Dec. 1934.

"...As a substitute, the President sent Anthony Butler. Now Jackson had made some pretty ghastly appointments in his time but perhaps few were as spectacularly bad as Butlers. Once inside Mexico this fast-stepping expansionist engineered one shady deal after another to snatch Texas for his chief.  He tried bribery, blackmail, loan-sharking - all to no avail.  When he suggested that the President seize eastern Texas by force and place him "at the head of the country," jackson wrote on the back of the dispatch: "A. Butler: What a scamp." Although the General mouthed pious sentiments about honesty in the negotitations he did nothing to restrain his minister who was as corrupt a negotiator as this nation ever employed in its foreign service. Butler was allowed to remain as minister for nearly seven years - perhaps in the hope that one of his frauds would work and plop Texas into the lap of the President...."p. 211
Andrew Jackson, by Robert Vincent Remini, 1969
http://books.google.com/books?id=dRsjLOXPN94C&printsec=frontcover 

Joe Gibson, " 'A. Butler: What a Scamp!'" Journal of the West 2, 1972, 235-247

"A Diplomatic Disaster: The Mexican Mission of Anthony Butler, 1829-1834," by Quinton C. Lamar, Americas 45, July 1988, 1-18

"Anthony Butler (1774-1848): What a Scamp! Anthony Butler served two terms in the state legislature in South Carolina "p. 105
Saints, scholars & scoundrels: an American family story, by John Graham Cook, 2001

"not content with the damage already done, Butler tarried for two years, among other things, challenging the Mexican secretary of war to a duel and threatening to cane and whip him in public.  He is also alleged to have molested Mexican women.  When ordered to leave the country, he had the effrontery-as well as the good sense- to request an armed guard to escort him to the border."p. 174
From colony to superpower: U.S. foreign relations since 1776, by George C. Herring, 2008
http://books.google.com/books?id=fODT-qOVoiIC&printsec=frontcover

"Butler was even more aggressive in his pursuit of annexation than Jackson and at one point suggested bribing the Mexican government. ("A. Butler: What a scamp."  Jackson wrote on one of Butler's letters.) It is possible-and perhaps probable - that Butler was simply taking the latitude that Jackson himself seemed to suggesr.  "This must be an honest transaction," Jackson had written Butler when describing his duties as envoy, but he went on to say: "I scarcely ever knew a Spaniard who was not the slave of avarice, and it is not improbable that this weakness may be worth a great deal to us, in this case."...Butler told Jackson, the Mexican leader said that he "would in due season chastise us...Yes, sir, he said chastise us."  ...an allusion to 1812, Santa Anna said he would "march to the capital" and "lay Washington city in ashes, as it has already been once done." p. 316
American Lion: Andrew Jackson in the White House, by Jon Meacham, 2009
http://books.google.com/books?id=Ru6O7-Pc_NMC&printsec=frontcover
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Colonel William King (DE)- 3rd Rifle Regiment
Born in Delaware appointed in Maryland.
Second Lt 5th infy 3 May 1808 : First Lt Sept. 1810 : Adjutant 1811 : Captain 15th infy 2 July 1812: Assistant to Inspector Gen. Smith 10 July 1812: commanded expedition from Black Rock to Canada shore, spiking enemy's batteries and capturing prisoners 28 Nov 1812, in which he was wounded and at the end made prisoner: Major 15th infy 3 Mar 1813: commanded his regiment in capture of York Upper Canada 27 Apr 1813: Assistaat Adjutant Gen. (rank Major) 28 Apr 1813: distinguished and wounded in capture of Ft George 27 May 1813 : commanded U. S. troops in concert with N. Y. militia. under BGen Porter in repulsing attack of British troops on Black Rock 11 July 1813: Adjutant General (rank Colonel) 18 July 1813: Colonel 3rd Rifle 1821 Feb. 1814: retained, May 1816, Colonel 4th infy: Military and civil Governor of Pensacola May 1818: disbanded 1 June 1821. Died near Mobile 1 Jan 1826
Andrew Jackson wanted Colonel William King to succeed him as governor of the seized Florida territory in 1819 but President Monroe appointed William DuVal to succeed Andrew Jackson as Governor of Florida, ignoring Jackson's recommendation of Colonel William King for the job. Later, King was brought up on Court Martial charges - the entire trial is available at the American State Papers and provides a fascinating look at Army life circa 1820.
Application of Colonel William King to be restored to his rank in the army.","Restoration of Colonel William King"
American State Papers, House of Representatives, 16th Congress, 1st Session Military Affairs: Volume 2, Pages 139 through 187, No. 195. Trial of Colonel William King.
American State Papers, House of Representatives, 16th Congress, 2nd Session Military Affairs: Volume 2, Page 188, No. 196. Trial of Colonel William King.~No. 197. Reduction of the army.
American State Papers, Senate, 19th Congress, 1st Session Military Affairs: Volume 3, Page 157, No. 286. Application of Colonel William King to be restored to his rank in the army.
American State Papers, Senate, 21st Congress, 2nd Session Military Affairs: Volume 4, Pages 687 through 691,~No. 474. On the application of the widow of Colonel William King, late of the army, who had been suspended by a court-martial, etc., for pay claimed to be due him.
Letter from the secretary of war, transmitting a copy of the proceedings of a court martial, for the trial of Colonel William King, of the Fourth infantry, and sundry orders and documents connected therewith, United States Army, Printed by Gales & Seaton, 1820
http://books.google.com/books?id=8tygAAAAMAAJ&printsec=frontcover
Letters to James Monroe: President of the United States, from William King, by William King, 1820
http://books.google.com/books?id=bcg7K7CuE8EC&printsec=frontcover

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Colonel James Gibson (DE) - 4th Rifle Regiment
Cadet Oct 1806: First Lt Light arty 12 Dec. 1808: Capt May 1810: Assistant inspector general (rank Major) 2 Apr 1813 : Inspector general (rank Colonel) 13 July 1813 : Colonel 4th Rifle. 21 Feb 1814 : mortally wounded in Brown's sortie from Ft Erie 17 Sept and died the 18 Sept 1814.


"To the list of portraits, there have been added, those of the gallant General Jackson, and the lamented Colonel James Gibson, of the United States' rifle corps, who offered up his life, a sacrifice to the rights and honour of his country, in the territory of the enemy, at the onset of the assault upon the British works in Upper Canada, on the 17th of September, 1814. These Portraits, it was impossible to procure in time for the former publication; and to gratify the wishes of many of the subscribers, neither the Author nor the Publisher, have spared either labour or expense to have them executed in the neatest style, and from paintings of the most finished artists." p. v
"It was in the act of storming the 2d battery, and at the head of his detachment, that colonel Gibson received the mortal wound, which, on the following day, closed his military career, and deprived the service of a generous and gallant soldier. He had entered the army as a cadet, at West Point, in 1806; and, by the force and vigour of his military genius, had elevated himself to the rank of captain, at the declaration of war. Between that period and the day on which he fell, at the moment of his triumph over the enemy, he had filled several stations of honour and great responsibility. He had been entrusted with the superintendance of the recruiting district, received the commission of inspector general, and was finally promoted to the command of the 4th rifle regiment. No officer, was held in more general estimation, by the troops; and so distinguished had been his various and gallant services, that a military work, erected near Black Rock, was long since ordered to be called fort Gibson...."pp. 328-329(portrait)
Historical sketches of the late war, between the United States and Great Britain,  By John Lewis Thomson,Published by Thomas Desilver., 1817
http://books.google.com/books?id=GpRPAAAAYAAJ
http://books.google.com/books?id=GpRPAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA328#v=onepage&q&f=false

Gen Winfield Scott's estimation of  Gibson

"...after the blowing up of the bastion and repulse of the assault made by Lieutenant-General Drummond's forces, we find the sortie against the British batteries composed of brigades under General Peter B. Porter made up in part of the 1st and 4th Rifle Regiments (Colonel James Gibson); some dismounted Cavalry and the 21st, and 23d Infantry, under Major Eleazar D. Wood of the Engineers.
In the gallant and successful achievement of the purpose of the sortie, both Colonel James Gibson, commanding the Riflemen and Bvt. Lieutenant-Colonel E. D. Wood, commanding the regulars, were killed." p.421
Journal of the Military Service Institution of the United States, Volume 35, 1904
http://books.google.com/books?id=QJhBAAAAYAAJ&printsec=frontcover

"...distinguished for his services in the War of 1812, was born in South Milford, Sussex County, and died September 18, 1814, from injuries received in Brown's sortie from Fort Erie the previous day. He was made a captain May 2, 1810, and was appointed assistant inspector-general April 2, 1813, being promoted July 13th the same year to the office of inspector-general, with the rank of colonel. On February 21, 1814, was attached to the Fourth Rifles as colonel. Col. Gibson participated particularly in the attack on Queenstown Heights, October 13, 1812, and in the campaign on the Niagara frontier in 1814." -
http://www.accessible.com/amcnty/DE/Delaware/Delaware16.htm

"In note ix, page 30, of the Eichholtz biography, is a letter from a Legislative Committee of Delaware, directing a painting for the State Capitol of Col. John Gibson, in action at Erie. I have learned that this work was executed as proposed and furnished the Delaware Commonwealth, and re mains now, after more than eighty years, one of the art treasures of the State House.
According to the Delaware Legislative Journal, a joint resolution to havp this portraint printed was adopted by the General Assembly February 6, 1822. The subject was suggested by the fact that Colonel James Gibson was a native of Delaware, and fell in defense of his country at the memorable sortie at Lake Erie, September 17, 1814. The committee appointed uider the resolution was somewnat tardy, and the matter was renewed on February 16, 1829, when a new committee was appointed and $120 appropriated for the purpose. No further record is made of the committee's work or report, but the picture was procured and paid for. The portrait is three-quarter length, in uniform with sword, and is in fairly good condition. Gibson was born in Sussex county, Delaware. He joined the regular army and was absent from his native Commonwealth most of his life."
Papers read before the Lancaster County Historical Society,Volumes 17-18, Lancaster County Historical Society (Pa.), 1913
http://books.google.com/books?id=0iQUAAAAYAAJ&printsec=frontcover


 "85 Army, 4th Rifles; solid; flat; bronze; 20. Like No. 84 except figure "4" in curve of horn...
From Niagara frontier. Like the 2nd and 3rd Rifles this regiment existed from 1814 to 1815 when it was consolidated with the others into the "Regiment of Riflemen." With the 1st Rifles it took part in the defense of Fort Erie and detachments from the two regiments under Col. James Gibson of the 4th Rifles headed one column in the sortie on the British lines, Sept. 17, 1814, when Col. Gibson was mortally wounded."p.16
The Emilio collection of military buttons: American, British, French and Spanish..., by Essex Institute (Salem MA,, Luis Fenollosa Emilio
http://books.google.com/books?id=L3kuAAAAYAAJ&printsec=frontcover&output=text


"Born in Delaware in 1781, James Gibson entered the US Military Academy in 1806, before a formal class system had been instituted. cadets matriculated at their own pace, and Gibson completed his course of study in two years, graduating in 1808.  upon graduation, he immediately received a commission as a lieutenant of the Light Artillery regiment.  By May 1810, he had achieved the rank of captain. When war started with Great Britain, Captain Gibson saw early action on the Niagara Frontier.  At the battle of Queenston on 13 October 1812, he was among the regulars trapped on the Canadian side of the river who surrendered to
the British.  many of these stranded Americans were being killed by Indian allies of the British.  Attempts at
surrender thus inviting only murder, Gibson, accompanied Lt. Col. Winfield Scott and capt. Joseph Totten, carrying a sword on which was tied Totten's white cravat.  While trying to find a British officer to whom they could surrender the U.S. army, the three were accosted by two warriors.  The officers fought off the Indians with their swords until British soldiers effected a rescue.  the three Americans were then allowed to surrender to British protection their remaining countrymen. Within a few months, Gibson had been exchanged and in April 1813 was promoted to major.  Again on the Niagara Frontier, Gibson earned the rapid promotion typical of wartime and by July 1813 had become a colonel and was appointed the inspector general of the Ninth Military District.  Occupying that position until February 1814, when he became the colonel and commander of the Fourth Rifle regiment, Gibson was in the Northern Army's Left Division as the campaign
season of 1814 began.  By summer's end, Gibson's Fourth Riflemen made up part of the Fort Erie garrison...." pp. 210-211
Encyclopedia of the War Of 1812, David Stephen Heidler, Jeanne T. Heidler, Naval Institute Press, 2004
http://books.google.com/books?id=_c09EJgek50C&lpg=PP1&pg=PA210#v=onepage&q&f=false


"James Gibson (1784–1814) of Delaware. A highly accomplished officer, Gibson was slain at the sortie from Fort Erie on September 17, 1814. He was the highest-ranking Army officer killed in the bloody 1814 Niagara Campaign." p. 69
The Regulars, The War of 1812 in Person: Fifteen Accounts by United States Army Regulars, by John C. Fredriksen, 2010

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Colonel James McDonald (OH) - original US Regiment of Riflemen - 1st Rifle Regiment - 4th Rifle Regiment
Captain Rifle, 3 May 1808: Major 1 Aug. 1812: Lt colonel 1st Rifle, 24 Jan 1814 : distinguished in Brown's sortie from Ft Erie, commanding the column on the fall of Gibson : Colonel 4th Rifle 17 Sept 1814 : retained, May 1816, as Lt colonel 7th infy, with brevet of Colonel : resigned 30 Apr. 1817
History of the clan Donald, the families of MacDonald, McDonald and McDonnell, by Henry James Lee, p.99
http://books.google.com/books?id=ca9CAAAAYAAJ&printsec=frontcover
Washington, December 30th, 1808.
" Sir, - Three thousand bushels of grain will be ready for you at Newport [KY]. You are therefore, to be prepared to receive and transport it, to New Orleans ; and you are under your command and particular orders, all the troops at that place, which may be ready to descend the river with you. Among these, I expect you will find, Cutler's company of the 7th infantry, and Macdonald's of the rifle corps. I need not suggest to you, the expediency of keeping a tight rein of subordination, over these recruits, and to enforce the strictest police. Wishing you an agreeable voyage, I remain, Sir, Your obedient servant, (Signed) JAMES WILKINSON.
Captain Peter, light Artillery."p. 550
Memoirs of my own times,Vol II, by James Wilkinson,printed by Abraham Small., 1816
http://books.google.com/books?id=_U4FAAAAYAAJ&printsec=frontcover
"The August 24, 1810, edition of the Democratic Clarion and Tennessee Gazette, Nashville, Tennessee, reported this news item: "By a gentleman from Muscle Shoals we have learned that Captain James McDonald's and Captain John Regan's[Ragan] companies [both Rifle Regiment]  had arrived at the Rifle Company[?] a few miles from the mouth of Elk River, from the cantonment [Cantonment Washington] near Natchez. They were at present from the command of Major John Fuller[Rifle Regiment]; but Coloenel Purdy from Hiwassee was expected there in a few days...The object for assembling soldiers is conjectured to be twofold: first to remove intruders on the Indian lands, and secondly to open a road to the Tombigbee...To effect the first object, Lieutenant Thomas Ramsey[Rifle Regiment]  has left notices at several public places among the settlers requiring them to move off the land by the 15th of December next, otherwise the military were ordered to drive them off at the point of the bayonet..." p.220
A Walk Through the Past - People and Places of Florence and Lauderdale, by William Lindsey McDonald, 1997, Heart of Dixie Publishing, 2003, p. 220
http://books.google.com/books?id=HXPa7_F5c1cC&lpg=PA220

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

*Colonel Talbot Chambers (PA) - 4th Rifle Regiment - postwar Rifle Regiment - Last Colonel*
First Lt 5th infy 18 June 1808 : Capt Oct 1811 : Ast adjutant gen. (rank Major) 2 Apr. 1813: wounded at Chrystler's Fields 11 Nov. 1813: Major 4th Rifles 21 Feb 1814: brevet Lt Colonel for gallantry conducted in sortie from Ft Erie 17 Sept 1814: retained May 1815 in Rifle. : Lt colónel 8 May 1817: Colonel 10 Nov. 1818 : retained, May 1821, in 1st infy: dismissed 28 Apr. 1826.
"Colonel Talbot Chambers was appointed to the army from Pennsylvania about ten years before this time. At the close of the War of 1812 he was sent west to command at Mackinac. In the summer of 1816 he accompanied the troops to Green Bay to establish Fort Howard and commanded here for one winter. He was transferred to Prairie du Chien early in 1817, remaining until the spring of 1818. At Prairie du Chien he acquired an unenviable reputation for despotic conduct. He was dismissed from the army in 1826—according to one account for cutting off a soldier's ears—and entered the Mexican service, where he opposed his former countrymen in the war of 1846-48."
"Life in Wisconsin One Hundred Years Ago," Wisconsin magazine of history, Volume 3, by State Historical Society of Wisconsin, 1920, p. 353
http://books.google.com/books?id=aIEUquxtDMIC&pg=PA353

Inspector general Colonel Arthur Perenneau Hayne described him as "An attentive, valuable & competent Officer" and was effusive in praise of Chambers throughout other parts of his report in 1819: "...The Rifle Corps is the only description of Troops that have manned this Dept. - It will be admitted, when their sitation is contrasted with other Regiments of the Army, that they have laboured under many disadvantages. They have not only been disposed by Companies, the natural consequence of their occupyng such an extensive a Depart' but they have been deployed on fortificationas & other incessant tho' indispensible fatigue duty, without any manner of respit or relaxation. In addition to this, they have existed in the Want of a system of Drill, calculated for that particular Arm of an Army. But every exertion has been resorted to by Col Chambers to remedy this defect. He has devised a system of File Movements predicated on the movements of Light Infantry, & which he has practiced whenever circumstances would permit. They are taught to perform their evoultion by Bugle Signals. The firing at the Target has been constantly practiced. The Interior economy & police of the Regiment is excellant - & as soon as concentration is effected, this Regiment will perform all it's Movements, with that Celerity & Promptitude which ever ought to characterize Riflemen - Col Chambers is a faithful & vigilant Officer; - none more so in our Army; - & is in every respect acquainted with their duty. The Field & Company officers are generally acquainted with their Duty. The Adjutants, Quarter Master & Pay Masters are competent to the duties assigned them.
The Provisions have been of good quality.
The Forage sufficient.
Hospital Supplies sufficient.
The Ordnance Department, altho' superintended by an Officer of Talents, Zeal & Industry, has proven in some respects defective.
The Powder Horns for the Regt' are too small, & not water proof.
- Report of Inspection of the Ninth Military Department, 1819 - L. B. S. The Mississippi Valley Historical Review, Vol. 7, No. 3 (Dec., 1920), pp. 261-274 - doi:10.2307/1891224.
The editor L.B.S. commented that "Colonel Chambers had an ignominious ending in 1826, when he was cashiered for drunkenness, although the other charges preferred against him were dismissed." beefore that he had an earlier trial.
http://books.google.com/books?id=iToOAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA266#v=onepage&q&f=false


""Missouri Gazette and Public Advertiser"
"June 2. Notes that the St. Louis, from New Orleans, arrived on the 1st instant, Colonel Atkinson and Major M'Intosh, passengers.
"June 23.
"Col. Chambers, with part of the Rifle corps, left Belle Fontaine on the 14th inst. to proceed to Martin's cantonment, up the Missouri."
"It is understood that the Sixth Regiment will proceed from Belle Fontaine up the Missouri in five or six days."
July 14
"Col. Atkinson commanding the expedition and who now commands this department and Capt. Smith of the Rifle regiment, Assistant Adjutant General, proceed up by land and join the fleet at or near Franklin."
"Col. Chambers, with part of the Rifle regiment arrived at Franklin on the 26th June."
July 21. " From the Missouri Intelligencer.''
"Franklin, (Boonslick) July 2d, 1819.
"We announce with great satisfaction the arrival here, this day, of five large Keel Boats, with 260 troops, exclusive of officers, being a part of the expedition destined for the Yellow Stone. Our citizens were apprised of their approach by the firing of swivels from on board the boats, and every demonstration of joy and satisfaction was manifested at an event, the successful result of which, promises such important advantages, as well to this portion of the country as to the nation at large."
Colonel Talbott Chambers, Captain James S. Gray, Lieutenant Scott, Lieutenant Keith and Doctor Malone were the officers who came with the troops.
pp. 24-26
"YELLOWSTONE EXPEDITION,"NOTES OF THE EARLY HISTORY OF THE NEBRASKA COUNTRY, Publications - Nebraska State Historical Society, Volume 20, by Nebraska State Historical Society, 1922
http://books.google.com/books?id=MJ0UAAAAYAAJ&printsec=frontcover


"Fort Crawford, Wisconsin
Sept. 16, 1816 - Concerning the arbitrary acts of Gen. Smith and Col. Chambers, one of the pioneers, James H. Lockwood, says:..."During the winter of 1816 or early in the spring of 1817, Lieut. Col. Talbot Chambers arrived at Fort Crawford, and assumed the command, and the houses in the village being an obstruction to the garrison, in the spring of 1817, he ordered those houses in front and about the fort to be taken down by their owners, and removed to the lower end of the village, where he pretended to give them lots...the officers of the army treated the inhabitants as a conquered people, and the commandants assumed all the authority of governors of a conquered country, arraigning and trying the citizens by courts-martial and sentencing them to ignominious punishments. This was more particularly the case under the reign of Col. Chambers, who was a brave soldier in the field, but a weak man and not qualified for a commandant, as he was generally governed by some favorite officer or officers, who, not being responsible for the outrage committed by their superior, would induce him to do acts to gratify their whims or prejudices."
Collections, Volumes 1-2, y State Historical Society of Wisconsin,1855  p.128
http://books.google.com/books?id=5_ZrcSclJ5UC&pg=RA1-PA128

EARLY TIMES AND EVENTS IN WISCONSIN BY HON JAMES H LOCKWOOD OF PRAIRIE DU CHIEN, Collections, Volumes 1-2, y State Historical Society of Wisconsin,1855  p.98
http://books.google.com/books?id=0mwOAAAAIAAJ&pg=RA1-PA98

[1817]
"Aug. 31* Sabbath—A general muster of the garrison, being the last day of the month about 200 riflemen commanded by Col. Chambers," they appear to be well dissiplined—the fort is about 50 yards square, composed of barracks built of hewn logs, with two block houses at opposite corners, mounting several small pieces of artillery—Called Fort "Crawford."....
Oct 19th Sabbath—Pleasant weather—At 1/2 past 8 in the Evening a messenger at full speed gave an alarm that the Indians had attacked the town directing us to make the best of our way to the fort—our firearms were all absent, or out of order we immediately concluded to flee—at the same instant the Indian whistle began to sound (the signal for attack) we rushed out were fired upon, and the war-whoop commencd we scatered retreted to the hills, finding ourselves not pursued, collected our company together and found two missing
after a long consultation we, from various reasons concluded it to be a false alarm, created by some evil disposed, drunken, lowlived persons— we cautiously returned to our cabin, where we found one of our men who in retreating a different way was driven back—and one man lay in the woods all night
Oct 20th—The Indian exploit of last night was performed by the officers of the garrison and some of the principal citizens, led on by the Col.—who came up today to excuse the matter—to palliate the unwarrantable act he said we were too earless in not being well armed, and being too far from the fort for protection he had adopted that plan as the only method of bringing us to our sense of duty."

"A JOURNAL OF LIFE IN WISCONSIN ONE HUNDRED YEARS AGO , KEPT BY WILLARD KEYES OF NEWFANE VERMONT " Wisconsin magazine of history, Volume 3, by State Historical Society of Wisconsin, 1920, pp. 354-355
http://books.google.com/books?id=aIEUquxtDMIC&pg=PA354


"To James Monroe.
Department of War 18 June 1821
Dr SIR, More recent information from the Havannah has rendered it unnecessary, in the opinion of members of the administration, to come to any decision on the points presented by your letter of the 13th instant. No further delay is feared in passing the possession of the Provinces into our hands. I return the copy of the letter to Mr Adams as you requested.
I have received the proceedings of the Court Martial in the case of Col. Chambers, which I herewith enclose. He has been found guilty of the charge preferred against him, and has been sentenced to be suspended for one month, which however, the Court recommends to be remitted. The sentence would seem to be very inadequate to the Offence; and altho' there are mitigating circumstances, I doubt not, the punishment will be thought to be very inadequate by the community. I regret, that so correct an Officer, as Genl Smith was thought to be, should have set the example of such illegal and odious punishment; and that a knowledge of it had not then reached the Government, so that our immediate check might have been put to it. The truth appears to be, that the Officers of the Army, at the end of the War, had a very erroneous mode of thinking, as well on this, as many other points,, which took some years to correct. I believe the establishment is now thoroughly reformed of most of the faults, which grew out of the incidents of the. War. I propose however, to order a Summary Statement of all proceedings of Courts Martial and punishments inflicted on the soldiers to be transmitted to the Office of the Adjutant Genl. so that the government may at once check any abuse which may appear. I do not doubt, but that the example of Genl Smith, and the supposed necessity of the case were the real cause of Col Chamber's improper, and illegal conduct......
1 From H1-- Monroe Papers Department of State; text from an official copy
2 Of Florida."
Letter from Sec War Calhoun to President Monroe, Correspondence of John C. Calhoun By John Caldwell Calhoun, John Franklin Jameson, "Account of Calhoun's early life, abridged from the manuscript of Col. W. Pinkney Starke" pp. 188-189

Later, Chambers, as Commander of the 1st Infantry, was court martialed in 1826. The actual record can be found starting at American State Papers [Military Affairs: Volume 3] : Index
TABLE OF CONTENTS.
330. Communicating the proceedings of a court-martial for the trial of Colonel Talbot Chambers 1826, May 16 ... 307
There is also book available: www.tomfolio.com/bookssub.asp?subid=124

Message From The President Of The United States With A Report From The Secretary of War, and Proceedings of a Court Martial For The Trial Of Col. Talbot Chambers, &c. Publisher: Gales & Seaton. Washington 1826. ....In compliance with a resolution of the Senate of the 28th April, 1826....May 10, 1826., Printed by order of the Senate of the United States...47pp....19th Congress, 1st Session....Doc. No. 93...
Colonel Talbot Chambers was the Commanding Officer in the Creek Nation in 1825. At one point Zachary Taylor reported to him but he was courtmartialed for apparently being drunk on his watch many times. He was found guilty and cashiered out of the Army in 1826, which sentence was approved by President Adams....contains introductory note written by John Quincy Adams.

note - At the 1826 court martial of Colonel Talbot Chambers, Commander of the 1st Infantry,  a principal accuser was Capt James Gale, not to be confused with ex Rifleman Surgeon John Gale.

------------------------------LIEUTENANT COLONELS----------------------------------------------

Lieutenant Colonel Daniel Appling (GA) - original US Regiment of Riflemen - 1st Rifle Regiment
(born 1787, Columbia cy. Geo) Sec Lt Rifle. 3 May 1808: First Lt July 1809: Captain Apr 1812: Major 1st Rifle. 16 Apr. 1814: bvt Lieut colonel 30 May 1814 (Aug 1814) "for gallant conduct in capturing n superior force of the enemy in Sandy Creek N. Y. : bvt Colonel 11 Sept 1814 (Doc. 1814) for distinguished, service at Plattsburg: retained. May 1815, in 7th infy: resigned 1 June 1816 [Died at Ft Montgomery Ala Mar. 1817.]

"Appling was born in Columbia County, Georgia, to John and Rebecca (Carter) Appling. In 1805, at the age of 18, he enlisted in the United States Army with a lieutenancy under General Thomas A. Smith, of Franklin, Missouri. Appling was a recruiting officer for some time, but was then stationed at Fort Hawkins, near Macon, Georgia. He was also stationed at Point Peter on St. Mary’s River in Georgia, where Fort Pickering would be built during the War of 1812, and a command on Amelia Island in Florida. On 1 July 1809, Appling was promoted to 1st lieutenant, and on 1 April 1812 he was promoted to captain. During the late war, Appling was ordered to Sackets Harbor in New York. On the rainy evening of May 28, 1814, Major Appling and 150 of his riflemen set out from Oswego under the command of Melancthon Taylor Woolsey on 19 boats headed for Sackets Harbor. Loaded onto the boats were cables and cannons needed to outfit two brigs, the Jones and the Jefferson, and a frigate, the Superior. The secret mission was detected, and the Americans withdrew up the Big Sandy Creek to fortify their position. On the morning of May 30, a large British force, disobeying an order to pursue American forces inland from the Lake, engaged the Americans. Major Appling had hidden his forces in the brush and trees along the banks of the Creek, and surprised the British. The Battle of Big Sandy Creek lasted less than 15 minutes and resulted in an overwhelming American victory. The Americans captured 143 prisoners (133 men and 10 officers), 20 wounded (28 men and 2 officers), 14 killed (13 men and one officer), three gun-boats, one with a 24-pounder and a 63-pounder, two cutters, and one gig. The supplies loaded on Woolsey’s boats were safely carried over land by oxen to Sackets Harbor. One of the cables, reported to be 600 feet long, 6 inches thick, and 9,600 pounds, had to be carried by hand, an event known as the Great Cable Carry. On 30 May 1814, Appling was brevetted lieutenant colonel for gallant conduct in capturing a superior force of the enemy at the Battle of Big Sandy Creek Creek. After the Battle of Big Sandy Creek, Major Appling was stationed at Plattsburgh, New York and successfully led his riflemen against General (Sir George) Prevost’s attack. For his distinguished service there, he was promoted to colonel on 11 September 1814. On 1 June 1816, he resigned from the military. After resigning, he moved to Montgomery County, Alabama. The Georgia Legislature awarded Appling a sword in recognition of the efforts during the War of 1812. Unfortunately, before the sword could be delivered, Appling died on March 5, 1817, at the age of 30. The sword now hangs in the Executive Room in Milledgeville, Georgia. Appling County, Georgia was named for Daniel Appling on December 15, 1818. - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Daniel_Appling

"Daniel Appling was bom in Colombia County, Georgia, in 1787, and entered the army as second lieutenant of riflemen in 1808. He was promoted to captain in the spring of 1812, and major of the First Rifle Corps. In April, 1814. For his gallant conduct at Sandy Creek (Battle on Big Sandy Creek) he was breveted lieutenant colonel in August. He was breveted colonel for distinguished services at Plattsburg In September following. He was retained on the peace establishment in 1815, but resigned In June the following year. He died at Montgomery, Alabama, in March, 1817, at the age of only thirty years." p. 800
- The pictorial field-book of the war of 1812 by Benson John Lossing, 1868
http://books.google.com/books?id=okh7K53m_BIC&pg=PA800#v=onepage&q&f=false

see Chapters 6 and 8 in Florida Fiasco: Rampant Rebels on the Georgia-Florida Border, 1810-1815, by Rembert W. Patrick, 1954, University of Georgia Press, 2010
http://books.google.com/books?id=JWc3cvE0Kk0C&printsec=frontcover
The Other War of 1812: The Patriot War and the American Invasion of Spanish, by James G. Cusick, 2007
http://books.google.com/books?id=BxHE3OsgU9EC&printsec=frontcover
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Lieutenant Colonel Henry B. Armstrong (NY) - 4th Rifle Regiment - 1st Rifle Regiment
son of BGen. John A. Armstrong - Capt 13th infy 9 Apr 1812: wounded in assault on Queenston Heights 13 Oct 1812: Major 23rd infy 12 Apr 1813: distinguished at Stony Creek 6 June 1813: transferred Mar. 1814, to 4th Rifle, Lt colonel 1st Rifle 17 Sept 1814: disbanded 15 June 1815


----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Lieutenant Colonel George Croghan (KY)- 2nd Rifle Regiment
or Groghan - born 16 Nov 1791, in Kentucky, son of Maj Wim C. of Revolutionary army, and nephew of Gen. Geo. R. Clark, Volunteer Aide de Сamp to Col. Boyd in command of brigade, in battle of Tippecnnoe, Nov. 1811. Capt 17th infy 12 Mar 1812: Major 30 Mar 1813: Aide de Сamp to MGen Harrison, and distinguished in defence of Ft Meigs, and in sortie 5 May 1813 : distinguished in command of Ft Stephenson, Lower Sandusky, in repulsing British and Indians, a greatly superior force, for which he was breveted Lt colonel 2 Aug. 1813 (21 Aug. 1813) : Lt colonel 2nd Rifle. 21 Feb 1814: retained, May 1815, in 1st infy: resigned 31 Mar. 1817. [Postmaster at New Orleans July 1824] Inspector general (rank Colonel) 21 Dec. 1825 : received a gold medal "with suitable emblems and devices," presented "in testimony of the high sense entertained by Congress of his gallantry and good conduct in the defence of Ft Stephenson," 13 Feb. 1835 : died 8 Jan. 1849 at New Orleans.

G. CROGHAN, Major Seventeenth United States Infantry - Hero of the defence of Fort Sandusky/Stephenson - nephew of George Rogers Clark
George Croghan was born near Louisville, Kentucky, on November 15, 1791. His father had served as an officer in the American Revolution, and his mother was a sister of George Rogers Clark. After attending the College of William and Mary in Williamsburg, Virginia, Croghan joined the army in 1811. He quickly saw military service, participating in the Battle of Tippecanoe and the siege of Fort Meigs. Not long after the War of 1812 began, George Croghan became commander of Fort Stephenson. Located on the Sandusky River, the fort was important to Ohio's defense against the British. The fort consisted of three blockhouses inside of a rectangular stockade. Croghan worked hard to increase the fort's defensive capabilities. General William Henry Harrison believed that the fort was located at a precarious position and ordered that Croghan abandon it, but Croghan argued that, if his forces withdrew, Native Americans would cut his men off from the rest of the army. Before the two men could resolve their differences, British troops attacked the fort. Despite the fact that Croghan had only approximately 150 troops under his command, the Americans were successful in holding off the British assault. In fact, Croghan's men were so successful that they crippled the British forces -- not one officer was left standing, and one-fifth of the English soldiers were either killed, wounded, or missing in action. The Americans forced their enemy to withdraw from the area. The victory at Fort Stephenson came at an important time during the war, as the United States had few military successes. In addition to raising American morale, it also made Croghan famous across the country. President James Madison promoted him to the rank of lieutenant colonel as reward for his service. Years later, the United States Congress voted to award him a gold medal for his success during the War of 1812. Croghan continued to serve in the military after the War of 1812 ended.(transfered to 1st Infantry in 1815 - resigned 1817 - Col IG 1825) In 1824, he became postmaster of the city of New Orleans, but the following year he was appointed inspector general of the army. During the Mexican War, Croghan served with General Zachary Taylor. Once the war ended, Croghan was stationed in New Orleans. He died of cholera there on January 8, 1849. Although originally buried in a family cemetery near Louisville, Croghan's remains were removed to the site of Fort Stephenson in 1906, and a granite memorial covered his grave. - http://www.ohiohistorycentral.org/entry.php?rec=65

George Croghan p. 189 -The biography of the principal American military and naval heroes: comprehending details of their achievements during the revolutionary and late wars. Interspersed with authentic anecdotes not found in any other work, by Thomas Wilson, 1822
http://books.google.com/books?id=p18DAAAAYAAJ&printsec=frontcover

Biographical sketch - COLONEL GEORGE CROGHAN - p. 102 Proceedings at the unveiling of the soldiers' monument on the site of Fort Stephenson, Fremont, Ohio, 1885
http://books.google.com/books?id=S-9BAAAAIAAJ&printsec=frontcover

portrait on pages 304-305 History of Ohio: the rise and progress of an American state, Volume 3, 1912
http://books.google.com/books?id=GHkUAAAAYAAJ&printsec=frontcover

"The first task at hand was Machedash Bay, the rumored location of the Naval yard on Georgian Bay. A lack of knowledgeable pilots prevented Sinclair from finding it. He decided to turn back, but not before he burnt the abandoned British fortress on St Joseph, captured a pair of small lakers and then steered for Mackinac, arriving there on the 26th July. Intent on fulfilling his mission, Sinclair and his military colleague Lieutenant Colonel George Groghan [Croghan], landed their force on the opposite side of the Island, hoping to force McDouall to march out to do battle, which he did with about 150 of his troops, supported by the native allies. The dense forest made tactics difficult and the men ran into an Indian ambush. After some brief but deadly exchanges, they retreated and the attack on Mackinac ended (Fredricksen calls this an "embarassing defeat") ..."
http://sinclair.quarterman.org/archive/2002/01/msg00107.html

Croghan - 8 citations in Historical Sketches of the Late War, by John Thomson, 1816
http://books.google.com/books?id=SbcTAAAAYAAJ&printsec=frontcover


AN EPISODE OF THE WAR OF 1812 , Ontario history, Volumes 9-12, by Ontario Historical Society, 1910
http://books.google.com/books?id=RwYVAAAAYAAJ&printsec=frontcover

The Naval War of 1812: a documentary history, Volume 3,by William S. Dudley, Michael J. Crawford, Naval Historical Center, 2003
http://books.google.com/books?id=EUFKtqF_tBMC&printsec=frontcover

"...George Croghan, at whose name the western Indians had often trembled. This was in the year 1826. He was inspector general of the army at the time, and it is probable that his report determined the government to abandon the fort [Atkinson]" p. 27.."The ten sheets of paper forming this address are fastened with clasps exhibiting buttons from the coat and cape of a rifleman's uniform WHE"p. 28
Old Fort Atkinson by W. H. Eller, Transactions and reports of the Nebraska State Historical Society, Volume 4, by Nebraska State Historical Society, 1892
http://books.google.com/books?id=d45uAAAAMAAJ&printsec=frontcover

REPORT UPON THE PROPRIETY OF ABANDONING FORTS ARMSTRONG AND DES MOINES by George Croghan, Inspector General 1825?, p. 495, Annals of Iowa, Volume 8, 1908
http://books.google.com/books?id=VpMUAAAAYAAJ&printsec=frontcover

"...a general lack of military preparedness drove Colonel George Croghan, the army's post inspector general from 1826 to 1845, to apoplectic rage. "Ask an officer at one of those posts what his place is in the event of alarms, and his answer will be, I don't know, no particular one has been assigned to me; we never have alarms, either false or real.  Direct an officer in command to receive an enemy that will attack him in a few minutes, and it will be found that he requires half a day of preparation." p. 8
Frontier forts of Iowa: Indians, traders, and soldiers, 1682-1862, by William E. Whittaker, 2009
http://books.google.com/books?id=vOn5pJb_kpgC&printsec=frontcover

American State Papers, Senate, 23rd Congress, 1st Session Military Affairs: Volume 5, Pages 355 through 356, No. 583. (1834) On granting suitable testimonials to Major George Croghan, and the officers and soldiers under his command, for their gallantry in defending Fort Sandusky in 1813.

"Death Of Colonel George Croghan.- The New Orleans Mercury thus announces the death of this heroic officer, which took place at that city on the 8th inst.:
The brave and gallant soldier, Col. George Croghan whose heroic delence of Fort Sandusky, while but a boy of nineteen years, linked his name forever with those of the great men of whom our country is proud, died last evening, after a short illness. At the lime of his death he was Inspector General of the U. S. Army, which office had held sinee sometime during the administration  oi General Jackson. Our army held no braver man in its ranks.  The chivalry of his youth was not merely that of young and hot blood. At the battle of Monterey, although his position in the army gave him no separate command, he exposed his life with as little apparent thought of danger, as the bravest of that band of heroes, whose duty called them into the thickest of the fight. He was everywhere among the brave volunteers, and his presence was itself a host by the influence it wrought upon the singling army. He remarked afterwards that the hottest fire he had ever been under was at Monterey.
The following particulars are from an article in the Picayune:
Colonel Croghan was the son of Major William Croghan of the revolutionary war. His mother was the sister of the celebrated General George Rogers Clark, who overran the North Western Territory during the struggle for American Independence, and achieved for the United States the title by conquest, by which that immense tract of country, now subdivided into Stales and teeming with a thrifty and hardy population, became a part of this confederacy. Both upon the father and mother's side he inherited the blood of the revolution.
Upon the breaking out of the late war. Colonel Croghan entered the army. At the early age of nineteen he made the gallant defence of Fort Sandusky. By this brilliant feat he inscribed his name upon the scroll of fame. He married and resigned his commission shortly after.the peace. But during the administration of General Jackson he returned to the service with the commission of Inspector General, which was tendered him by that illustrious commander. He held this office up lo the time of his death. He was in his 59th year and leaves behind him a wife and family." p. 64
Niles' weekly register, Volume 75, by Hezekiah Niles, 1849
http://books.google.com/books?id=7fs7AAAAMAAJ&pg=PA64

Locust Grove is a National Historic Landmark on 55 acres of the original 694 acre farm established by William and Lucy Clark Croghan in 1790. 
http://www.locustgrove.org/

Fort Stephenson 
http://www.touring-ohio.com/history/fort-stephenson.html


----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Lieutenant Colonel William Duane (PA) - original US Regiment of Riflemen
Like Colonel Alexander Smyth a political appointee with no military service. On regimental roll from 1808-1810. Newspaper editor of the Philadelphia Aurora - erstwhile writer of "A Handbook for Riflemen" (1812) not accepted by the Army.
"The " Aurora " had a large circulation in its first years, but the actual advent of the Jefferson administration raised competitors, and Duane had a hard struggle to maintain himself by the newspaper. He sought aid again and again from Jefferson, Madison, and Monroe, of whose cause he regarded himself the champion. Having suffered in the " reign of terror," — the Republican name for the administration of John Adams, — and having been persecuted by the Senate for his writings, he looked to his patrons for rewards adequate to his own idea of the debt. His wish to obtain government contracts for printing and stationery met with the approval even of Gallatin, who was personally above any suspicion of wrong intent....
As his financial troubles became worse, his temper became more uncertain and irascible. No one appeared to trust him, his friends fearing him quite as much as did his enemies, and never knowing the day when he would turn upon them and abuse them with the knowledge he had gained in their intercourse. He criticised Madison and opposed Monroe; he fought Gallatin for reasons which had little foundation and were peculiarly exasperating to Gallatin's friends. His course in State politics was marked by a personal and intemperate bias that made him feared and hated. He was on the losing side, and the " Aurora" became less and less influential and profitable, and ceased to be the organ of Republicanism. Jefferson remained his friend, seeking opportunities to aid him, and Duane remained loyal to Jefferson ; yet even Jefferson recognized his errors. He wrote in 1811: " I believe Duane ! to be a very honest man, and sincerely republican; but his passions are stronger than his prudence, and his personal as well as general antipathies render him very intolerant." Thirteen years worked no change, and Duane transferred his pen to the aid of the opponents of the Republicans." pp. 258-259
Worthington C. Ford, ed., “The Letters of William Duane,” Massachusetts Historical Society Proceedings 20 (1906–1907)
http://books.google.com/books?id=XBoXAAAAIAAJ&printsec=frontcover

"Pennsylvania has been for about twenty years governed by two newspapers in succession : one, the Aurora, edited by Duane, an Irishman, and the other, the Democratic Press, edited by John Binns, an Englishman. Duane had been expelled from British India for sedition, and Binns had been tried in England for high treason. They are both men of considerable talents and profligate principles, always for sale to the highest bidder, and always insupportable burdens, by their insatiable rapacity, to the parties they support. With the triumph of Jefferson, in 1801, Duane, who had contributed to it, came in for his share, and more than his share, of emolument and patronage. With his printing establishment at Philadelphia he connected one in this city; obtained by extortion almost the whole of the public printing, but, being prodigal and reckless, never could emerge from poverty, and, always wanting more, soon encroached upon the powers of indulgence to his cravings which the heads of Departments possessed, and quarrelled both with Mr. Madison and Mr. Gallatin for staying his hand from public plunder. In Pennsylvania, too, he contributed to bring in McKean, and then labored for years to run him down—contributed to bring in Snyder, and soon turned against him. Binns in the mean time had come, after his trial, as a fugitive from England, and had commenced editor of a newspaper. Duane had been made by Mr. Madison a Colonel in the army; and as Gibbon, the Captain of Hampshire Militia, says he was useful to Gibbon, the historian of the Roman Empire, so Duane, the Colonel, was a useful auxiliary to Duane, the printer, for fleecing the public by palming upon the army, at extravagant prices, a worthless compilation upon military discipline that he had published. But before the war with England was half over, Duane had so disgusted the army and disgraced himself that he was obliged to resign his commission, and has been these seven years a public defaulter in his accounts, to the amount of between four and five thousand dollars, for which he is now under prosecution...."pp. 116-117
Memoirs of John Quincy Adams: comprising portions of his diary ..., Volume 5, by John Quincy Adams, 1875
http://books.google.com/books?id=kFkSAAAAYAAJ&printsec=frontcover

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 

Lieutenant Colonel Benjamin Forsyth (NC) - original US Regiment of Riflemen - 1st Rifle Regiment
Second Lt 6th infy 24 Apr and disbanded June 1800: Capt Rifle 1 July 1808 : commended in victorious assault on Gananoque, Upper Canada (U.C.) 21 Sept. 1812: Major 20 Jan. 1813: commended in capturing a British, guard at Elizabetbtown, U. C. 7 Feb. 1813, for which brevet Lt colonel 6 Feb. 1813 (Apr. 1814): distinguished in capture of Ft George U. C. 27 May 1813 : [Lt colonel 46th infy 15 Apr. 1814—declined.] Killed 28 June 1814 in affair at Odelltown, N. Y. with a superior force of British and Indians.
Originally from Stokes County, North Carolina, he obtained a lieutenancy in the U.S. 1st Rifle Regiment when it was formed in 1808. By the time the War broke out, he had risen to the rank of Captain and commanded a company. Based at Ogdensburg, New York during the autumn and winter of 1812, he led the successful Raid on Gananoque, and other attacks across the Saint Lawrence River, which threatened the British supply lines to their forces in Upper Canada. In February 1813, the British used a temporary superiority in strength to drive Forsyth from his positions at the Battle of Ogdensburg. Forsyth's company was ordered to join the main American force at Sackett's Harbor rather than reoccupy Ogdensburg. They led the American assault at the Battle of York, and played a major part at the Battle of Fort George. Later in the year, Forsyth (now a major) and his men took part in the campaign aimed at capturing Montreal, but were not present at the Battle of Crysler's Farm. Forsyth was promoted to brevet Lieutenant Colonel the following winter. He was active in skirmishing and patrolling north of Lake Champlain in the late spring and summer and was killed in June in a clash at Odelltown. His death made him a hero to the people of North Carolina. Because of this, North Carolinians named a county after him; Forsyth County. The state General Assembly paid for his son's education through special legislation, as well. They also gave his son a jewelled sword. Forsyth Street in Manhattan, New York City is also named for him. - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Benjamin_Forsyth
"Benjamin Forsyth of North Carolina originally entered the army as a second lieutenant of the 6th Infantry Apr. 24th, 1800, but was very soon honorably discharged. He was reappointed as a captain of Rifles July 1st, 1808; became major Jan. 2oth, 1813, and was brevetted lieutenant-colonel for distinguished services Feb. 6th, 1813. He was killed in action at Odelltown, N. Y., June 28th, 1814. " The death of this officer was in harmony with his character. After the taking of York, finding that the official account of the action gave him little credit for the conspicuous share he had in it, he became sick and inactive, and kept himself in sullen seclusion among his own men, apparently determined that no services should be rendered, either by himself or his men, since they were so inadequately rewarded, or so unduly estimated. He did little or nothing the residue of that campaign. Having been promoted before the following campaign, he, on the Champlain frontier, was put in command of an advanced party, which was to engage the enemy and then fall back, in order to draw him into an ambush. Lieutenant-Colonel Forsyth was the last man who was likely to fulfill such a plan. As soon as he opened the fight with the enemy, his instructions to fall back were either forgotten or ignored. His spirit could not brook a retreat, even for an ultimate advantage. He rushed on and fell, and lost, with his life, all the success that would probably have followed more prudence, or strict obedience to orders."pp. lxxxvi-lxxxvii
 (Whiting, /. c.)
The Expeditions of Zebulon Montgomery Pike: Memoir of the author, by Zebulon Montgomery Pike, Elliott Coues, 1895
http://books.google.com/books?id=VOstAAAAYAAJ&printsec=frontcover&source=gbs_ge_summary_r&cad=0
17 entries in Lossing's The pictorial field-book of the war of 1812
includes section heading Death of Forsyth
Forsyth's Raiders, by Sarah McCulloh Lemmon, Frustrated Patriots: North Carolina and the War of 1812, (University of North Carolina Press, Chapel Hill, 1973)

Lieutenant Colonel William Southerland. Hamilton (NC) - 3rd Rifle Regiment - postwar Rifle Regiment
First Lt 3rd infy 1 July 1808 : Aide de Сamp to ВGen Hampton 1811 : resigned 1 Nov 1812. Major 10th infy 8 Mar 1813 : Assistant inspector general (rank Major) 4 Mar 1815: Lt colonel 3rd Rifle 21 Feb 1814: retained May 1815 in Rifle : resigned 8 Mar 1817
"...It will be noted, that of the two or three discontents, referred to by Captain Ragan, Captain Scott, Of The Artillery, was one, who has since been disgraced by a general court martial, and Lieutenant Hamiiton, another, a beardless youth, who, it is notorious to the whole army, was cherished by me, as sedulously as if he had been my own son, because I discovered in him, genius and capacity, and believed he might be made a useful officer. His merits have been discovered, by Brigadier-general Hampton also, who has selected him as his aid-de-camp; I will not say by way of reward for his ingratitude to me, and for his traduction of my character, in which he has been loud and indecent...."p.518
Memoirs of my own times,Vol II, by James Wilkinson,printed by Abraham Small., 1816
http://books.google.com/books?id=_U4FAAAAYAAJ&printsec=frontcover
"US Army Major William S. Hamilton was appointed to the rank of Colonel and placed in charge of recruiting in the state of North Carolina. He considered the War of 1812 to be a golden opportunity for those with "a pure spirit and a sacred impulse." He promised to equip volunteers in "Rifle dress and give you your favorite weapon, and ... you will cover youselves with glory." The pay ranged from $8-$12 per month, plus a $124 bounty for enlisting and 160 acres of free land when the war was over. Newspapers across the state printed reports of volunteers on their way to a rendezvous prior to marching off to war..In January of 1815, Colonel Hamilton was at last released from recruiting duties in North Carolina and stationed in Fredericksburg, Virginia, to winter before going north in the spring. His troops were not needed, however, since the treaty of peace had just been signed."
North Carolina - The War of 1812 The Known Military Units from North Carolina
http://www.carolana.com/NC/1800s/antebellum/war_of_1812_military_units.html
Frustrated Patriots: North Carolina and the War of 1812, by Sarah McCulloh Lemmon,, (University of North Carolina Press, Chapel Hill, 1973)
"Uniform Coat, 3rd United States Rifle Regiment, War of 1812-1815, Original loaned by Mrs. Susan H. Bienvenu. Photo courtesy of Timothy Pickles. This coat is a reproduction of the one worn by Lt. Colonel W.S. Hamilton in the War of 1812." - http://lsm.crt.state.la.us/cabildo/cabildo.htm
"Papers of John Hamilton (1784-1822) and his son, W. S. Hamilton, pertaining to J. Hamilton's study of law in Scotland, his move to the United States, his life in Edenton and Elizabeth City, N.C., as a lawyer, state legislator, and active Baptist, and his move to Louisiana; and to W. S. Hamilton's study at Princeton College, his friendship and correspondence with Samuel Stanhope Smith, president of Princeton, his service as a United States Army officer, 1808-1817, chiefly in Louisiana under General Wade Hampton (1754-1835), and his controversy with his father and stepmother over property due him from his mother's estate. Volumes, 1785- 1802, are irregular diaries and brief memoranda books of J. Hamilton. Also available are military papers and orderly books of W. S. Hamilton and his later papers as a planter and legislator in Louisiana; correspondence with his sons, especially Douglas M. and William B. Hamilton, students in Louisiana and at the University of Virginia and soldiers in the Confederate Army in Virginia; and a Louisiana cotton plantation journal, 1861-1862."
Collection Title: W. S. Hamilton Papers, 1770-1888; 1924. University of North Carolina Libraries collection:
"HAMILTON, William Sutherland, planter, politician. Born, Edenton, N. C., April 3, 1789; son of John and Angel Hamilton. Educated at Princeton. Aide-de-camp to Gen. Wade Hampton (q.v.), 1812-1816, with rank of lieutenant colonel. Married Eliza Stewart, daughter of Duncan Stewart and Penelope Jones of Wilkinson County, Miss. Planter, West Feliciana Parish, La. Member first board of trustees, College of Louisiana, Jackson, 1825; served in Louisiana legislature, 1828-1830; unsuccessful gubernatorial candidate, 1830. Died prior to April 1867; interred Philadelphia, Pa. E.K.D. Sources: Hamilton Barrow Willis, St. Francisville, La.; House Journal; West Feliciana Parish Public Records." Bio from http://www.lahistory.org/site25.php -
"Hamilton, William Sutherland, 1789-1867?. Family Papers, 1766-1942 (bulk 1780-1884). 4 linear ft., 16 vols. Location: T:82-87, H:21, UU:148, OS:H. U.S. Army officer under General Wade Hampton, planter of Holly Grove Plantation, West Feliciana Parish, Louisiana, and politician who served on the first board of trustees for the College of Louisiana and a term in the Louisiana legislature. Papers reflect the administration of U.S. Army troops in the Territory of New Orleans and give an inclusive picture of national and Louisiana politics. Included are descriptions of Southern college facilities and curricula and early medical treatments. The papers also document conditions in the U.S. Army during the Mexican War, land speculation in Texas, and various aspects of plantation life and economy. " from the Louisiana State University Library Collections "Eliza C. STEWART b: ABT 1807 in Clarksville, Montgomery County, Tennessee, USA. Eliza married William Sutherland (Southerland) HAMILTON, who was a colonel in the U.S. Army. They lived in West Feliciana parish in Louisiana, where Hamilton was a successful planter and slave-owner. According to descendant L. Hamilton, the name of the plantation may have been "Holly Grove" or "Laurel Hill." Information posted at http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~rykbrown/stewart_of_ledcreich.htm
Listed on Death certificate as "Planter". Appears on 1860 United States Census as residing at the Pennsylvania Hospital for the Insane in Philadelphia, PA. Death notice, Philadelphia North American, December 27, 1862 - 
Burial: Laurel Hill Cemetery, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania, USA
Plot: Section L, Lot 415-428, Grave 36
http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=50101640

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Lieutenant Colonel Willoughby Morgan (VA) - postwar Rifle Regiment
Captain 12th infy 25 Apr. 1812: Major 12th infy 26 June 1813: retained, May 1815, Captain Rifle with bvt of Major: Major Rifle 8 Mar. 1817 : Lt. colonel 10 Nov. 1818 :in 6th infy May 1821 : transferred Oct 1821, to 5th infy : brevet Colonel ten years faithfull service 10 Nov 1828 : Colonel 1st infy 23 Apr 1830 : died 14 Apr 1832 at Ft Crawford.
Inspector general Colonel Arthur Perenneau Hayne described him as "active, vigilant & brave - a man of talents" - Report of Inspection of the Ninth Military Department, 1819 - L. B. S. The Mississippi Valley Historical Review, Vol. 7, No. 3 (Dec., 1920), pp. 261-274 - doi:10.2307/1891224 This article consists of 14 page(s).
http://books.google.com/books?id=iToOAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA266#v=onepage&q&f=false


An interesting footnote to the connection with the Revolutionary war Continental Ranger-Rifles   comes in the person of Morgan's illegitimate son, Willoughby Morgan, born about 1780-81 (while Morgan campaigned in the Carolinas),who served as an officer in the post War of 1812 Rifle Regiment. - see Donald Higginbotham's "Daniel Morgan - Revolutionary Rifleman" ("His birth so embarrassed Morgan that he never referred to Willoughby in his surviving letters or in his will...p. 183" and website CANTONMENT MISSOURI, 1819-1820 by Sally A. Johnson. 
Footnote for Lt. Col. Willoughby Morgan - "Morgan, Willoughby, Va. Capt. 12 Inf., 25 Apr, 1812. Maj. 26 June, 1813. Retained 17 May 1815 as Capt. Rifle Reg. with bvt of Maj. from 26 June 1813. Maj 8 Mar 1817. Lt. Col. 10 Nov. 1818. Trans. to 6 Inf. I June 1821. Trans. to 5 Inf. 1 Oct. 1821. Trans. to 3 Inf. 31 Jan. 1829. Col. 1 Inf. 23 Apr 1830. Bvt Col 10 Nov. 1828 for 10 yrs. fai serv. in one grade. Died Apr. 4, 1832." (Hamersley, op. cit., p. 648)." 

LIEUT COL WILLOUGHBY MORGAN, The history of Minnesota...: by Edward Duffield Neill, 1882, p. 898
http://books.google.com/books?id=Zj8VAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA898

"MORGAN VIEW (38): Natural view point on the edge of the tableland.
Lieutenant Willoughby Morgan served under Colonel Croghan in the Battle of Mackinac Island, Aug. 4, 1814, and rendered valuable service after the death of Major Holmes; with a piece of light artillery he caused the enemy to retire to a greater distance. After peace was concluded, as a result of the Treaty of Ghent, Colonel Butler took possession of the Fort and dependencies, then retired, leaving Captain Morgan of the U. S. Army in command of Mackinac."
Names of places of interest on Mackinac island, Michigan, by Michigan Historical Commission, Frank A. O'Brien, 1916
http://books.google.com/books?id=cefhAAAAMAAJ&pg=PA58

James's account of S.H. Long's expedition, 1819-1820, in Early Western Travels 1748 - 1846  by Edwin James, 1905, p.178
http://books.google.com/books?id=Wvc0AAAAIAAJ&pg=PA178

"From Lt. Col. W[illoughby] Morgan [to John Calhoun] St. Louis, Sept. 8th 1820

In a news paper printed at Lexington in the State of Kentucky much abuse is lavished upon the officers upon the Missouri on account of the severe punishments (the Editor says) they are in the habit of inflicting upon the soldiers under their command.

As I commanded upon the the Missouri for nearly eight months (from November to June last0 I conceive it to be my duty to give you some information on this subject with a view to obviate the erroneous impressions the above mentioned publication is calculated to produce.
There were two Corps under my immediate command-the sixth Regiment of Infantry and Rifle regiment.
In the first mentioned Regiment there is a standing order that no soldier shall be punished otherwise than by sentense [sic] of a Court Martial except in cases of mutinous conduct or insolense [sic] and disrespect toward their officers.  These offenses must meet with prompt punishment; otherwise there can be no discipline[,] no subordination and in fact no efficient military force in the United States.
  In the Rifle Regiment I gave orders and repeated them often that no soldier should be punished in a summary way without the approbation of the commandant of the Corps; and that this mode of punishment must be confined to incorrigible offenders whom it was impossible to manage or controul in any other way.  It was well understood in this Corps that no good soldier could be punished without the intervention of a Court-Martial except for mutinous conduct or insolent and dispespectfull behaviour toward his officers.  These offenses but seldom occur; but when they do occur they must meet with instant and exemplary punishment.
The officers were at the same time told that there must be nothing like cruelty in their punishments.
These were verbal [that is, oral] orders-but they were afterwards published to the Regiment in Regimental Orders.  I believe they are now in force in the Regiment.
Some officers were of the opinion that the law prohibiting corporeal [sic] punishment was repealed, and Courts-Martial have sentenced in pursuance of this opinion; but such sentences were always disapproved and consequently never carried into effect.
From this statement every one must be satisfied that punishments ["on the Missouri" interlined] were confined in as narrow limits as possible consistant [sic] with prese[r]vation of discipline and subordination.
With respect to Cropping that punishment has been inflicted by the sentense of a General Court-martial for desertion.  In two or three instances soldiers have suffered the same punishment without the intervention of a regular Court_martial for the same offense.  I do not give this information that it may be acted upon.  I wish from the heart this matter would sleep.  I shall be the last man to bring it to the public notice.  I mention this circumstance, because from my knowledge of it, I could not say any thing in reply to the abusive piece above alluded to.
I have justified myself.  I wish to injure no one.  I therefore desire that the portion of this letter relative to cropping may be considered as confidential-the other parts may be used as you shall judge proper.
Since General [Henry] Atkinson has been in command of the Department punishment by cropping has ceased.  It is a mode of punishment which cannot be reconciled to the feelings of the nation.
I am at this place upon indulgence.  I have been so long stationed in the wilderness that I find it necessary for the health both of soul and body to mingle a little in society.  I shall be at my post the moment my services are required."
pp. 350-35d
Papers, Volume 5; Volumes 1820-1821, by John Caldwell Calhoun, 1971

http://books.google.com/books?id=h0XF0jdmXTkC&printsec=frontcover&source=gbs_ge_summary_r&cad=0

"Presumably soldiers would also find target practice more attractive than marching about the parade ground, but evidently there was little of it.  Some commanders, however, emphasized it.  Willoughby Morgan of the Rifle Regiment built a range with firing points at 50 and 100 yards and established standards for markmen.  The best won the privilege of serving on the hunting detail..." p. 163
Fort Atkinson, pp. 168-169
"More than any of the efforts of the doctors and the post commander, Colonel Willoughby Morgan brought an end to the epidemic."
The old army: a portrait of the American Army in peacetime, 1784-1898, by Edward M. Coffman, 1986, p. 163, p. 187
http://bks6.books.google.com/books?id=2dreAAAAMAAJ&printsec=frontcover&img=1&zoom=1&sig=ACfU3U3r73Yej-JwYSOxk_1RB8A8ITLpyA

Willoughby Morgan as Lt Jefferson Davis' commander, see:
Peacekeeping on the Plains: Army operations in bleeding Kansas, by Tony R. Mullis, p.120
http://books.google.com/books?id=U5dEU7UWqloC&lpg=PP1&pg=PA120
The papers of Jefferson Davis, 1971, Volume 1 (p. 237) and Volume 5 (p. 220)
http://books.google.com/books?id=qqrJAB99FncC&lpg=PA220
The young Jefferson Davis, 1808-1846, by William A. Shelton, p. 66
http://books.google.com/books?id=8qsIEs1UKb4C&lpg=PP1&pg=PA66



"A PORTRAIT.
I want a name to give thy virtue, soldier,
For only good is far below thee.
Tragedy Of Valentinian
The army has lost a gallant commander, the country a worthy citizen, and religion a shining ornament. Colonel Willoughby MorGan died at Prairie du Chien, on the Upper Mississippi, about the last of March. He has not left his better behind him, nor will he be easily forgotten by any, who, like the writer of this notice, knew his rare worth. Colonel Morgan was the son of that brave officer of the revolution, familiarly known as " Rifle Morgan," or " Old Rifle." He inherited all his father's courage and more than his talents. There were few more thorough scholars in the United States than Willoughby Morgan. ...(continues thru page 456)"
The New-England magazine, Volume 2, J. T. and E. Buckingham, 1832, p. 453-456
http://books.google.com/books?id=Z5bNAAAAMAAJ&pg=PA453

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 

Lieutenant Colonel Josiah Snelling (MA) - 4th Rifle Regiment
First Lt 4th infy 3 May 1808: regimental Paymaster 6 Apr 1809: Captain June 1809: distinguished in battle of Tippecanoe Oct 1811 : brevet Major, for distinguished service in battle of Brownstown, 9 Aug 1812 (May 1810): Assistant inspector gen. (rank Major) 25 Apr 1813: Lieut colonel 4th Rifle. 21 Feb 1814 : Inspector general (rank Colonel) 12 Apr. 1814: distinguished in affair at Lyon's Creek under BGen Bissell : retained, May 1815, Lieut colonel 6th infy : Colonel 5th infy 1 June 1819 : died 20 Aug. 1828 at Washington city.

"born in Boston, Massachusetts, in 1782; died in Washington, D. C., 20 August, 1829. He joined a rifle company at the first call for troops for the war with Tecumseh, was appointed lieutenant in the 4th infantry in 1808, became a captain in June, 1809, served with credit at Tippecanoe, 7 November, 1811, and was brevetted major for services at Brownstown, 9 August, 1812. He became assistant inspector-general on 25 April, 1813, lieutenant-colonel of the 4th rifles on 21 February, 1814, inspector-general with the rank of colonel, 12 April, 1814, lieutenant-colonel of the 6th infantry in 1815, and colonel of the 5th infantry on 1 June, 1819. He participated in the battles of Lundy's Lane, Chippewa, and Fort Erie, and on his march to Detroit was captured by a force of British and Indians that was superior to his own. He escaped, with the loss of three or four men, to Fort Shelby, Detroit, where he became betrothed to Abigail, daughter of Colonel Thomas Hunt. On the night that had been appointed for his marriage he was sent by General William Hull with an inadequate detachment to check the landing of the British at Spring Well. On leaving the fort, he said to General Hull : "If I drive the Redcoats back, may I return and be married*." General Hull gave his consent, and the wedding took place on the same evening. At the surrender of Detroit he refused to raise the white flag. He was taken as a prisoner to Montreal, and while being marched through the streets was ordered by a British officer to take off his hat to Nelson's monument. This he refused to do in spite of the efforts of the soldiers to remove it, and finally General Isaac Brock ordered them to "respect the scruples of a braveman." He was appointed colonel of the 5th infantry on 1 June, 1819, was ordered to Council Bluffs, Maine, and thence to the confluence of the Mississippi and the Minnesota rivers. The location of the fort was removed to the present site of Fort Shelling, which he completed in 1824, after succeeding to the command. He gave it the name of Fort St. Anthony, which was changed by General Winfield Scott in honor of its builder and commander. Major Snelling always carried the sword of Charles Carroll of Carroll-ton, which had been presented to him. He was a witness against General William Hull at the latter's trial, and wrote "Remarks on General William Hull's Memoirs of the Campaign of the Northwestern, Army, 1812" (Detroit, 1825). - http://famousamericans.net/josiahsnelling/

"Josiah Snelling Jr
"First Lieutenant in Fonrth Infantry in 1808, regimental paymaster in April, 1909, and promoted to enptain In June the ame year. He was breveted a major for gallantry nt Brownstown, in August, 1S12. In April, 1813, was appointed assistant inspector general, with the rank of major, and in February,telt, was commissioned Lieutenant Colonel of the Fourth Regiment of Riflemen. In April he received the commission of inspector general, with the rank of colonel. He wns distinguished at Lyon's Creek, on the Chippewa, under General Bise11: and when the army was placed on a pence footing in 1814 be was retained as Lieutenant Colonel of the Sixth Infantry. He was promotod to Colonel of the Fifth in 1819. He died at Washington City on the 20th of August, 1828."
- The pictorial field-book of the war of 1812 by Benson John Lossing, 1868
http://books.google.com/books?id=okh7K53m_BIC&pg=PA203#v=onepage&q&f=false

FORT SNELLING MINNESOTA WHILE IN COMMAND OF COLONEL JOSIAH SNELLING FIFTH INFANTRY The National magazine: a monthly journal of American history, Volume 8, by William W. Williams, James Harrison Kennedy, 1888
http://books.google.com/books?id=b8DUAAAAMAAJ&printsec=frontcover&source=gbs_ge_summary_r&cad=0


--------------------------------------------MAJORS-----------------------------------------------------------------
Major Benjamin Birdsall (NY) - 4th Rifle Regiment
Capt 4th Rifle. 17 Маr 1814: brevet Major for distinguished service in defence of Ft Eric, Upper Canada 16 Aug. 1814 (Sept 1814): retained. May 1815, Rifle; died (killed by a soldier) 12 July, 1818, at Greenbush, N. Y.

"The battle now raged with increased fury on the right while on the left the enemy was repulsed at every point and put to flight Thence and from the centre Gaine6 promptly ordered re enforcements They were quickly sent by Ripley and Porter while Captain Fanning kept up a spirited cannonading on the enemy now to be seen approaching the fort for the day had dawned The enemy still held the bastion in spite of all efforts to dislodge them Hindman and Trimble had failed in their attempts to drive them out when Captain Birdsall of the Fourth Rifle Regiment rushed in through the gateway and with some infantry charged the foe They were repulsed and the captain was severely wounded Then a detachment from the Eleventh Nineteenth and Twenty second Infantry under Captain Foster of the Eleventh was introduced into the interior bastion for the purpose of charging the enemy..." p. 834
- The pictorial field-book of the war of 1812 by Benson John Lossing, 1868

NARA records show him mustering his company out at end or War of 1812..and two others sources state he was murdered in 1818.

Fredriksen's "Green Coats and Glory" page 70, relates the essentials of Birdsall's murder on 12 July, 1817 in Albany by "drunken soldier" Hamilton and subsequent hanging of the "Irishman" - a 19th century ethnic slur (notused by Fredriksen). I had recalled seeing Birdsall's name in conjunction with a former Riflemen's pension and land claims at: http://homepages.rootsweb.com/~ladd/bouland.htm

"Sketches of the life, and a narrative of the trial of James Hamilton who was tried and convicted, and sentenced to be hung ... for the murder of Major Benjamin Birdsall" - - by James Hamilton; Hooper Cumming, Publisher: Albany [N.Y. : s.n.], 1818. - http://worldcatlibraries.org/wcpa/ow/a86aa37891b9bef9a19afeb4da09e526.html
Subjects: Hamilton, James, -- 1791-1818 -- Trials, litigation, etc. | Birdsall, Benjamin, -- d. 1818.
Trials (Murder) -- New York (State) -- Albany. According brief entry descriptions for an August 1818 story in the Detroit Gazette and for October and November 1818 stories in the Cherry Valley Gazette (Otsego County), major Benjamin Birdsall died Sunday, July 14, 1818, having been shot by James Hamilton, "an Irishman." The major had been with the U.S. Rifle Corps and was survived by a wife and four children. Hamilton was convicted at a trial in Albany County Court of Oyer and Terminer in October and executed the next month. July 14, 1818 Birdsall, Major Benjamin died Sunday; shot by James Hamilton, an Irishman. He was of US rifle corps & leaves a wife & 4 children Detroit Gazette, August 7, 1818, Friday - http://www.geocities.com/histmich/detdeath.html
The Life and Dying Confessions of James Hamilton, Executed for the Murder of Major Benjamin Birdsall, Nov. 6, 1818, Albany-review by DE Graves
"in early 1818, he joins Major Benjamin's Birdsall's company of the Rifle Regiment stationed at Albany. Six months later, so drunk that he cannot even remember the act, he commits the crime which leads to his eventual execution. James Hamilton's story is a meandering but engrossing odyssey through the underworld of the early American republic. Hamilton seems to have been a literate and intelligent man and, although his story probably contains inevitable exaggeration, it does include enough detail in terms of dates, names, incidents and even the prices paid both for liquor and stolen goods to make it a creditable historical source."

Maj. Benjamin C. BIRDSALL, b. 1781 in Albany, NY; d. 1818 in Greenbush, NY; bur. Woodlawn Cemetery, Bronx, NY; son of Col. Benjamin BIRDSALL b. 4 Aug 1743 in Quaker Hill, Dutchess, NY, and Elizabeth AIKEN b. 19 Oct 1746 in Quaker Hill, Dutchess NY; m. ca 1795 of Greene, NY, Lydia BUSHNELL b. ca 1774
Children [6 listed]
http://awt.ancestrylibrary.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=dal-jdl8cc&id=I2847&ti=5542

"Soon after my [Thulow Weed’s] arrival in Albany two events occurred which attracted general interest. On the 4th of July [1818], the remains of General Montgomery, on their way from Quebec to New York, passed through the city. The procession, consisting of the military, civic societies, and citizens of Albany, Troy, and Schenectady, was imposing, impressive, and solemn. The Grand Marshal of the day was Major Benjamin Birdsall of the United States army, who had served gallantly in the war of 1812, and who appeared
on that day for the first time without the dressing upon a severe wound in the face that he received in the sortie at Fort Erie, in 1814.
On the 12th of the same month, as he was, on a Sunday afternoon, about to review his rifle battalion, he was shot by one of his soldiers. He had passed two hours of that afternoon in our office chatting with two or three friends. After he left the office, I went with a friend for a walk, and returning near sundown, between the patroon's and the old arsenal, I heard a rifle shot, and saw a commotion in the cantonment which lay between North Pearl Street and what is now known as the Little Basin. I ran to the spot, and assisted in removing the major (who was my intimate friend) on a litter to his residence in North Pearl Street, where he soon
expired.
The excitement against the soldier was so intense that it was difficult to prevent the populace from lynching him. He was committed to the jail, but the feeling ran so high that the civil authorities requested the officer in command at the Greenbush cantonment to receive and protect the prisoner.
Major Birdsall at the commencement of the war resided on a farm which he rented from the patroon, near the Shaker village. He went with a volunteer rifle company, of which he was an officer, to Plattsburgh, where, in the battle that ensued, his gallantry attracted the attention of General Macomb, on whose recommendation, along with that of Governor Tompkins, he was appointed an officer in the United States Rifle Corps, and served subsequently on the Niagara frontier, again distinguishing himself in several battles, until, at the close of the campaign of 1814, he received his desperate wound in leading, under General Peter B. Porter, the
assault upon Fort Erie. He had risen. against adverse circumstances, by intelligence and energy, to position and fame, and was justly appreciated by Albanians.
The prisoner, [Private James] Hamilton, was soon indicted, arraigned, tried, convicted, and sentenced to be hanged. The trial (which I reported for the " Register") was in the Assembly Chamber, and although Hamilton himself always admitted the charge, and manifested no solicitude for the result of the trial, somebody (his father, it was supposed) employed counsel for him, who strenuously urged an acquittal on the ground of temporary insanity occasioned by liquor, but of course producing no effect.
After his conviction, at the request of Sheriff Hempsted, I went to Hamilton's cell, with a strong feeling of repugnance, which, however, after two or three visits, was, by a revelation of all the circumstances, changed to a sorrowful sympathy. Hamilton was the natural son of a man engaged successfully in a business that ultimately made him wealthy in the city of New York. His mother, turned adrift in disgrace and destitution, struggled as well as she could for a few years, and then left him to the world's charity.
At the commencement of the war of 1812, then about twenty years old, he enlisted, and it was shown on his trial that he served faithfully and gallantly, receiving at the close of the war an honorable discharge. He had known and greatly admired Major Birdsall during the war. After a year or two of irregularities, with uncertain and precarious employment, he sought Major Birdsall's recruiting rendezvous and reenlisted. For more than a week before the fatal rifle was fired Hamilton had been intoxicated. On Saturday, a light-colored mulatto, a fine, soldierly-looking young man, who had served during the war, 1817.] A SOLDIER'S EXECUTION. 65
also reenlisted, and was sent to camp to be mustered in; after which, the major intended to take him to his house as a waiter. At mid-day on Sunday Hamilton was told that a negro had been recruited, and as he was, like Hamilton, a tall fellow, was to be put into his platoon and mess. This, maddened as he already was with a mixture of bad whiskey and sour cider, exasperated him beyond control. He loaded his rifle, and went prowling about in search of the " negro," who, informed of Hamilton's threats, kept out of his way, — until at six o'clock Hamilton, with rifle in hand, saw him dodge behind a tent, and started after him. At this moment the major, who was approaching, called, "Hamilton, take your place!" and the rifle, which was ready to be discharged at the soldier, was instantaneously aimed and fatally discharged at the major. In his sober senses, he would have defended Major Birdsall at the risk of his own life.
As a coincidence entitled to be remembered, it is proper to say that Major Birdsall, like the man who assassinated him, was an illegitimate child, unacknowledged until after he had distinguished himself in the war. His father, Colonel Benjamin Birdsall, an officer in the revolutionary army, and an influential citizen of Columbia County, then sent for the major and acknowledged him as a son.
After Hamilton was convicted and sentenced to execution [Nov 1818], he requested me to write his "Life and Confession." He told me that he was the natural son of a wealthy New Yorker, from whom he had received nothing, and whom he never saw; but although he owed him neither affection nor duty, he did not want his father's name made public. The day before his execution he asked permission of the sheriff to walk to the gallows instead of riding, as was usual, on a cart with his coffin. His request was granted. He then asked me to walk near him and witness his execution, that I might see and say that he died like a soldier. It was more than a mile from the jail to the place of execution. The sheriff's posse was escorted by a military company. I walked with the sheriff directly behind Hamilton, whose bearing was that of a soldier, proud of the attention he attracted. He ascended to the scaffold with a firm step, talked cheerfully with the clergyman for a few minutes, said goodbye to the multitude, and told the sheriff he was ready. At the fatal moment, when the drop fell, the rope parted, and, to the horror of all present, Hamilton lay stretched upon the ground. But instantly springing to his feet, he stood erect until the sheriff approached him and said, "This is hard, Hamilton." "Yes," he replied, "but it is my own fault; I asked you for too much slack." The sheriff then took a cart-rope, and, handing it to Hamilton, inquired, "Do you think this strong enough?" Hamilton replied, with a smile, "It is large enough to be strong." It was then adjusted to his neck, when he re-ascended, and placed himself upon the drop with a firm foot. Again the fatal cord was cut, and in a few seconds all was over. That was the first and last execution I ever attended."
"Shooting of Major Birdsall," Life of Thurlow Weed including his autobiography and a memoir, by Thurlow Weed, Houghton Mifflin and company, 1883, pp. 63-66
http://books.google.com/books?id=KRkOAAAAIAAJ&pg=PA63#v=onepage&q&f=false

[last entry found in pdf entitled "Craft Masonry in Columbia County, New York," Compiled by R..W...Gary L. Heinmiller, Director, Onondaga & Oswego Masonic Districts Historical Societies (OMDHS)www.omdhs.syracusemasons.com,July 2010...http://www.omdhs.syracusemasons.com/sites/default/files/history/Craft%20Masonry%20in%20Columbia%20County.pdf] - which also contains my above listed information
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 

Major John G. Blount (NC) - 3rd Rifle Regiment - 1st Rifle Regiment
Captain 18th infy 27 May 1812 : Aide de Сamp to MGen Hampton 1813 : transferred 1814 to 3rd Rifle: Major 1st Rifle 12 Aug 1814: resigned 15 May 1815

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 

Major William Bradford (KY) - postwar Rifle Regiment
Capt 17th infy 12 Mar. 1812: wounded in siege of Ft Meigs, and distinguished in its sortie 5 May '13: distinguished in commanding Arty in battle of the Horse Shoe, under MGen. Jackson 27 Mar. 1814: Major 21st infy 20 Aug. 1814: retained, May 1815, Captain Rifle, with brevet of Major: in 7th infy May 1821: Major 4th infy 6 Oct 1822: resigned 1 May 1824.—Brig. Gen. of the U. S. Territory of Ark 24 May 1824.
JSTOR: Fort Smith: Little Gibraltar on the Arkansas by Edwin C. Bearss, A. M. Gibson
"Founded in 1817, near the head of navigation on the Arkansas River,...Fort Smith was founded by Major William Bradford and a company of the Rifle Regiment"
-http://links.jstor.org/sici?sici=0030-8684(197011)39%3A4%3C534%3AFSLGOT%3E2.0.CO%3B2-H

"On Christmas Day 1817, Major William Bradford arrived at Belle Point at the confluence of the Poteau and Arkansas Rivers and established Fort Smith. With only 100 men, this fort was intended to maintain peace between the tribes. The Osage and Cherokee met in St. Louis in 1818 and again made a truce but retaliatory raids continued. Another truce was signed at Fort Smith in 1819 where, at the insistance of Maj. Bradford, the Cherokee returned most of their Osage prisoners." - http://cherokeehistory.com/arkansas.html

In 1819, Inspector general Colonel Arthur Perenneau Hayne described him as "Brave, enthusiastic & devoted to his profession" - Report of Inspection of the Ninth Military Department, 1819 - L. B. S. The Mississippi Valley Historical Review, Vol. 7, No. 3 (Dec., 1920), pp. 261-274 - http://books.google.com/books?id=iToOAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA266#v=onepage&q&f=false

"In February (1822), a United States Army regiment commanded by Colonel Matthew Arbuckle arrived at Fort Smith to replace Major William Bradford and his chronically short-handed company. Bradford and his soldiers had held the thankless job of peacemaker in this, the furthest frontier of the United States, since 1817." - http://www.arkansashistory.com/resources/timeline/1822.asp
"Fort Smith Ark: "The first recorded burial was that of surgeon Thomas Russell. He was a War of 1812 veteran who was with the original company of riflemen who landed on December 25, 1817, at Fort Smith (Sebastian County). He died there on August 24, 1819. The cemetery originally served as the post cemetery for the first Fort Smith. While the first recorded burial took place in 1819, by 1823, roughly twenty-five percent of the men at Fort Smith had died. This was one reason for the military’s abandonment of the original post in 1825. Even after the military’s abandonment of the fort, the cemetery was still used. Major William Bradford, the first commanding officer of Fort Smith, died on October 20, 1826, and was buried in the old post cemetery." - http://encyclopediaofarkansas.net/encyclopedia/entry-detail.aspx?entryID=2943

"Arkansas Gazette - 11/14/1826 - DIED - At his residence at Cantonment Towson, after a long and painful illness, on the 29th ult. William Bradford, Brigadier General of the Militia of the Territory of Arkansas, and Suttler to the above post, aged about 55 years. Gen. Bradford was for many years a Captain in the U.S. Army, and distinguished himself during the late war, and in the Indian Wars in the South, under Gen. Jackson, as a brave and intrepid officer; and on one occasion, received a severe wound in the body, which has proved a painful and serious inconvenience to him during the subsequent part of his life. He was for several years Commanding Officer at Fort Smith, where he remained until the garrison of that post was increased by the force under Col. Arbuckle, when he was appointed to the rank of Major by brevet, shortly after which he resigned his commission in the Army, with the intention of returning to the walks of private life. Few men have been more actively or more usefully employed during their lives, and few have died more universally regretted by a large circle of acquaintances, than Gen. Bradford." -http://www.arkansasties.com/Gazette/1826/1826November.htm
"Summoned for jury duty in U.S. v. McCraney but due to delay in trial, was dismissed, see United States v. McCraney (1822); deceased husband of Frances Bradford who, as executrix of William will, was sued by William Stagner in debt, Stagner alleging that William Bradford had failed to pay a promissory note executed in Stagner's favor in 1810, see Stagner v. Bradford (1827); deceased; his wife, Frances, was his executrix and was sued by Joseph Garres in debt, see Garres v. Bradford (1827); Bradford was also the plaintiff in a celebrated lawsuit which involved the forced enlistment of a soldier of the name of Riley who served from 1817 to 1821 at Fort Smith. The soldier was represented by Sevier, Crittenden and Ashley, while Bradford had William Trimble, William Quarles, and Robert C. Oden as his attorneys. The soldier Riley was awarded $1450 by the jury (Shinn, p. 87). Bradford died in 1826 from yellow fever and of a gun shot wound received the previous year which disabled him (13 AHQ, p. 348)."- http://arcourts.ualr.edu/Personal-Names/names-b.htm

"Advised to select experienced and skillful men to carry out this mission, Jackson chose the Rifle Regiment, a crack infantry unit skilled in scouting and....Members of Rifle Regiments from Baton Rouge and Natchitoches joined Major William Bradford's company"p.319 
Fort Smith, Little Gibraltar on the Arkansas, by Edwin C. Bearss and Arrell M. Gibson, Norman: University of Oklahoma Press; 1979
The Louisiana Purchase: a historical and geographical encyclopedia, Junius P. Rodriguez - 2002 - Page 319

http://books.google.com/books?id=Qs7GAwwdzyQC&printsec=frontcover

February 5th 1822 Belle Point, William Bradford's rifle company - As Edwin Bearss wrote, "...the last company of the proud Rifle Regiment was no more." p. 111
Edwin C. Bearss and A.M. Gibson, Fort Smith: Little Gibraltar on the Arkansas (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1969)
A Stranger and a Sojourner: Peter Caulder, Free Black Frontiersman in Antebellum Arkansas by Billy D. Higgins, 2005 
"The extraordinary story of a pioneering African-American community leader is now told. After serving in the War of 1812 (A rifleman-pioneer in the Third Rifle Regiment and post-war Rifle Regiment), Peter Caulder, a free African-American settler in the Arkansas territory, has his life turned upside down on the eve of the Civil War." 


----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Major James Fuller (VT) - original US Regiment of Riflemen
Like Smyth and Duane a political appointee but with Revolutionary military service as a Captain - including service at Yorktown where he claimed he ""rec'd the hand and thanks of the Commander in Chief that I commanded the best company in his army." Fredriksen, p. 18
Served with Rifle Regiment from 1808-1812, primarily in New Orleans Mississippi Territory, where disease and mismanagement of Gen James Wilkinson took its toll on the Army. "The Regiment of Riflemen had no sooner been raised than it commenced field operations in the deep South. Two companies joined the army of General James Wilkinson at New Orleans, where they suffered under his gross mismanagement." Fredriksen, p.19
Foul ups continued under Wade Hampton, who was promoted to brigadier general in 1809 and replaced James Wilkinson as the general in charge of New Orleans.
Fuller was ordered to lead a Rifle detachment on a debilitating 600 mile march from Cantonment Washington to Fort Hampton four miles from the mouth of the Elk River - the Elk River expedition beginning in June 1810. It took 46 days to complete the movement through the "inhospitable wilderness."  At age 54 when commissioned, Fuller, too "old and worn out," resigned in August 1812. Fredriksen, p. 20
American State Papers -  Report of a committee on the mortality of the troops stationed for the defence of New Orleans, April 27, 1810, ... 268
Trial of Col. Thomas H. Cushing Before a General Court Martial [1811-1812]..., Thomas Humphrey Cushing, Wade Hampton, Published by Moses Thomas, J. Maxwell, Printer, 1812 [Colonel Alexander Smyth, Commanding at Baton Rouge. was original President of the Board]
http://books.google.com/books?id=9UgDAAAAYAAJ&printsec=frontcover&source=gbs_ge_summary_r&cad=0
John Fuller (1756-1839). John Fuller's record of  service. Transcripts, John Fuller papers, Ohio Historical Society.
"In March, 1809, Chief George Colbert of the Chickasaw nation intimated that if these white intruders were not removed, he would himself evict them.  In response, the Cherokee Agent, Colonel Return J. Meigs, was ordered to force these settlers to leave. On June 12, 1809, Meigs reported that his soldiers had marched over 400 miles in a campaign that took 51 days to evict 201 families from the Chickasaw lands.
A number of these people returned along with others who were eager to carve out a home in the wilderness.  This brought about so much pressure from the Chickasaw people that General Wade Hampton was ordered to establish a fort near the Shoals.  Fort Hampton was built about 1810 approximately four miles from the mouth of Elk River.  this was more of a garrison than a fort in that its mission was to keep the settlers out and not to fight the Indians.  A Captain Smythe [Rifle Regiment] ] was its first commanding officer.  He was later replaced by Captain George Washington Sevier [Rifle Regiment] , son of tennessee's first governor, John Sevier.  The August 24, 1810, edition of the Democratic Clarion and Tennessee Gazette, Nashville, Tennessee, reported this news item: "By a gentleman from Muscle Shoals we have learned that Captain James McDonald's and Captain John Regan's[Ragan] companies [both Rifle Regiment]  had arrived at the Rifle Company[?] a few miles from the mouth of Elk River, from the cantonment [Cantonment Washington] near Natchez. They were at present from the command of Major John Fuller[Rifle Regiment]; but Coloenel Purdy from Hiwassee was expected there in a few days...The object for assembling soldiers is conjectured to be twofold: first to remove intruders on the Indian lands, and secondly to open a road to the Tombigbee...To effect the first object, Lieutenant Thomas Ramsey[Rifle Regiment]  has left notices at several public places among the settlers requiring them to move off the land by the 15th of December next, otherwise the military were ordered to drive them off at the point of the bayonet..." p.220
A Walk Through the Past - People and Places of Florence and Lauderdale, by William Lindsey McDonald, 1997, Heart of Dixie Publishing, 2003, p. 220
http://books.google.com/books?id=HXPa7_F5c1cC&lpg=PA220
Mississippi Territory in the War of 1812, Volume 4  By Eron Opha Rowland, 1921, reprinted form Mississippi Historical  Society Centenary, Series Volume IV, map on p.16
http://books.google.com/books?id=_ntSrQAFBI0C&printsec=frontcover
Memoirs of my own times,Vol II, by James Wilkinson,printed by Abraham Small., 1816
http://books.google.com/books?id=_U4FAAAAYAAJ&printsec=frontcover

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Major David Gwynne (OH) - 2nd Rifle Regiment
First Lt 19th infy 12 Mar 1812: regimental Paymaster 1 Oct 1812: distinguished under Colonel B. Campbell against Mississinewa Indians 17 and 18 Dec 1812 ; and greatly distinguished in defence of Ft Meigs 5 May 1813 : Captain Mar 1813 : Brigade major to BGen McArthur Aug 1813: Major 2nd Rifle 21 Feb 1814: disbanded June 1815 - Paymaster 7th Bn Arty 29 Apr 1816: resigned May 1830. died near Louisville Ken in 1849

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Major Lodowick Morgan (MD)- original US Regiment of Riflemen - 1st Rifle Regiment
Second Lt Rifle. 3 May 1808 : First Lt May 1809 : Capt July 1811 : Major 1st Rifle. 24 Jan. 1814: commended in brilliant affair at Scajocada creek, near Black Rock, repulsing a superior force of the enemy 3 Aug 1814: killed 12 Aug 1814, in a skirmish before the works at Ft Erie.
*Conjocta (Conjocheta) Creek. Historic Name, Conjocta Creek. Secondary Names, Scajaquada Creek, Black Rock, Shoguoquady Creek, Conkuichity
"Extracts of letters from brigadier general Gaines to the secretary of war dated Head quarters Fort Eric U Canada August 7 1814"... "REPORT OT MAJ MORGAN Fort Erie August 5th, 1814...If sir, you believe we have done our duty, we shall feel highly gratified. I am sir respectfully your obedient servant L MORGAN Major 1st rifle regiment"...From the Buffalo Gazette, August 16 SPLENDID DEFENCE OF FORT ERIE - "On Friday major Morgan with a detachment from his rifle corps attacked the enemy in the skirts of the woods back of the fort; and after a brisk musquetry of some time returned to the fort, with the loss of ten or twelve killed, among whom, we regret to say, was that excellent officer major Lodowick Morgan, of the 1st rifle regiment, who so gallantly repulsed the enemy at Conjockety Creek, the morning of the 3d instant, he was interred at Buffalo on Saturday with all the honors due to his rank and distinguished bravery."  pp. 436-438
Niles' Weekly register, FROM MARCH TO SEPTEMBER 1814 VOL VI
http://books.google.com/books?id=fvEaAAAAYAAJ&printsec=frontcover 
"Lodowick Morgan was a native of Maryland and entered the army as second lieutenant in a rifle corps in May 19 1806, was promoted to captain in July 1811, and to major in January 1814. He was a very efficient officer and received highest praise for his conduct in repelling the British invasion near Black Rock on the 3d of August 1814, already in the text. He was killed as we have seen in a skirmish before Fort Erie on the 12th of the same month. "
- The pictorial field-book of the war of 1812 by Benson John Lossing, 1868
"...Being opposed by the riflemen above mentioned, under Major Lodowick Morgan, there ensued a fight of some importance, known as the "Battle of Conjockety Creek." Strangely enough there was no account of it in the Buffalo Gazette, though it afterwards alluded to Major Morgan as the "hero of Conjockety...."p. 169
History of the city of Buffalo and Erie county:, by Henry Perry Smith, 1884
http://books.google.com/books?id=UoIrZesWxNIC&printsec=frontcover
"...General Brown, the American commander at the time of the campaign of 1814, had accumulated large quantities of military supplies, ammunition, guns, etc., at both Black Rock and Buffalo, designed for the army in Canada. Upon retiring from the vicinity of Lundy's Lane battlefield, our forces were back in Fort Erie on the first of August, 1814. Buffalo and Black Rock were garrisoned by the first battalion of the First United States Rifles and some militia and a few Indians, numbering about three hundred and fifty men all told, commanrled by Major Lodowick Morgan of the First United States Rifles. On the night of August 2nd, General Drummond, the British commander, detailed a force of fifteen hundred men under command of Lieutenant Colonel John G. P. Tucker, for the destruction of the military stores at Buffalo and Black Rock and the dispersion of the troops there stationed, his object being to prevent any succor to the besieged troops in. Fort Erie. This force landed near the foot of Squaw Island and came up through the woods to the bridge at Scajaquada Creek. Upon hearing of the landing, Major Morgan, moved his small but efficient force to the south side of the Scajaquada, and threw up some log breastworks. The bridge in question was of the jack knife order, highest in the center an-1 raising^ so as to permit the passage of boats through to the river. In addition to the breastworks, Major Morgan tore up the planking on the south half of the bridge, and owing to its peculiar construction this could not be seen from the other half. The British troops reached the bridge at about four o'clock in the morning of August 3rd and attempted to cross. Notwithstanding the sharp fire from the Americans they reached the center of the bridge and were halted at the open trap before them. They endeavored with great pluck to restore the planking but were unable to do so. They also endeavored to cross the creek further up but were driven back in that movement. At length, after two and one-half hours of fighting, they returned to their boats and across the river to the British camp. Colonel Tucker acknowledged in his report a loss of twelve killed, seventeen wounded and five missing, but it is supposed to have been much larger. The American loss was slight as the Brftish fire was too high and the bullets went mainly into the trees causing a shower of leaves to fall like rain...."pp. 274-275
Annals of the Early Settlers Association of Cuyahoga County, Volume 5, by Early Settlers Association of Cuyahoga County, 1904
http://books.google.com/books?id=fz0VAAAAYAAJ&printsec=frontcover
"Other action during the summer of 1814 included about 300 American sharpshooters under Major Lodowick Morgan,behind earthworks at..."p. 941
Ground warfare: an international encyclopedia, 2002

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Major Walter H. Overton (TN) - 3rd Rifle Regiment
First Lt 7th infy 8 May 1808: Captain Dec. 1810: Military agent, Natchitoches 1812: Major 3rd Rifle 21 Feb 1814: brevet Lt colonel for gallantry conduct in battle of N. Orleans, 23 Dec. 1814 (July 16): commanded Ft St. Philip in repelling 9 days bombardment of British fleet, from 9 to 17 Jan 1816 : retained May 1815, in Arty : resigned 31 Oct 1815. Representative in Cong, from Louisiana 1829 to 1831
A dictionary of all officers: who have been commissioned, or have been, by Charles Kitchell Gardner, 1853,  p. 572

"While the armies were burying their dead on the field of strife, a portion of the British were seeking to secure the free navigation of the Mississippi below New Orleans for themselves by capturing Fort St Philip, at a bend of the stream seventy or eighty miles below the city in a direct line, and which was considered by both parties as the key of Louisiana. It contained at that time a garrison of three hundred and sixty six men under Major Overton,1 of the Rifle corps, and the crew of a gunboat which had been warped into the bayou at its side. On the morning of the 9th...FN-1 Walter H Overton of Tennessee entered the army in 1808 and was commissioned a major in February 1814 his gallantry In defending Fort St Philip he was breveted lieutenant colonel He resigned in 1815 He was a of Congress from Louisiana from 1829 to 1831 "p. 1050
- The pictorial field-book of the war of 1812 by Benson John Lossing, 1868

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Major William H Puthuff (OH) - 2nd Rifle Regiment
Adjutant of McArthur's regiment Ohio Volunteers 7 May 1812; Captain 26th infy 20 May 1813 : Major 2nd Rifle 21 Feb 1814 : disbanded 15 June 1815. Member Legislative council of Michigan territory, Jan 1824 and died Nov 1824

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Major Thomas J Robeson - vice Robinson - (NC) - 3rd Rifle Regiment - 4th Rifle Regiment
Capt 18th infy 12 Mar 1812: transferred 1814, to 3rd Rifle : Major 4th Rifle 17 Sept 1814 : disbanded 15 June 1816

----------------------------------------------CAPTAINS------------------------------------------------------

Captain William Armstrong (OH) - 1st Rifle Regiment - postwar Rifle Regiment
Ensign rifle. 19 Jan. 1813 : Third Lt Mar 1813: Second Lt 1st Rifle Jan. 1814: distingusihed under Maj. Appling at Stony Creek ; and distinguished under Maj. L. Morgan at Scajoeada (*CONJOCTA)Creek: First Lt Oct. 1816 : Captain July 1818: retained May '21, in 6th infy: died 11 Feb. 1827.
Inspector general Colonel Arthur Perenneau Hayne described him as "Indolent, tho' capable of making a good Officer" - Report of Inspection of the Ninth Military Department, 1819 - L. B. S. The Mississippi Valley Historical Review, Vol. 7, No. 3 (Dec., 1920), pp. 261-274 - doi:10.2307/1891224
http://books.google.com/books?id=iToOAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA266#v=onepage&q&f=false

"Accordingly, on the 22d of June six Companies of the 6th Regt. left this post with three keel boats laden with subsistence for the troops, ammunition, and two six pound cannon. The Companies were Bt. Major Ketchum's commanded by Lt. J. Bradly.—-Captains Armstrong and Riley with their respective  Light Companies.—-Bt. Major Larabee's Company commanded by Lieut. N. J. Crugar, who also did the duties of Asst. Commy.  of Subsistence and Qr. Master.—-Capt. Gantts' Company commanded by Lt. Wickliff and Company F, commanded by Lt. Morris, who was also in charge of the Ordnance and Ordnance Stores for the expedition.-—Lieut. Thomas Noel, Adjutant.—-
Doctor J. Gale, Surgeon.
 To the first boat was assigned the two companies commanded by Capt. Armstrong and Lt. Crugar. To the second the two companies commanded by Capt. Riley and Lieut. Bradly.
To the third boat the two companies commanded by Lieuts. Wickliff and Morris....
Capt. Riley and GenL Ashley were accordingly ordered to advance with all possible expedition.
 Although they had been marching very rapidly for several miles they set out upon a run. It appeared however from the anxiety of Mr. Pilcher that the Sioux were hard pressed and I sent my adjutant (Lt. Noel) to order Capt. Armstrong to advance also with his Light Company. But all the troops being
actuated by the same generous ardour there was but little difference in the time of their arrival. Major Ketchum arrived, very soon after Capt. Armstrong with the remainder of the battalion.
 We formed our line as follows: Genl. Ashley with his two Companies on the right, and his right resting upon the Missouri river. Next the five Companies of the 6th Rt. commanded by Bt.
Major Ketchum with Capt. Armstrong's Light Company on the right and Capt. Riley's Company acting as Riflemen on the left.
The line was formed very soon and the men ordered to support arms and advance. They did so. The Sioux were in our front as well as the Aricaras. We therefore could not deliver our fire untill we had passed the Sioux. But as soon as the Indians saw [page 216] our line advancing the Aricaras broke from their hiding places. The Sioux fired upon them....."
OFFICIAL CORRESPONDENCE OF THE LEAVENWORTH EXPEDITION INTO SOUTH DAKOTA IN 1823 WITH EDITORIAL NOTES BY DOANE ROBINSON
http://e.library.sd.gov/SodakLIVE-Docs/history/SDHistoricalCollections/Vol1-1902/07-OfficialCorrespLeavenworth.txt

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Captain James H. Ballard (MD) - 4th Rifle Regiment - postwar Rifle Regiment
noted as Ballard, James H. in TA Smith Papers-http://whmc.umsystem.edu/invent/1029.html
(Md) Sec Lt 36. infy 30 Apr. 1813: Adjutant 1813: First Lt 4th Rifles Mar 1814: Adjutant 1814: retained, May 1815, Captain Apr 1817: died 15 Jan. 1823.
Summary of report from Capt James H. Ballard  3 February 1821, concerning the cultivation of crops and the raising of livestock at Fort Smith, Arkansas Territory. p. 594
Papers, Volume 5; Volumes 1820-1821, by John Caldwell Calhoun, 1971
http://books.google.com/books?id=h0XF0jdmXTkC&printsec=frontcover

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Captain Thomas Biddle Jr (PA) - postwar Rifle Regiment
Captain Infy 9 Apr 1812: in 2nd arty 6 July 1812: Brigade major in 1812: distinguished in capture of Ft George, and at Stony Creek May and June 1813: Brigade major to Brig. Gen. Williams Sept 1813: wounded in battle of Niagara Falls 25 July 1814: brevet Major for distinguished service in defence of Ft Erie Upper Canada 15 Aug 1814 (Sept 1814) in which he was wounded: Aide de Camp to MGen Izard Dec. 1814 : retained, May 1815, in Arty: transferred May 1820, to Rifle : Paymaster Rifle 7 Aug 1820: killed in duel 29 Aug 1831 at St. Louis Missouri
"..born in Philadelphia, Pa., Nov. 21, 1790. At the outbreak of the war of 1812 he joined the army with the rank of captain of artillery, and was conspicuous at Fort George, Stony Creek, and at the reduction of Fort Erie, where he commanded the artillery and received a severe wound. After bravely fighting in the desperate battle of Lundy's Lane, July 25, 1814, and receiving a painful wound, he brought from the field as a trophy a field-piece which he captured from the enemy. In 1814 he was given the brevet rank of major for his gallantry, and later in the same year was appointed to the staff of General Izard as aide..." - www.pennock.ws/surnames/nti/nti65276.html
"Captain (Brevet Major) Thomas Biddle, of the Rifle regiment, also a handy journalist-historian military attache of the expedition, at the request of Colonel Henry Atkinson, its commander, reported to that officer,3 from "Camp Missouri", October 29, 1819, results of his personal observations among the Osage, Kansas, Oto and Missouri, Iowa, Pawnee, and Omaha tribes of Indians and some account of the trade between whites and Indians." - FIRST STEAMBOAT TRIAL TRIP UP THE MISSOURI By ALBERT WATKINS - Collections of the NSHS - Volume 17 - www.rootsweb.com/~neresour/OLLibrary/collections/vol17/v17p162.htm
- "From "Bloody Island" duels (wiki) - Thomas Biddle and Spencer Darwin Pettis dueled on August 26, 1831. "Bloody Island was a sand bar in the Mississippi River, opposite St. Louis, Missouri, which became densely wooded and a rendezvous for duelists because it was considered "neutral" and not under Missouri or Illinois control...Biddle challenged Pettis because of Pettis complaints against Biddle's brother Nicholas Biddle who was president of the United States Bank. They fired at five feet and both were killed..."
"At 5:00 p.m. on Friday, August 26, 1831, Major Thomas Biddle, a distinguished War of 1812 veteran and Congressman Spencer Pettis, a promising politician, faced each other pistols in hand. They met on Bloody Island to answer a perceived insult to Thomas’ brother, Nicholas Biddle. The disagreement began when Thomas Biddle took exception to Pettis’ remarks attacking the United States Bank of which Nicholas was the president. Initially, Biddle and Pettis merely exchanged inflammatory letters in the newspaper. However, resenting the allegations and regarding this as a personal attack against his brother’s character, Biddle went to the ill Pettis’ hotel room and proceeded to cowhide his opponent. When Pettis regained his health he challenged Thomas Biddle. As the challenged, the near-sighted Biddle chose the specified distance of five feet. The pistols were so close that both men received fatal wounds. Spencer Pettis died the next day and Major Thomas Biddle died on Monday. Both men were buried with honors and eulogized as choosing “death to avoid dishonor.” Pettis County Missouri is named for Spencer Pettis." - http://www.sos.mo.gov/archives/education/dueling/political-duels.asp
Biddle Thomas 1790-1831 & Biddle, Ann Mullanphy (1800-1846)
Thomas Biddle of Philadelphia, who became paymaster of the United States Army and a director of the St. Louis branch of the Bank of the United States
Ann, his wife.."a puzzling mixture of personality traits: charitable and tightfisted, sociable and lonely, delightful to her distinguished guests but shrewish and litigioua toward he help." bio describes how John O'Fallon assisted a "brother Rifle officer's" widow.-Dictionary of Missouri Biography By Lawrence O. Christensen, 1999, p.65-66
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Captain Walter Coles (VA) - 3rd Rifle Regiment
Second Lt 2nd Light dragoons 12 Mar 1812: Capt 3rd Rifle Mar 1814: disbanded June 1815. [Representative in Congress from Vir 1835 to 1843]
Representative from Virginia; born at Coles Ferry, Halifax County, Va., December 8, 1790; moved with his parents to Pittsylvania County, Va., in 1798; attended Hampden-Sidney College, Prince Edward County, Va., and Washington College (now Washington and Lee University), Lexington, Va.; served as a second lieutenant in the Second Regiment of Light Dragoons in the War of 1812; promoted to the rank of captain of riflemen (on the northern frontier; was honorably discharged in 1815 and returned to Virginia, where he engaged in agricultural pursuits; justice of the peace; member of the State house of delegates 1817, 1818, 1833, and 1834; elected as a Jacksonian to the Twenty-fourth Congress and reelected as a Democrat to the four succeeding Congresses (March 4, 1835-March 3, 1845); was not a candidate for renomination in 1844; resumed agricultural pursuits; died at his home, “Coles Hill,” near Chatham, Va., on November 9, 1857; interment in the family burying ground at “Coles Hill.” - http://bioguide.congress.gov/scripts/biodisplay.pl?index=C000625

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Captain John Ewing Calhoun Jr. (SC) - 3rd Rifle Regiment - postwar Rifle Regiment
aka J E Calhoun - Capt 3rd rifle. 17 Mar 1814: resigned 11 Mar 1815
cousin and brother-in-law of Vice President (1824-32) John C. Calhoun (Secretary of War 1817-1824 - when in 1821 when Rifles disbanded) - his commission certifiate is in John Caldwell Calhoun Papers donated to Clemson University Libraries - inherited his father's John Ewing Colhoun's plantation - Keowee Heights was built by John Ewing Colhoun originally as a summer home in the 1790's. The site of the plantation was on a high hill between the Keowee and Twelve Mile Rivers...later "Colonel" John E. Colhoun and a member of the SC legislature - http://ftp.rootsweb.com/pub/usgenweb/sc/pickens/cemeteries/p228.txt
Commission mentioned in Register at Clemson - http://www.lib.clemson.edu/SpCol/findingaids/Mss/Mss0200r.pdf
Colhoun, John Ewing, 1791-1847. John Ewing Colhoun (1791-1847) papers - University of South Carolina "Letter from John C Calhoun to Captain John Ewing Calhoun*, Washington 26th Feb 1815
Dear John, I regret that your departure from this place was so sudden as not to give me an opportunity of seeing you; and tho', it has afforded me extreme delight that the just and necessary war which we have been compeled to wage with England has been brought to a termination so advantageous and glorious to our country, yet I would have been much pleased if you could have had an opportunity of acquiring that honor which I am confident you would, had the war taken another campaign. The most active means had been put in operation to reduce the Canadas the next summer, and I believe, with such officers and soldiers as we have they would have succeeded. As to your future course; my advice would be not to continue in the army during peace, but I would not resign. The probability is that the military establishment will be much reduced; and it is proposed to give every captain who will thrown out by such reduction 640 acres of land and three months pay. If you should resign, you would loose this compensation, which the country thinks fit to give to those who have served her. You had better write to the Secretary at War that you had entered the service of the country, with an intention to render what service you could during the war, and that it was not your desire to continue in during peace, and that you would desire to be ranked among those officers, who would be put out of service by the reduction of the army...."p. 127
NB-son of Calhoun's first cousin Senator John E. Calhoun, and brother of Mrs. Calhoun. He was now a captaln in the U. S. Army.
"To Jacob Brown. Department of War, 5 Sep., 1819
Sir, The views which you express in relation to the intercourse between the Indians residing within our limits and the British Posts in Upper Canada concur entirely with my own. It ought and must be stopped.......Since my circular the Quarter Master's disbursements have evidently diminished, and, I hope, with the zealous cooperation of the officers of the Army, to get through without much embarrassment. The economy and despatch with which the 5th regt. moved over to Prarie du chien meets with my entire approbation. The contrast is great between this movement and that of the rifle regiment in 1816."p. 162
Correspondence of John C. Calhoun By John Caldwell Calhoun, John Franklin Jameson, "Account of Calhoun's early life, abridged from the manuscript of Col. W. Pinkney Starke", 1900
http://books.google.com/books?id=vZ4DsGxA1ZEC&printsec=frontcover

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 

Captain Joseph Calhoun Jr. (SC) - 1st Rifle Regiment - 3rd Rifle Regiment - postwar Rifle Regiment
Second Lt Rifle 2 Dec 1812 : First Lt 1st Rifle Jan 1814 : distinguished under Major Appling at Stony Creek : distinguished under Major L. Morgan Apr 1813 at Scajocada Creek: retained, May 1815, in Rifle. : Capt Mar 1817 : resigned 15 Apr 1818
*Conjocta (Conjocheta) Creek. Historic Name, Conjocta Creek. Secondary Names, Scajaquada Creek, Black Rock, Shoguoquady Creek, Conkuichity
"Joseph Calhoun, Second, was born July 22 1 787. He was educated by Dr. Moses Waddell, was commisioned in the United States Army and attained the rank of Captain. Was in the Richmond Theatre the night of the Great Fire, December 26, 1811 and was badly wounded in the Battle of Lundy's Lane. He married Frances Darricourt. They had nine children:...."
son of "Joseph Calhoun, son of William Calhoun and Agnes Long Calhoun was born October 22, 1750. He was a member of the Legislature of South Carolina, was a Colonel of Militia and in 1807 was elected to Congress where he served until 1811, when he was succeeded by his cousin John Caldwell Calhoun. He died April 14, 1[8]17. He married first his cousin Catherine Calhoun and married, second Martha or Patsey Moseley, daughter of William Moseley, of Virginia."p. 49
Notable Southern families, Volume 1, by Janie Preston Collup French,1918
http://books.google.com/books?id=mmtlAAAAMAAJ&printsec=frontcover

Captain Edward Carrington (VA) - 3rd Rifle Regiment
Sec lt 1 light drags 12 Oct 12 Capt 3 rifle Mar 14 disband June 16
"of Halifax County, Virginia, to whom his State presented a sword for gallantry in the War of 1812. "
 http://genealogytrails.com/vir/botetourt/bios.html
DEATH: 7 Mar 1855, Botetourt Co. Virginia
Father: Paul CARRINGTON Judge
Mother: Mildred Howell COLES
Family 1 : Eliza Henry PRESTON
sons
   1.  Edward Clement CARRINGTON, BG USA (veteran Mexican and Civil Wars)
   4.  William Campbell CARRINGTON C.S.A.
   5.  James McDowell CARRINGTON C.S.A.
   6.  Francis Preston CARRINGTON
 uncle=
CARRINGTON, Edward, soldier, was born in Charlotte county, Va., Feb. 11, 1749, younger brother of Paul Carriugton, the eminent patriot, jurist, and statesman. He was quartermaster-general in the war of the revolution, having been commissioned lieutenant-colonel of artillery Nov. 30, 1776. He was the brother-in-law of Chief Justice Marshall, and the confidential friend of Gen. Washington. He served as second in command to Gen. N athanael Greene, in his famous southern campaign, was taken prisoner at Charleston, S. C, and was greatly distinguished for his fidelity, efficiency, and courage, especially in the memorable retreat of the Dau, which river he had explored, and made preparations for the crossing of Greene's army. He commanded the artillery at Hobkirk's Hill and at Yorktowu. He was three times thanked at the head of the army for his gallantry in the field, and won the proud soubriquet of the "old Agamemnon," doubtless in consequence of his great personal prowess, imposing appearance, and dignity and sternness of manner. He was a member of the Continental congress, mayor of Richmond, Va., and foreman of the grand jury that indicted Aaron Burr for treason. When a war was apprehended with France, Gen. Washington, thinking himself too old to enter the field, recommended Edward Carrington to President Adams as a proper person to take command of the American army in the event of a war with that power. (SeeMarshall's "Lifeof Washington.") Gen. Carrington died in Richmond, Va., Oct. 28, 1810.
Captain Benjamin Desha (KY) - 2nd Rifle Regiment
First Lt 17th infy 6 Apr 1813 : not confirmed by Senate. Third Lt 1st Light Dragoons 2 July 1813: Capt 2nd Rifle. Mar 1814 : retained, May 1816, in 3rd infy — declined.
In 1838, Desha County* was created and named for Capt. Benjamin Desha, a War of 1812 veteran and wealthy landowner of Arkansas - Adjutant General of the Militia of Territory (?-1828). Indicated for bearing a challenge in the infamous Crittenden-Conway duel in 1828 (he was Crittenden's second), the indictment was later quashed in U.S. v. Desha (1828), was receiver of public monies in Little Rock in 1830; Benjamin Desha ran an unsuccessful race against Ambrose Hundley Sevier in 1831, sued Joseph Henderson and Richard C. Byrd for debt in Desha v. Henderson & Byrd (1833). - http://arcourts.ualr.edu/Personal-Names/names-c.htm - http://www.pccua.edu/keough/1827-1830s.htm - http://arcourts.ualr.edu/case-075/75.1.html
Brother of Robert Desha, Captain, 24th Infantry, who was wounded in action and breveted Major for gallant conduct in the attempt to reseize Ft Mackinac by a combined force of navy, marines, 2nd Rifle, 19th, 24th, & 28th Infantry and militia, led by Lt Colonel Croghan, 2nd Rifle Regiment
Son of Joseph Desha, who served in the Indian wars under Gen. Anthony Wayne and Gen. William H. Harrison in 1794; member of the Kentucky State house of representatives in 1797 and 1799-1802; served in the State senate 1803-1807; elected as a Republican to the Tenth and to the five succeeding Congresses (March 4, 1807-March 3, 1819, major general of Volunteers under Gen. William H. Harrison at the Battle of the Thames; Governor of Kentucky and served from 1824 to 1828. - http://bioguide.congress.gov/scripts/biodisplay.pl?index=D000271
[*Other notable Riflemen for whom counties were named included Smyth (VA), Forsyth (NC) and Appling (GA).]

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 

Captain William L. Dufphey (NC) - 3rd Rifle Regiment - postwar Rifle Regiment
Second Lt 10th infy 5 June 1812: transferred. Mar 1813 to 3rd Rifle : First Lt Apr 1813: Captain Aug 1814: retained, May 1815, in Rifle: resigned 15 Feb 1818
Stephen H Long mention of Captain Duffhey (sp) - "He received the wound in the instep where the tooth of the snake penetrated to the bone. He applied a bandage in the first instance, and resorted to medical aid as soon as it was practicable. When he was bitten he was in the woods four miles from home, consequently the poison must have had a considerable time to diffuse itself, before he could apply a remedy. His foot and leg swelled very much and became black, but the remedies applied proved efficacious, and he is now past danger, and is so far recovered that he is able to walk about with ease." - Stephen H. Long's Journals cited in Chapter Two: Rifleman in "A Stranger And a Sojourner: Peter Caulder, Free Black Frontiersman" p.67, several factual errors (example: [Thomas A.} Smith transferred from an artillery unit into the Third Rifles in 1808", p 37 there was no Third Rifles in 1808) but interesting vignettes.

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------  

Captain Abraham Fine (TN) - 3rd Rifle Regiment - postwar Rifle Regiment
Ensign 24th infy 1 Oct 1813: Second Lt 3rd Rifle Мar and First Lt Sept 1814 : retained Dec 1815, in Rifle : resigned 1 Oct 1816

Captain David Findley (PA) - original US Regiment of Riflemen
Captain Rifle 18 June 1808: died 1 July 1809 at Columbian Springs, Missouri.

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Captain Stoughton Gantt (KY) - 4th Rifle Regiment - postwar Rifle Regiment
Surgeons mate. Rifle. 2 June 1813 : First Lt 4. rifle. 17 Mar. 1814: distinguished in Brown's sortie from Ft. Erie: retained, May 1815, in Rifle.: regimental Paymaster 4 Mar. 1816: Captain Apr 1818: resigned 25 Apr. 1819.
Inspector general Colonel Arthur Perenneau Hayne described him as "One among the most intelligent & valuable Officers in the Regiment." Report of Inspection of the Ninth Military Department, 1819 - L. B. S. The Mississippi Valley Historical Review, Vol. 7, No. 3 (Dec., 1920), pp. 261-274 -
http://books.google.com/books?id=iToOAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA266#v=onepage&q&f=false
brother: John Gantt (Ken) Second Lt Rifle. 24 May 1817 : First Lt Apr. 1818 : Capt Feb. 1823: dismissed 12 May 1829.
The medical department of the United States army: from 1775 to 1873 By United States. Surgeon-General's Office
http://books.google.com/books?id=aIEtkhDnTcQC&pg=PA278

Nabb Research Center General Resources - People & Cultures
"William Stoughton Gantt Son of Edward and Ann Stoughton, his Wife was born in Prince Georges County in Maryland on the 26th Day of July Anno Dom 1771 and baptized at Christ Church in Queen Annes Parish on the 27th Day of September of the same year His Sponsors were Mrs. Eleanor Gantt Messrs. John Gantt and Basil Waring the Third."
http://nabbhistory.salisbury.edu/resources/people/so_parishregister2.html

[Father]; Edward Gantt (1746–1837) was an Episcopal clergyman who served as Chaplain of the Senate of the United States (1801–1804). Gantt returned home and for a time officiated in his native parish, Christ Church, Calvert County. On January 28, 1776 he began to preach at All Hallow’s Parish in Worcester County. Four years later he became rector of his native parish, and sustained himself by practicing medicine. In 1795 Gantt moved to Georgetown in the District of Columbia. His work in Washington continued to combine ministry and medicine as indicated by an invoice in the White House Historical Association's archives; the doctor’s bill for President Thomas Jefferson’s household dated March 22, 1802, lists the medical services provided to several servants by Dr. Edward Gantt. From President Jefferson, Dr. Gantt received a supply of smallpox vaccine; soon after January 17, 1802 he vaccinated Miami chief Little Turtle and a group of Miami diplomats who were in Washington, The supply sufficed to vaccinate over three hundred persons connected with the Executive Mansion. About 1807, under the auspices of Bishop Thomas John Claggett, he went to Kentucky, in the interests of the Episcopal Church. Personal life - Edward Gantt and Ann Stoughton Sloss, the daughter of Thomas and Mary Sloss, were married June 26, 1768, by the Rev. Thomas John Claggett, Gantt's cousin, later to be Bishop of Maryland. Their fifteen children include: Thomas Sloss Gantt, William Stoughton Gantt, Edward Sloss Gantt and John Gantt.
Gantt died near Louisville, Kentucky, in 1837.[7][8]
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edward_Gantt

Annals of St. Louis in Its Territorial Days, from 1804 to 1821, Frederic Louis Billon, 1888
"DOCT. ARTHUR NELSON, PHYSICIAN of St. Louis, married Miss Eleonora [Arnold], May 25, 1819.
Major Stoughton Gantt, Paymaster U. S. Army, a cousin of the Doctor, died here April 25, 1819.
Capt.‘ John'Gantt, another of the family, was a Capt. in the 6th Regiment U. S. Infantry, stationed for some years at Fort Atkinson, Council Bluffs."
http://books.google.com/books?id=knlQAQAAIAAJ&pg=PA286#v=onepage&q&f=false
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Captain Henry A. R. Graham (KY) - 1st Rifle Regiment
Second Lt 3rd infy 16 Feb 1801 : in 2nd infy Apr 1802: First Lt Dec 1803: resigned 31 Jan 1808; Captain 1st Rifle 8 Mar 1809: disbanded June 1815.

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Captain James S. Gray (VA-KY)- 1st Rifle Regiment - postwar Rifle Regiment
Third Lt Rifle. 20 May 1813: Second Lt 1st Rifle May 1814: retained, May 1815. in Rifle.: First Lt Mar 1817 : Capt Nov 1818: in 6th infy May 1821 : dismissed [cashiered] 15 Feb 1828.

"April. 17, 1872.— Ordered to be printed.
Mr. Davis, of West Virginia, made the following
REPORT:
[To accompany bill S. 9a3.]
The Committee on Claims, to whom was referred the petition of Margaret B. Franks, heir at law of Thomas L. Franks, deceased, hare had the same under .consideration, and report as follows :

The claim made is for compensation for supplies furnished and labor performed for the troops of the United States at Fort Crawford, in the now State of Wisconsin, in the years 1810 and 1817.........This voucher bears date of Fort Crawford, March 20, 1817, and its authenticity placed beyond question by the following indorsements thereon :

I certify on honor that the above account, amounting to $1,754.66|, was contracted for the use of the troops stationed at Fort Crawford by order of the commanding officer, Lieutenant Colonel F. Chambers.
JAMES S. GRAY, Lieutenant B. K., Acting Quartermaster. Approved.
F. CHAMBERS, Lieutenant Colonel, U. S. A.

Headquarters, Detroit, July 5, 1817. The above account has been laid before me for my approval, but tho items being so unusually high I have thought proper to refer the same to the War Department.
ALEX. McCOMB, Brevet Major General, Commanding.
The signature of General McComb is certified to by Brevet Brigadier General 1). S. Roberts, United States Army.
Late Payment!! - Congressional serial set, Issue 1483, by United States. Government Printing Office
http://books.google.com/books?id=Z0ILAAAAYAAJ&printsec=frontcover

"July 21. " From the Missouri Intelligencer.''
"Franklin, (Boonslick) July 2d, 1819.
"We announce with great satisfaction the arrival here, this day, of five large Keel Boats, with 260 troops, exclusive of officers, being a part of the expedition destined for the Yellow Stone. Our citizens were apprised of their approach by the firing of swivels from on board the boats, and every demonstration of joy and satisfaction was manifested at an event, the successful result of which, promises such important advantages, as well to this portion of the country as to the nation at large."
Colonel Talbott Chambers, Captain James S. Gray[regimental quartermaster], Lieutenant Scott, Lieutenant Keith and Doctor Malone were the officers who came with the troops.
pp. 24-26
"YELLOWSTONE EXPEDITION,"NOTES OF THE EARLY HISTORY OF THE NEBRASKA COUNTRY, Publications - Nebraska State Historical Society, Volume 20, by Nebraska State Historical Society, 1922

http://books.google.com/books?id=MJ0UAAAAYAAJ&printsec=frontcover


"James S. Gray commanded Company I. Muster Rolls, Sixth Infantry, RG 94."
Wheel boats on the Missouri: the journals and documents of the Atkinson-O'Fallon Expedition 1824-1826, by Henry Atkinson, Stephen Watts Kearny, Richard E. Jensen, James S. Hutchins, 2001
http://books.google.com/books?id=dn5eW976XpgC&printsec=frontcover

 Court Martial records, Fort Atkinson, 1819-1827 #17,372 includes trials of Lt. Charles Pentland, 1823, and Capt. James Gray, 1825. - http://www.nebraskahistory.org/lib-arch/research/public/federal_finding_aids/ft_atkinson.pdf

"[Atkinson's] actions at the Council Bluff was to order Lieutenant Gabriel Field to lay out a road from Camp Missouri to Chariton. ... During the following January and February, Captain James S. Gray with twenty- four men improved the road by..."
Navigating the Missouri: Steamboating on Nature's Highway, 1819-1935, by William E. Lass, Arthur H. Clark Co., 2008

?son of Major James Gray. Revolutionary War officer (captain and major), serving from 1775 to the end of the war, married Jane McClure of Rutherford Co.
grandson of Samuel Gray - who served in the military in 1744 in Muster Roll of Capt. John Buchanan. He died on 22 Apr 1775 in Tryon Co., NC.
http://familygenes.net/gray.htm
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Captain Joshua Hamilton (PA)- original US Regiment of Riflemen - 1st Rifle Regiment
Second Lt Rifle 18 June 1808 : First Lt Jan 1810 : Captain July 1812: severely wounded in action under Maj. L. Morgan, near Black Rock 3 Aug and died 31 Aug 1814

son of Alexander Hamilton, grandson of James Hamilton II Capt. on Gen. Washington's staff with his brother Alexander - great uncle was Statesman/U.S. Treasurer Alexander  Hamilton+ b. Jan 11, 1757, d. Jul 12, 1804
"Among the first to settle in the Pine Creek area was Alexander Hamilton, a Sotch-Irishman who came to America as a young man. He had settled along the Juniata River, but in 1772 he removed to the West Branch and marked off a tract a mile square.Afterward, believing he had more ground than he could profitable use , he gave half of his tract to John Jackson, who came from Orange County, NY. Both Hamilton and Jackson were good mechanics. As carpenters, joiners,wagon-makers, tanners, and blacksmiths their services were in great demand. These men with their families left their Pine Creek homes at the time of the Great Runaway of 1778. Arriving at Fort Augusta, Hamilton, at the urgent request of the commander, Colone Hunter, remained to help defend the fort. He was charged with enrolling and organizing the men from the West Branch to protect the settlement at what is now Sunbury and Northumberland. Several houses in the vicinity had been vacated and Hamilton's family occupied one of them until peace had been returned to that district . In the fall of 1781, he was ambushed and killed by roving Indians , just a short distance above the Northumberland on the North Branch . After peace was established, Hamilton's widow and children returned to Pine Creek and received from the State government a full title to their land..."

from 'A Picture of Clinton County' - Writers Program, PA Commissioners of  Clinton Co., PA., c 1942 
"He brought his family to Pine Creek from Cumberland County and settled on the river shortly above Pine Creek in 1773. He was on the Committee of Safety in 1776, was in command of Horn's Fort before the Big Runaway, and afterwards served with the county militia at Fort Augusta. Several of his sons served there with him. He was killed there while working on some crops outside the stockade, but his family returned to claim their father's improvement. Much had been written on this family. His wife was Anna (or Amanda)Reed. Their children were: John, who married Betsy Robinson; Robert, who married Anna Jackson and was already mentioned; William; James;George and Alexander, both of whom died in 1785; Sampson, who married Jane Miller and settled near Meadville, PA ; Joshua, killed in the War of 1812; and Nancy, who died at age twenty. The widowed mother, remarried to John Price, after returning to
Pine Creek. Daughter-in-law, Anna says of him-'Alexander Hamilton and Samuel Horn were competitors for the captaincy. Horn's men said Hamilton got a keg of whiskey to bye votes. This might have been a joke. He got most votes and commission, he was always call'd Captain'...."
http://www.mybalefamily.com/FamilyTree/Prescott-p/p458.htm


-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Captain Michael C. Hays (OH) - original US Regiment of Riflemen
First Lt Rifle. 3 May 1808: Captain June 1811 : resigned 30 Nov 1813

"First Lieutenant Michael C. Hays, promoted to Captain, vice John Ragan, resigned 1st June, 1811."
"22. *John Hays, Rockbridge Co.: Farmer: Major in Continental Army, participating in numerous battles of the Revolution, including the Capture of Burgoyne at Saratoga: Trustee Liberty Hall Academy, 1782-1807: Died 1808.
178. *Michael Hays, Rockbridge Co.: (Son of 22): Lawyer: Ohio: Captain U. S. Army."
Catalogue of the officers and alumni of Washington and Lee University, 1888, p. 48, p.56
http://books.google.com/books?id=nrpBAAAAIAAJ&printsec=frontcover&source=gbs_ge_summary_r&cad=0
"Major John Hays lived on a farm under the Jump mountain, Rockbridge. His sons were—1. Michael Hays, of Ohio, who was an officer in the United States Army in 1812; 2. Andrew Hays, a distinguished lawyer of Nashville, Tennessee ; 3. John Brown Hays, of Columbia, Tennessee, whose wife was a sister of President Polk ; and, 4. James Campbell Hays, of Tennessee and Texas, who was the father of Jack Hays, the Texan Ranger."p.158
Annals of Augusta county, Virginia, from 1726 to 1871, by Joseph Addison Waddell, 1902
http://books.google.com/books?id=rZbEC1kEdpcC&printsec=frontcover
"Major John Hays"bio at p. 91 "...a company that was afterwards attached to Morgan's Rifle Corps, of which John Hays,... was captain..."p. 57
Historical papers, Volume 1, by Washington and Lee University, 1890
http://books.google.com/books?id=SvZyHUFhs-IC&printsec=frontcover&output=text
"SALLIE HAYS, wife of Benjamin Lampton, and the maternal grandmother of Mark Twain, was near kin of Captain John Hays, who served in the War of the Revolution from Rockbridge County, Virginia,.."p. 99
Genealogy: a journal of American ancestry, Volumes 8-10, by William Montgomery Clemens, Lyman Horace Weeks, 1919
http://books.google.com/books?id=THJbAAAAMAAJ&printsec=frontcover
"...At this term [1806] the first attorney at law appears to have been admitted to practice at the Bar. It is thus recorded: "Came into Court Michael C. Hays, who took the oath to support the Constitution of the United States and the State of Ohio, and also the oath of olfice as an Attorney and Councellor at Law." p. 118
A history of the early settlement of Highland County, Ohio, by Daniel Scott, The Gazette, 1890
http://books.google.com/books?id=C04VAAAAYAAJ&printsec=frontcover
"He named his wife Ann and sons Michael and Andrew executors.31 Their children
were: a. Michael C. Hays. He moved to Ross County, Ohio. 32 b. Andrew Hays c.....John Hays...commissioned a captain in the Ninth Regiment Virginia Continental Line on 16 March 1776 and on 4 October 1777 was taken prisoner at Germantown, Pennsylvania...commissioned a major of the Third Regiment on 23 April 1778 and served until his retirement on 12 February 1781. He then returned to Rockbridge....conveyed seven slaves to his son Michael C. Hays on 31 August...died leaving a will which was dated 29 may 1808 and proved 2 January 1809, in which he bequeathed to his son Michael all property in Ohio, provided that the executors might sell his lands in Rockbridge [County Virginia]...Ohio"p. 95
The Farish family of Virginia and its forebears, by John Frederick Dorman, 1967
Hays, John, Gateway to the West, by Ruth Bowers, Anita Short, 1989, p.60
http://books.google.com/books?id=V5cl8YcmaN0C&printsec=frontcover

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Captain Llewellin Hickman (KY)- 2nd Rifle Regiment - Rifle Regiment
First Lt 2 rifle. 17 Mar. 44: retained, May 1816, in Rifle: Capt Feb. 1818: resigned 20 May '20.

St. Louis County Marriage Records, Hickman, Lewellen to St. Cyr, Agnes 5 May 1818
www.looktothepast.com/stlouiscountymarriages.html

"General Richard Hickman, son of James and his wife, Hannah Lewis, was born in Culpeper county, Virginia, in 1757, and was a Revolutionary soldier. He emigrated from Virginia to Kentucky with his father and others of the Hickman family to what is now Clark county. He was a farmer by occupation, with a mind far above mediocrity; having been raised in the colony of Virginia at a time when there were but few schools in the country, it could not be expected that his education was very thorough; notwithstanding, he was called from his plowhandles by the citizens of his county and elected as a member of the convention that formed the Constitution of Kentucky in 1799. He served his country over twenty years as Senator in the Kentucky Legislature. He was elected Lieutenant-Governor of Kentucky, and during this official term the war of 1812 occurred. The Legislature requested Governor Isaac Shelby to take the field in person against the Indians and command the troops of the State, which order he obeyed. During the absence of Governor Shelby on the military expedition, General Richard Hickman acted as Governor of the State. Hickman county in Kentucky was named in honor of General Richard Hickman. In 1787 General Richard Hickman married Lydia, the widow of Christopher Irvine, whose maiden name was Lydia Calloway, daughter of Colonel Calloway, who was killed by the Indians...On the 14th of July, 1776 (just seven mouths from their last attack), as three young ladies—two daughters of Col. Calloway (Lydia and Elizabeth) and the third, of Colonel Boone—were leisurely strolling in the woods, they were pursued by the Indians and caught before they could reach the gates of the fort...This romantic incident afforded Mr. Cooper, in his "Last of the Mohicans," an incident in his tale."
General Richard Hickman married, as above stated, Lydia Calloway, one of the three young ladies that were stolen by the Indians, by whom he raised five children, and died in Clark county, Kentucky, in 1832. His children were:
E 1. Captain Llewellen, born in 1788; married Agnes St. Cyr.
E 2. Elizabeth, born in 1790; married John L. Hickman.
E 3. Catharine, born in 1797; married General Wm. Prewitt.
E 4. Matilda, born in 1801; married Hon. Sam Hanson.
E 5. Caroline, born in 1803; married David K. Pitman.
E 1. Captain Llewellen Hickman, was an officer in the regular army during the war of 1812. He was stationed at Prairie du Chien, on the Mississippi river. He married Agnes St. Cyr, a French lady, of St. Louis, Mo., by whom he raised one son, and died in St. Louis, Mo. The name of his son is:
F 1. Llewellen St. Cyr Hickman. He married and is living in St. Charles, Mo.
Genealogy of the Lewis family in America: from the middle of the ..., Volume 1, by William Terrell Lewis, 1893, p.163
http://books.google.com/books?id=fu4wAAAAMAAJ&printsec=frontcover&output=text
two disputed facts from above:
"Notes for  LYDIA CALLOWAY: On 10 Apr 2002 Betty Taylor...It is Lydia's sisters Betsey and Frances Callaway who, with Daniel Boone's daughter Jemima, were in a canoe on the Kentucky River and were captured and carried away by the Indians, and that John Floyd, Boone, and others rescued. Theodore Roosevelt has this tale in His "Winning of the West."
http://familytreemaker.genealogy.com/users/s/t/e/Pat-M-Stevens-iv/BOOK-0001/0017-0010.html
Hickman County name - "Capt. Paschal Hickman, in honor of whom this county was named, was a native of Virginia; emigrated to Kentucky, when very young, with his father, Rev. Wm. Hickman, and settled in Franklin county; served in most of the campaigns against the Indians, and was distinguished for his activity, efficiency, and bravery; in 1812, was commissioned a captain, raised a volunteer company, and joined Col. John Allen, who commanded the 1st regiment of Kentucky riflemen. He was in the memorable battle of the river Raisin— where he was severely wounded, and like many kindred Kentucky spirits, was inhumanly butchered in cold blood by the savage allies of his Britannic majesty." p. 342
Collins' historical sketches of Kentucky: History of Kentucky, Volume 2, by Lewis Collins, Richard H. Collins, 1878
http://books.google.com/books?id=nnNKAAAAYAAJ&printsec=frontcover&output=text

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Captain Thomas F. Hunt (NC) - 3rd Rifle Regiment - postwar Rifle Regiment
Third Lt 1st Light dragoons 2 July 1818: Second Lt 3rd Rifle June 1814: retained, Dec. 1815, in 3rd infy: transferred Jan 1816 to Rifle: First Lt July 1817: Assistant Deputy quartermaster general (rank Capt) June 1818: Captain May 1820 : brevet Major ten years faithfull service 16 June 1828: Quatermaster (rank Major) 7 July 1838: Deputy quartermaster general (rank Lt colonel) 8 Nov 1839: brevet Colonel "for meritorious conduct particularly in performance of his duties in prosecuting the war with Mexico" 30 May 1848(Mar 1849) : Assistant quartermaster general rank Colonel) 16 Sep 1851.

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Captain Armstrong Irvine (PA) - 4th Rifle Regiment
Second Lt Light arty 1 Mar. 1811 : First Lt July 1812: distinguished at Chrystler's Fields 11 Nov. 1813: Capt 42nd Infy Oct. 1813: transferred May 1814, to 4th Rifle : retained, May 15, in Light Arty died 15 Jan. 1817.
The enemy now massed troops on his right wing, and pressed forward heavily, so that he captured one of the American guns; a charge of cavalry under Adjutant-General Walbach, and the coolness and bravery of Captain Armstrong Irvine, being all that prevented him from seizing the others. For two hours longer the contest swayed-to and fro across the miry fields for the distance of a mile, till the Americans brought up a reserve of six hundred men under Lieutenant-Colonel Upham, by which order was restored and the line firmly established, to await the next onset of the enemy. But no further assault was made, and in the night the Americans retired unmolested to their boats. This action is sometimes called the battle of Williamsburg, sometimes the battle of Chrysler's Field. Both sides claimed the victory, and there has been much dispute both as to the number of men engaged and as to the losses. The British probably had a thousand men, including Indians; the Americans seventeen hundred. General Wilkinson reported a loss of one hundred and two killed, and two hundred and thirty-seven wounded—one man in five. The British loss was reported at one hundred and eighty-eight killed, wounded, or missing—nearly one in five. Among the American officers who distinguished themselves on this field was Lieutenant William J. Worth, who afterward rose to eminence as a major-general.

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 

Captain Joseph Kean (VA) - 4th Rifle Regiment - postwar Rifle Regiment
Cornet Light dragoons 1 July 1808 : Second Lt July 1809 : First Lt May 1811 : Adjutant 1812: Captain 4th Rifle Маг 1814: retained May 1815, in Rifle: resigned 31 Mar 1817

Captain Jonathan Kearsley (PA) - 4th Rifle Regiment
First lieutenant 2d Regiment Artillery, 12 March 1812; 4th Rifle Regiment, 21 April 1814: brevet-captain 15 August 1814, for distinguished service at Fort Erie (wounded lost leg); assistant Adjutant-General, rank of major, 20 Aug 1814; discharged 15 June 1815; Collector of inter. Rev. Pen. Nov. '17.Recorder United States Land Office, Detroit, Mich 1820-28
 "
Jonathan Kearsley was born in Virginia  in 1789 and graduated from Washington College in Washington, Pennsylvania (now Washington & Jefferson College) in 1811.[1]  He was one of the founders of the Union Literary Society at Washington College.[2] He joined the Army the following year as a First Lieutenant in the Second Artillery Corps, eventually reaching the rank of Major. He fought in several battles during the War of 1812, including the Battle of Stoney Creek, Battle of Crysler's Farm, and the Battle of Chippawa (following the Capture of Fort Erie). In the latter battle, he was wounded, and one of his legs was amputated. The operation was performed incorrectly and he suffered pain for the rest of his life from it.
He held the office of Collector of Revenue Taxes in Virginia from 1817 until 1819, when he moved to Detroit and was appointed Receiver of Public Monies, a title which he held for thirty years. He lived on the corner of Jefferson Avenue and Randolph Street in Detroit.
He served as mayor  of Detroit two separate times, in 1826 and 1829. He also served on the Board of Trustees of the University of Michigan from 1827 to 1837, and again on its re-organized Board of Regents from 1838 until 1852.[3]
He died in 1859 and is buried in Elmwood Cemetery.[4]
Kearsley Community School District is named after him. 
Notes
 - Major Jonathan Kearsley, 2nd U.S. Artillery and 4th Rifle Regiment, Part I, Chap 3: The Regulars, The War of 1812 in Person: Fifteen Accounts by United States Army Regulars, by John C. Fredriksen, 2010, p. 51-69
http://books.google.com/books?id=kR7ONfMOeg4C&printsec=frontcover

Captain Mathew I Magee (PA) - 4th Rifle Regiment - postwar Rifle Regiment
Lieut 'Pittsburg Blues' 14 Aug. 1812: distinguished in actions under Colonel J. B. Campbell with Mississinewa Indians. 17 and 18 Dec 1812: commanded his company and distinguished in defence of Ft Meigs 5 May 1818. [Capt 42nd infy 1 Aug. 1813—declined.] Captain 4 Rifle. 17 Mar 1814: retained, Jan. 1816, First Lt Ordnance with brevet of Capt: Captain rank Feb. 1815: transferred Sept 1818 to Rifle: in 6th infy May 1821 : in 5th infy Aug. 1822: died 29 June 1824.

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Captain Wyly Martin (GA)- 3rd Rifle Regiment - post war Rifle Regiment
Third Lt 24th infy July and First Lt 39th infy 29 July 1813: Adjutant 1814: Capt 3rd Rifle. Mar 1814: retained, Dec 1815, in Rifle: resigned 21 July 1823
Inspector general Colonel Arthur Perenneau Hayne described him as "An attentive officer" Report of Inspection of the Ninth Military Department, 1819 - L. B. S. The Mississippi Valley Historical Review, Vol. 7, No. 3 (Dec., 1920), pp. 261-274 - doi:10.2307/1891224 This article consists of 14 page(s).
"Cantonment Martin, the first military post in Kansas under the authority of the United States government, was established on Isle au Vache, or Cow island, in Oct., 1818, when Capt. Wyly Martin, with a detachment of the .. rifle regiment, reached the island as the advance guard of Maj. Long's expedition and went into winter quarters. A fort of cottonwood logs was erected and named "Cantonment Martin," for the commander of the detachment. John O'Fallon, afterward a prominent citizen of St. Louis, was the post sutler. It was Capt. Martin's intention to vacate the cantonment early in the spring of 1819 and continue his march westward, but his supplies failed to arrive as expected, and he remained at the post until the arrival of the main body of the expedition under Maj. Long in July. A council was held here with the Kansas Indians. (See Long's Expedition.) Thomas W. Cutrer - http://skyways.lib.ks.us/genweb/archives/1912/c/cantonment_martin.html
-"Near Diamond island, about 5 miles above the mouth of the Little Platte, was noticed the ruin of an old French fortification or stockade. Below Independence creek were the old Kansas villages on the west side of the Missouri. At this place they found Capt. Martin with three companies of riflemen, who had left St. Louis in Sept., 1818, and arrived in October at Isle au Vache, where he had since remained, nearly all the time without provisions, his men subsisting almost wholly on the game which they killed. They were given a plentiful supply of provisions from the boat." - http://skyways.lib.ks.us/genweb/archives/1912/l/longs_expedition.html -
-"At Cow Island, Captain Wyly Martin was found with three companies of soldiers. He had been in camp there awaiting supplies since the previous October. The soldiers had killed three thousand deer and much other game during the winter." - www.kansasgenealogy.com/history/scientific_expedition.htm - Scientific Expedition of Major Stephen H. Long
Wyly (Wiley) Martin, (1776-1842) soldier, judge, and legislator, was born in Georgia in 1776. As a young man he worked as a clerk, as a teacher, and at a variety of other occupations. During the War of 1812 he was commissioned a third lieutenant in the Ninth United States Infantry on August 9, 1813. He served as a scout for Gen. William Henry Harrison and fought under Gen. Andrew Jackson at the battle of Horseshoe Bend, Alabama. He was promoted to first lieutenant in the Thirty-ninth Infantry (Sam Houston was a fellow LT) on July 29, 1813, and to captain of the Third Rifle Regiment on March 17, 1814. He was honorably discharged on June 15, 1815, and reinstated on December 2. On June 1, 1821, he transferred to the Sixth Infantry. He resigned his commission on July 21, 1823, reputedly because he killed a man** in a duel.[**Captain Thomas Ramsey - see below]
In 1825 he immigrated to Texas, where he was appointed alcalde of Stephen F. Austin's colony. In 1835 he was acting jefe político of the Department of the Brazos. He was a delegate from San Felipe de Austin to the conventions of 1832, 1833, and 1835. As a member of the so-called "Peace party," Martin disavowed the actions of William B. Travis and others of the "War party" at Anahuac (see ANAHUAC DISTURBANCES) and was opposed to Texas independence from Mexico; but with the coming of the Texas Revolution he signed the declaration of war against Antonio López de Santa Anna's Centralist regime, on November 7, 1835. At Bexar in December he drew a pen-and-ink sketch of Travis, the only known portrait of the man done from life. Martin raised a company that joined Sam Houston's army at Columbus. He was promoted to major and detached to guard the crossings of the lower Brazos River, then flanked out of his position at Fort Bend when the Mexican army crossed at the site of present Richmond. Although both Houston and secretary of war Thomas J. Rusk approved his action in falling back before superior numbers of the enemy, Martin was irate because he had been given an inadequate command- forty-six men-to observe the four fords and ferries he was responsible for holding. When he was ordered on April 13 to rejoin the main army at the Donaho plantation, he marched his force back to Houston's headquarters and relinquished his command. Subsequently, he was an outspoken opponent of Houston and his political policies. Martin saw little service for the remainder of the war, and on May 15 Rusk regretfully accepted his resignation. After independence Martin made his home in Fort Bend County, where he was appointed chief justice of the county on December 29, 1837, and was elected to the post on September 6, 1841. He was admitted to the bar in 1838. He was elected to represent Austin, Colorado, and Fort Bend counties in Congress. At age sixty-five, he was the oldest senator in the Sixth Congress of the Republic of Texas. He died at the home of Randal Jones in the Fort Bend settlement on April 26, 1842, in the interval between sessions. Martin County is named for him. BIBLIOGRAPHY: Francis B. Heitman, Historical Register and Dictionary of the United States Army (2 vols., Washington: GPO, 1903; rpt., Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1965). John H. Jenkins, ed., The Papers of the Texas Revolution, 1835-1836 (10 vols., Austin: Presidial Press, 1973). Texas House of Representatives, Biographical Directory of the Texan Conventions and Congresses, 1832-1845 (Austin: Book Exchange, 1941). Amelia W. Williams and Eugene C. Barker, eds., The Writings of Sam Houston, 1813-1863 (8 vols., Austin: University of Texas Press, 1938-43; rpt., Austin and New York: Pemberton Press, 1970).
- www.tsha.utexas.edu/handbook/online/articles/MM/fma64.html
Eighteen minutes: the battle of San Jacinto and the Texas independence campaign, by Stephen L. Moore, 2004, p. 90
http://books.google.com/books?id=MM9kRaMd28kC&printsec=frontcover
see Peter Martin, A StockRaiser of the Republic,  Chapter 6 in Black Cowboys of Texas, by Sara R. Massey
Wyly Martin to freed his slave Peter Martin who was born in Georgia during the period 1800-10, probably in Sumter County. Peter had served Wyly "from his boyhood," presumably including the decade that Wyly Martin served in the United States Army.


"YELLOWSTONE EXPEDITION.
in a paper entitled "Survey of Kansas Indian Lands," read January 15, 1889, before the Kansas State Historical Society, and printed in the fourth volume of "Kansas Historical Collections," page 303, writes:
"Captain Martin, in 1818, camped for the winter with three companies of TJ. S. Riflemen, on Cow Island, ten miles above Leavenworth, and during that winter killed between two and three thousand deer, besides great numbers of bears, turkeys, etc.''
I have often conversed with Mr. Calvert upon his stay at Cow Island. He said that hunting companies often crossed to the Missouri side, in Platte County, and found abundance of game. Indians were not found east of the Missouri."
Annals of Platte County, Missouri, from its exploration down to June 1,1897,by William McClung Paxton, 1897
http://books.google.com/books?id=xz8VAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA6

Early western travels, 1748-1846: a series of annotated reprints ..., Volume 14, edited by Reuben Gold Thwaites,1905
http://books.google.com/books?id=KukTAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA175

Guarding the frontier: a study of frontier defense from 1815 to 1825, by
Edgar Bruce Wesley, 1935
... Captain Wyly Martin in command. In his honor the camp was named Cantonment Martin. In the spring Lieutenant Colonel Willoughby Morgan was in charge of the troops, which in May numbered 272. The delayed arrival of supplies endangered ...
Martin - Ramsey Duel
"In days when duelling was a common practice, especially in the West, a land of free and independent spirits and fiery tempers, two early members of the lodge, Captain Thomas Ramsey, U.S.A., and John Sheets, became involved in disputes and sought settlement on the "field of honor." The first occurred in 1818, on Bloody Island, near St. Louis, a favorite duelling ground of the vicinity, when Captain Ramsey was shot and killed by Captain Wylie Martin, a brother officer (3)" (NB- (3) For the particulars of Captain Ramsey's death by duelling, the writer is indebted to Bro. Ray V. Denslow's valuable work, Territorial Masonry.) - http://ncharmony2.freemason.com/History_files/Pioneer%20Masonry.htm.
"In the following year, in August, 1818, Captains Martin and Ramsay, both of the First United States Rifles, fought another duel on Bloody Island, and at which Captain Ramsay received a mortal wound of which he shortly afterward died."p. 79
A History of Missouri from the Earliest Explorations and Settlements, Volume 3...,by Louis Houck,  R. R. Donnelley & sons company, 1908
http://books.google.com/books?id=nmcOAAAAIAAJ&printsec=frontcover
"[Bloody Island ]...two U.S. Army officers, Captain Thomas Ramsey and Captain [Wyly] Martin (the Gazette did not furnish his first name), made their was to its confines.  Both men were stationed at the cantonment, Bellefontaine , on the Missouri River.  The nature of their quarrel was not known nor were the names of seconds or surgeons.  on what was believed to be the first fire, Ramsey was struck by a muzzle ball; he died a few days later. He was buried with full military honors as well as Masonic honors.  The Gazette on August 7 regretted his death, claiming his "character as an officer and a gentleman" made him stand tall in the annals of heroes who gave up the comforts of civilian life "to breast the storm of savage warfare, or the more savage British" in the recent war.  Although military regulations called for Martin to be court-martialed, he "retained his command and was soon head of a cantonment on the Missouri river...."p. 37
Duels and the roots of violence in Missouri, by Dick Steward, University of Missouri Press, 2000
http://books.google.com/books?id=-EafIWg52d0C&printsec=frontcover

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Captain Abraham A. Massias (NY-PA)- original US Regiment of Riflemen - 1st Rifle Regiment
First Lt Rifle 3 May 1808 : Captain July 1809 : submitted as Major ~ 4th rifle 17 Sept., BUT NEGATIVED by Senate 10 Dec 1814 (RG-religious prejudice?)] commanded detachment at Point Peter Georgia, captured by the enemy, 13 Jan. 1815, but saved the detachment: disbanded June 1815. Paymaster 12 Dec 1820: disband 23 Sept 1842.

"First Lieutenant May 3d, 1808. He became Captain on July 1st, 1809; afterwards Major; and in 1820 was Paymaster in the United States Army" - from The Jews of Philadelphia: Their History from the Earliest Settlements....By Henry S. Morais, 1894

Publications of the American Jewish Historical Society, Issue 26,  "Abraham A. Massias" pp. 192-193
http://books.google.com/books?id=ysU8AAAAIAAJ&pg=PA192#v=onepage&q&f=false
Jews in the War of 1812-Huhner
"Abraham A. Massias, whose achievement is prominently detailed in practically every history of the war.
The family of Major Massias seems to have come from Barbados, and had probably settled at Charleston, for a Benjamin Massias of Barbados is mentioned as a trustee in the deed to the Cuming Street Cemetery of that city.131
Abraham Massias was born in 1772 and is mentioned at Newport, Rhode Island, in 1800.132 He was appointed ensign in 1802 133 and lieutenant in the New York Militia in 1804.134 Though residing in New York at the time, he appeared also as a member of the Congregation Beth Elohim of Charleston. He became Captain of the First Regiment of Light Infantry of New York, in 1807, but resigned in 1809 135 and entered the service of the United States, at first as Captain, and in 1814 as Major in the regular army.136
The British made several attempts to enter Georgia from the sea. They landed at Cumberland Island and made an effort to hold it, but were so vigorously attacked by a small force under Captain Massias that they were compelled to retreat to their boats.137 Another writer detailing this achievement, states:
that the enemy attacked Point Petre on the St. Marys, sending 1500 men in boats up the river for that purpose; hut the fortifications were good, and the garrison under Major Massias made so
193
brave a show that the English concluded that the post was too strong to he carried, and withdrew.138 [RG-Not so]
A very full account of the bravery and daring of Major Massias and his sixty riflemen, and of the heavy loss which they inflicted upon the British, is given in Williams' "History of the War of 1812," 139 and also in White's "Historical Collections of Georgia," where this achievement is detailed at some length.140 I have also found Major Massias' reports of the affair at Point Petre, made to
General Boyd, and published in Brannan's "Official Letters of the Military and Naval Officers of the United States," in 1823.141 In 1818 when Colonel Brackenridge made his famous plea for the removal of Jewish disabilities in Maryland, he made special reference to the valuable services of this Jewish officer.142
Major Massias became Paymaster in the United States Army in 1820. He was a devout Hebrew, and a trustee of the De Costa burial ground in Charleston, in which city he died in 1848. His remains are interred near the remains of the famous Salvador family, and his tombstone records his twenty
years' service in the field, his rank in the army and the fact that he was a benefactor of the Jewish Congregation of Charleston. 143 "

131  B. A. Elzas, " The Old Jewish Cemeteries at Charleston," 1903, p. 4; N. Darnell Davis, in Publications, supra. No. 22, p. 178.
132 "Proceedings of the Grand Lodge of Rhode Island, 1791-1820," supra; Samuel Oppenheim, "The Jews in Masonry," Publications, supra. No. 19, p. 19.
133 "Military Minutes," supra, vol. i, p. 586.
134 Ibid.
135 Ibid., vol. ii, pp. 923, 924.
136 Heitman, supra, p. 696; Hamersly, supra, pp. 70, 108,
171; Morais, supra, p. 459.
137 See Georgia Historical Society, vol.lv, p. 219; "Memoirs of Georgia," Southern Historical Association, 1895, vol. i, p. 96; Smith, "History of Georgia," p. 524.
138 "Life of William Lowndes," p. 119. This account states that Massias had been an officer in the American Revolution. The statement is erroneous, however, and refers to another member of his family who fought in the War for Independence. I am indebted for this reference to Mrs. Lee
C. Harby, of Charleston, S. C.
139 Rev. S. Williams, " Sketches of the War between the United States and the British Isles, supra, p. 287, et seq.
140 George White, "Historical Collections of Georgia," New York, 1855, pp. 287-288; Stephen F. Miller, "The Bench and Bar of Georgia," 1858, vol. i, p. 458.
141 Washington, 1823, pp. 470-474.
142 See Speech of Col. J. W. D. Worthington, published in "Speeches on the Jew Bill," by H. N. Brackenridge, Philadelphia, 1829.
143 "The Old Jewish Cemeteries," supra, 1903, pp. 104-106; Samuel Oppenhelm, in Publications, supra, No. 19, p. 20; Markens, supra, p. 179.
----------------------------
George White, "Historical Collections of Georgia," New York, 1855, pp. 287-288
http://books.google.com/books?id=oWIGNjgAlpkC&pg=PA287#v=onepage&q&f=false
Camden County
"On the 11th of January, 1815, the British effected a landing on Cumberland Island, in two divisions, with nineteen barges, assisted by two look-out boats, and flanked by two gun barges. At first they showed a disposition towards the bay; but ascertaining that the Americans were prepared to receive them, they changed their course, and took the Plum Orchard passage, keeping Cumberland close
288
ahead. The first division effected its landing at Dungeness; the se cond at the Plum Orchard. On the morning of the 13th January, 1815, the enemy, with fifteen hundred men, moved against Point Petre. Captain A. A. Messias [RG-Massias] received information of the approach, and, aware of his intentions to place himself in his rear while he was advancing in considerable force in front, to attack the battery on the St. Mary's, with a view to cut off Messias' retreat, he ordered Captain Stallings to remain at the
Point, with about thirty-six effectives, with orders to defend it as long as possible, and if he should be
overpowered to spike the guns, fire the train at the magazine, and retreat to him with the remainder, about sixty riflemen and infantry. Messias' detachment moved against the enemy in the rear, determined to oppose his passage at a narrow defile near Major King's, at Which they came about nine o'clock. This defile was flanked by a marsh on each side, and had a complete cover for riflemen on the right and left, across which the day before Messias had caused some large trees to be fallen. It was the intention of Messias to gain the cross-roads near Major King's; but finding himself stopped, Lieutenant Holtfof the 43d infantry, was ordered, with a detachment of riflemen, to advance on the enemy's left, and Lieutenant Harllee, with another detachment, to pass the thicket, and endeavour togain his rear, which order was promptly obeyed. Captain Tattnall, of the 43d infantry, was ordered at the same time to advance in close column and pass the defile. At this moment the enemy's bugle sounded, and a brisk fire commenced on both sides. The Americans had already passed some distance, and the enemy had given away twice, when Captain Tattnall received a severe wound which obliged him to fall back, and the number of the enemy appearing too imposing, a thousand to sixty, a retreat was ordered, which was effected in good order, without the loss of a man. In this baltle, Captain Tattnall, Sergeant Benson, and Private Greene, are mentioned as having acted bravely. All did their duty.One among the most remarkable feats ever recorded in the annals of war took place on the St. Mary's River in the year 1815. Twenty-three barges, filled with British soldiers, ascended St. Mary's River for the purpose of burning Major Clarke's mills, as a retaliation for breaking his parole. The St. Mary's is a very crooked river, from sixty to one hundred yards wide. The enemy intended to land at a place called Camp Pinckney, and march to Clarke's mills, which were situated on Spanish Creek, three miles distant from St. Mary's River. Whilst the barges were ascending, they were attacked by a party of twenty-eight men under the command of Captain William Cone. As soon as they were attacked they fired their cannon; but the palmetto on both sides of the river served as a screen for Cone's men, so that the shot from the enemy proved harmless. In this manner the barges were harassed for several miles, Cone's men taking advantage of every turn of the river to fire upon them, and every shot brought down a man. Finding them
289
selves exposed to so deadly a fire, the barges retraced their course towards St. Mary's. Upon their arrival at the latter place, they reported one hundred and eighty men killed, and as many wounded"

Secret Acts, Resolutions, and Instructions, Under Which East Florida Was Invaded by the United States Troops, Naval Forces, and Volunteers, in 1812 and 1813, together with the Official Correspondence of the Agents and Officers of the Government, etc. Cooper, James, Sherman, Charles E., G.S. Gideon, printer Washington D.C, 1860
http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00000608/00001

The Patriot War and Fort Mose: contains the five part series U.S. Troops in Spanish East Florida, 1812-1813, by T. FREDERICK DAVIS, Florida Historical Quarterly, Part I. July, 1930; Part II. October, 1930; Part III. January, 1931; Part IV. April, 1931; Part V. July, 1931
http://fortmose.com/patriot_war.html

Florida Fiasco: Rampant Rebels on the Georgia-Florida Border, 1810-1815, by Rembert W. Patrick, 1954, University of Georgia Press, 2010http://dlg.galileo.usg.edu/ugapressbks/pdfs/ugp9780820335490.pdf
"The Florida Historical Quarterly," 28 (1) (July, 1949),  Rembert W. Patrick, ed., "Letters of the Invaders of East Florida, 1812." pages 53-65
http://palmm.fcla.edu/fhq/


from Chapter 6 in Florida Fiasco: Rampant Rebels on the Georgia-Florida Border, 1810-1815, by Rembert W. Patrick, 1954, University of Georgia Press, 2010
http://books.google.com/books?id=JWc3cvE0Kk0C&printsec=frontcover

"In August, [Smith]....substituted Captain Abraham Massias into the command and recalled Ridgeway to Fort Mose.  Despite the change, anger over the American occupation continued to smolder on Amelia Island.  Massias was regarded as a hard but just man by some and as little better than Risgeway by others.  The task of governing Fernadina suited him, however, for campaigning in Florida had broken his health, and he was no longer able to remain active on the front lines. He showed no sympathy towards the Spanish loyalists, yet he did reinstitute many Spanish laws and regulations in order to maintain order and to clamp down on the smuggling trade....." pp. 203-204
"The inefficiency of the supply lines and the crass indifference of the War Department to his detachment's predicaments troubled Smith deeply.  Despite this, American forces did manage to entrench themselves in several new outposts.  Smith hoped, with support from Georgia, to break out of stalemate and initiate action...."p. 211
Capt Ridgeway wrote his brother: "Our Supplies as to Hospital Supplies and provisions are bad.  We are now become sickly.  Our aim is at Fort St. Augustine.  Five times the force we have will not be able to take it by storm...We musr hem them in and starve them out but even our present force will not do that, for the Spanish have the Indians to Sculp[sic] us when they can find us."p. 222

Congressional serial set, Issue 224, Abraham A. Massias pp.411-
http://books.google.com/books?id=Gp0ZAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA411#v=onepage&q&f=false
January 12, 1832.
Mr. Ward, from the Committee on Military Affairs, made the following
REPORT:
The Committee on Military Affairs, to whom was referred the petition of Major Abraham Ji. Massias, report:

Historical Dictionary of the War Of 1812, Robert Malcomson
Scarecrow Press, Jan 30, 2006
http://books.google.com/books?id=DRqpoBEEoloC
Cumberland Island Campaign (January-March 1815)

The Other War of 1812: The Patriot War and the American Invasion of Spanish, by James G. Cusick, 2007
http://books.google.com/books?id=BxHE3OsgU9EC&printsec=frontcover


The Cana Sanctuary:History, Diplomacy, and Black Catholic Marriage in Antebellum St. Augustine, Florida, by Frank Marotti, University of Alabama Press, Apr 5, 2012
http://books.google.com/books?id=aSZZ3LQoO9gC

The Cana Sanctuary uses the collective testimony from more than two hundred Patriot War claims, previously believed to have been destroyed, to offer insight into the lesser-known Patriot War of 1812 and to constitute an intellectual history of everyday people caught in the path of an expanding American empire.

"Captain Abraham Massias, in contrast, was “rough, ungentlemanly abusive and in some instances oppressive after using in his intercourse, the harshest terms.” Moreover, Massias “sometimes confin[ed] the people of the island in the stocks, and at others [put] them in close prison."...was "hated." p.77

"Jan. 13. Capture of Point Petre, Geo, near St Mary's, defended by about 90 men, under Capt A. A. Massias of the 1. rifle.; against a British force of from 1000 to 1500 men, white and black. Our loss was 1 killed and 4 wounded: their loss not stated."
A dictionary of all officers: who have been commissioned, or have been, by Charles Kitchell Gardner, 1853,  p. 572
http://books.google.com/books?id=-0VHAAAAYAAJ&printsec=frontcover

"The military importance of Point Peter near St. Marys had been recognized prior to this time and between the years 1793 and 1805 almost sixteen thousand dollars had been spent for the fortification there. However, in 1806 a military directive ordered the removal of the garrison and suggested that St. Marys could best be defended with gunboats armed with heavy cannon and aided by a fixed battery. It was not until 1809 that plans were made for the battery and for a strong block house at Point Peter (War Dept. Records).
In 1812, the commandant at the new fortification was Lieutenant Colonel Thomas A. Smith; acting commandant was Jacint Laval: and Abraham Massias was second in command. In 1[8]13, eight hundred reserves, available should Great Britain occupy East Florida and invade Georgia were kept in training at Point Peter. But before actual warfare, most of the troops were withdrawn and moved into other positions along the Atlantic, leaving the military force at Point Peter drastically reduced....Early in January 1815, before the battle of Point Peter and before the occupation of St. Marys, a letter was sent to Governor Peter Early of Georgia from the inhabitants of Camden County appealing for help for this, the weakest part of the state with "a scattered population and a seaboard and frontier more extensive than any other county in the state." The governor was informed that many of the inhabitants in the county had left and others were preparing to go. A request was made for a chain of blockhouses and a competent military force. The British arrived before military assistance, and Captain Massias had a detachment of only ninety-six men to defend Point Peter.
The British forces under the command of Admiral Cockburn sailed into Cumberland South with a fleet of two ships, seven frigates, several smaller armed vessels, and nineteen barges, with both naval men and fifteen hundred British Colonial and Negro troops aboard. The British invaded Cumberland Island with one division landing at Dungeness and the other at Plum Orchard, where they occupied an abandoned U. S. Marine installation. Two days after the landing on January 13, 1815, the British attacked Point Peter, where only thirty-six men had been left to defend the fort while Massias moved across land toward Kings Bay. A line of battle was formed at a place since known as Battle Hummock, but Massias and his men were compelled to withdraw to a point near Fort Barrington on the Altamaha River. Among the thirty-six men left to defend the fort, fourteen were soon casualties so the fort wwas abandoned. (Vocelle and Arnow) The British then burned the barracks at Point Peter, towed away all vessels at St. Marys and occupied the town for about a week...(Reddick 1976:26-27)
Reddick, Marguerite, compiler, 1976 Camden’s Challenge, A History of Camden County, Georgia. Camden County Historical Commission, Woodbine, Georgia."
Point Peter and the St. Marys River Forts,  LAMAR Institute Publication 62
http://shapiro.anthro.uga.edu/Lamar/images/PDFs/publication_62.pdf

"The skirmish at Point Peter was one of the last known battles of the War of 1812. It was fought even after peace was signed. The British attacked the battery at Point Peter, overwhelming the small American force. After the skirmish, British troops remained at Point Peter, looting the town of St. Marys and nearby plantations. The skirmish returned to public consciousness in 2003, when archaeological excavations rediscovered the site."
Forgotten Invasion - Point Peter's (GA) role in the War of 1812.
http://www.forgotteninvasion.com/index.html

"American force of 160 soldiers of the 43rd Infantry Regiment and the Rifle Corps under Captain Abraham A. Massias."-wiki

" I have the pleasure to anticipate the best of conduct in the officers and men under me : though few, they are well chosen, and discover great eagerness for battle : they behaved well the day we prepared to receive the enemy." - Captain Massias, 1st rifle corps, U.S,  to Brigadier General Floyd, 11 January 1815
"Unless reinforcements are forwarded, this country is lost." - Lieutenant Colonel Scott to BG Floyd,  12 January 1815.
"... I lament the necessity of informing you of the loss of the fort at Point Petre, I console myself with a consciousness of having done my best for its preservation, and of being peculiarly fortunate, in making good a retreat, always doubtful, and by none believed practicable but myself...."Captain Massias, 1st rifle corps, U.S, to BG Floyd, 13 January 1815
"...captain Massias would not co-operate with me, which was the cause of my falling back to this place yesterday." Lieutenant Colonel Scott to BG Floyd,  18 January 1815.

Letter[s] from Captain Massias and Lieutenant Colonel Scott to Brigadier General Floyd, from ST MARY'S &c From the Savannah Republican of January 17, Niles Weekly register, Volume 7
http://books.google.com/books?id=JmgAAAAAYAAJ&dq=captain%20massias&pg=PA361#v=onepage&q=captain%20massias&f=false


-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Captain James McGunnegle (PA) - postwar Rifle Regiment
Ensign 5th infy 3 Jan and Sec Lt Mar. 1812: First Lt Paymaster 1814: retained, May 1815, in Rifle: Capt July and Ast Deputy Quatermaster general. (rank Capt) Sept 1818 : in 6th infy and Ast Quartermaster May 1821 : died 27 Aug. 1822 at St. Louis Missouri. Inspector general Colonel Arthur Perenneau Hayne, who erroneously cited his name as "I M Gunnigh," described him as "Intelligent & industrious & in every respect a valuable Officer" Report of Inspection of the Ninth Military Department, 1819 - L. B. S. The Mississippi Valley Historical Review, Vol. 7, No. 3 (Dec., 1920), pp. 261-274 - doi:10.2307/1891224 This article consists of 14 page(s).
U.S. Army Quartermaster for St Louis area circa 1821. died on 27 Aug 1822 in St Louis. - http://www.historicpa.net/bios/2g/george-kennedy-mcgunnegle.html

"19 April 1820
....It is insisted that no part of this delay was occasioned by the government; but that Colo[nel] Johnson himself was not prepared to move until the time at which he did set out.  In support of which assertion I refer to the depositions of Colo[nel Talbot] Chambers, of Maj[o]r [Thomas] Hempstead, of Capt. [James] McGunnegle and of Colo[nel] Atkinson....."p. 58
see also pages 65, 153-154, 255, 325, 342, 347, 349, 388
"16 September 1820
Capt J[ames] McGunnegle, Assistant Deputy Quartermaster General,St. Louis...relays reports of several failures by James Johnson's boats. [steam boats]...."p.355

"To R[ichard] M. Johnson
Depart[men]t of War, 4 Oct[obe]r 1820
...The objection which you appear to urge most, is the supposed hostility of the Quarter Master at St. Louis [James McGunnegle] against your brother [James Johnson]; and the belief, that in consequence he would not [sic] justice done him.  I cannot for a momemnt believe, that Capt. McGunnegle would so far forget what is due to his own character and the publick interest as to betray your brother's bid; but in order to put your mind at ease, and to remove all cause of suspicion, he has been directed to open the bids in the presence of Gen[era]l [Henry Atkinson, should he be there, and if he should not be there, in the presence of some person of known respectability...."pp.374-375
Papers, Volume 5; Volumes 1820-1821, by John Caldwell Calhoun, 1971
http://books.google.com/books?id=h0XF0jdmXTkC&printsec=frontcover

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Captain James S. McIntosh (GA) - 1st Rifle Regiment - postwar Rifle Regiment
Second Lt Rifle. 13 Nov. 1812: First Lt It Dec. 1813: distinguished under Maj. Appling at Sandy Creek : wounded under Maj. L. Morgan, in affair near Black Rock 3 Aug. 1814: retained, Dec. 1815, in Rifle. : Capt Mar. 1817 : transferred Sept 1818, to Ordnance: in 4th infy May 1821 : bvt Major 'ten yrs. faithful service 8 Mar. 1827: Major 7th infy 21 Sept. 1836: Lt colonel 5th infy 1 July 1839: bvt Colonel "for gallantry and distinguished service in battles of Palo Alto and Rio de la Palma" 9 May 1846 (Aug 1846) in which he was dangerously wounded: commanded his brigade in Worth's division and distinguished, in battle of Churubusco: commanding a brigade and distinguishing in the storming of Él Molino 8 Sept 47, in which again severely wounded and died of his wounds 26 Sept 1847.
Col. James Simmons McIntosh's official report concerning the battle of August 20 1847 - Battle of Contreras and Churubusco Official Reports
"At Molino del Rey was supposed to be a cannon foundry, and it was thought by General Scott that a large quantity of powder was stored there. General Worth was ordered to make the attack, carry the enemy's lines, and destroy the ordnance works and return to his former position. To carry out this order General Worth directed General John Garland's brigade to be posted on the right with two pieces of Simon H. Drum's battery, so as to prevent re-enforcements from Chapultepec, and to be in position to support, if necessary, the assaulting forces; the guns of Captain Benjamin Hugér to be placed on the eminence to Garland's right and rear; a storming party of some five hundred picked men under Brevet Major George Wright, Eighth Infantry, to take post near and to the right of Hugér's battering guns, to attack the battery in the center of the enemy's lines; Clarke's brigade under Colonel James S. McIntosh and Captain James Duncan's battery opposite the enemy's right to support the assaulting column; Cadwallader to be held in reserve; and Major Edwin V. Sumner with his cavalry to be posted on the extreme left. Some changes were made in the disposition of the Mexican forces. Early on the morning of the 8th Hugér with two 24-pounders opened fire, and the assaulting column under Major Wright advanced under a heavy fire of grapeshot from the Mexican center and left. Undismayed, they pushed forward now under fire of musketry, captured a battery, and turned it upon the enemy, who fled in confusion. They were soon re-enforced, and rallied and reopened fire not only from their lines but from the housetops and walls. The storming party was driven back, but Duncan's battery opening fire at this time checked the Mexican advance. The light battalion of Colonel Charles F. Smith, now under command of Captain Edmund (RG- no, under his brother Ephraim killed at Molino Del Rey) Kirby Smith, Fifth Infantry, moved forward, supported by a part of Cadwallader's brigade, and this was followed by a forward movement of Garland's brigade and Drum's battery. This movement was irresistible, and the Mexicans fell back, bravely contesting every inch of ground. Pending the fire of Duncan's battery, one section of the battery, under Lieutenant Henry J. Hunt, opened fire on the enemy's lines between the Casta Mata and Molino del Rey. McIntosh fought in close quarters, and charged and drove the enemy in his front, but received three wounds, one of which proved mortal. General Alvarez, commanding the Mexican cavalry, was held in check by the voltigeur regiment under command of Major E.V. Sumner, and Duncan's battery. The fight was continued obstinately and bravely by the Mexicans from the roofs of houses. The main force of the enemy, having been driven toward Chapultepec, were rallied by General Peña Y. Barragan, and made an advance. Captain Drum was ordered forward, and with a captured six-pounder cleared the road. The battle lasted for more than two hours and was hotly contested by the Mexicans. Those who escaped death or capture retreated to Chapultepec, leaving General Worth in full possession of their lines. Worth's loss was one hundred and sixteen killed and six hundred and seventy-one wounded, a total of seven hundred and eighty-seven."- General Scott - General Marcus J. Wright, in Great Commanders, 1893 - http://www.gutenberg.org/files/17444/17444-8.txt
Fort McIntosh (TX) was established in early 1849 as one of a chain of border forts. The Mexican War has just ended and Laredo, Texas was an easy crossing point for Mexicans and Indians determined to raid into the U.S. Originally named Camp Crawford, the fort was renamed to Fort McIntosh in 1850 to honor Lieutenant Colonel James Simmons McIntosh, who had been killed at the Mexican War Battle of Molino del Rey.
Portrait at James Simmons McIntosh, Colonel of the 5th United States Infantry
Col. James Simmons McIntosh, U. S. A. (1787-1847) son of Lieut. Col. John McIntosh, (1755-1826) commandant of Fort Morris when the British demanded its surrender, and he replied, "Come and take it." He displayed great bravery at Briar Creek, 1779, where he was wounded and taken prisoner - born and died in McIntosh county, Ga; grandson of William McIntosh (1726-96), served in the Continental Army and was delegate to the first Provincial Congress at Savannah, 1775. He was born in Scotland; died in Darien, Ga. His brother Lachlan was a distinguished brigadier general.-Lineage Book By Daughters of the American Revolution. His son Lieutenant and later Captain Leonidas McIntosh served with the Voltigeur Regiment in the Mexican War: "Gen. John McIntosh, son of Col. William McIntosh, was the father of Maj. William Jackson McIntosh, Maj. John Nash McIntosh and Col. James Simmons McIntosh of the United States Army and Mexican War, whose sons were Capt. Leonidas McIntosh of Mexican War and Gen. John Baillie McIntosh of the Federal Army, who lost a leg [battle of Opequan, Virginia], and his brother Gen. James McQueen McIntosh of the Confederate Army, killed at Oak Ridge [Pea Ridge]..."- A SKETCH OF THE McINTOSH FAMILY - The Magazine of History with Notes and Queries - Contributor Published 1908 http://books.google.com/books?id=vAANd1w5WvYC&printsec=frontcover

- To Mexico with Scott: letters of Captain E. Kirby Smith to his wife, by Ephraim Kirby Smith Johnston
http://books.google.com/books?id=qMRDZeIwd7AC&printsec=frontcover
Mcintosh, Colonel, pages 46, 52, 54,182, 183, 213
Scott, Major, pages 101, 104, 113, 120, 124, 129, 130, 149, 155, 156, 213

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 

Captain John O'Fallon (KY) - 2nd Rifle Regiment - postwar Rifle Regiment
Ensign 1st infy 28 Sept 1812: Second Lt Jan. 1813: Aide de Camp to MGen Harrison, and acting assistant adjutant general in siege of Ft Meigs May 1813: First Lt 24 infy Aug 1813 : Capt 2nd Rifle Mar 1814 : retained, May 1815, in Rifle : resigned 31 July 1818.
"John O'Fallon testified that for nearly the last two years he had been "actively employed in transporting merchandise, etc., for the troops up the river Missouri, and the last year as high up as the Council Bluffs; which place I have once visited in that time" - FIRST STEAMBOATS UP THE MISSOURI - http://www.rootsweb.com/~neresour/OLLibrary/collections/vol17/v17p162.htm
O'FALLON, JOHN (1791-1865) John O'Fallon, a St. Louis merchant, banker, and philanthropist, was widely praised after his death as a model of business success and civic spirit, the ideal "self made man." - Dictionary of Missouri Biography By Lawrence O. Christensen, 1999, p.579
- One of St. Louis' best regarded benefactors. He was born near Louisville, Kentucky; his mother was the sister of explorers George R. and William Clark. His father came from a line of Irish kings that traced its history back to 1170. At the battle of Tippecanoe in the War of 1812 Colonel O'Fallon was severely wounded; Tecusmseh, leader of the Indian Confederacy allied with the British, was defeated. O'Fallon is believed to have come directly to St. Louis where he was associated for a while with his uncle, William Clark, an Indian Affairs agent. In 1818, O'Fallon resigned his commission in the army for a business career. He made money rapidly and gave it liberally. He was a director of several banks and first president of the Missouri Pacific, the Baltimore and Ohio, and the Wabash Railroads. The Lindell and Planters Hotels were large stock holdings of his. More than $1,000,000 was given by this generous benefactor to charity and the land for St. Louis University was his gift. He built the Pope Medical College for his son-in-law, Charles Pope. It later became Washington University Medical School. O'Fallon Poly Tech founded by him, also later became part of Washington University. O'Fallon Park was his country estate. His mansion was built on an Indian mound. This was learned when the builders, while excavating, found Indian skeletons and pottery. Streets in O'Fallon Park area today bearing names such as Mary, Alice, Emily, John, Adelaide, Algernon, Clarence and Pope were named for members of his family. Colonel O'Fallon was so highly regarded by St. Louisians that business was suspended the day of his funeral. Robert Campbell, General William Harvey and Henry Shaw were among his pallbearers. The monument in the center of lot, mounted by the angel of hope, was designed by George I. Barnett. This is the largest lot in Bellefontaine. O'Fallon was eulogized at his funeral thus.."The munificence of his charities lithographed in our very streets and was yet far exceeded by his private charities and benevolences" - http://stlouis.missouri.org/ofallon/history.htm
- brother Benjamin O'FALLON, (1793-1842) was prominent in Missouri as an Indian agent and advocate of the American fur-trade interests in the 1820s. p 577-8
Contemporaries normally referred to Benjamin as "Mr. O'Fallon" until 1819, when appointment as an Indian agent conferred the honorary rank of major. Thereafter he was always "Major O'Fallon." John came to Missouri as "Captain O'Fallon" in 1817. In December 1820 he awarded himself the title of colonel, and was addressed as "Colonel O'Fallon" from that time onward...
- "John Benjamin O'Fallon: (1791 - 1865) He was the son of James O'Fallon & Frances E.Clark and married 1st.to Harriett Stokes and married 2nd.to Ruth Caroline Sheets. His children were: Ellen, William, Harriett, Caroline (m. Dr.Charles Alexander Pope), James J. (m. Ann Harris), Benjamin (m.1st.to Sallie Champe Carter & m.2nd.to Mary Shreve Carter), Henry A. & John J. (m. Caroline Mastin). His father died when he was young and was raised & educated by his mother, step-fathers & uncles. John fought in the War of 1812, rising to the rank of captain. After the war he returned to St.Louis where he became an assistant to his uncle, William Clark, who was Indian Agent there. He later contracted to the U.S. Army, furnishing supplies and re-invested his growing fortune into promoting railroad ventures. He died at his home in St.Louis on 17 December, 1865. -"http://users.usinternet.com/dfnels/ofallon.htm

- Colonel John R. O’Fallon (1791-1865)- A descendant of a long line of Irish kings on one side and the exploring Clarks on the other, he was a much-loved benefactor. After winning his military title in the War of 1812, he settled in St. Louis and became an excellent businessman. Athlone Farm, now O’Fallon Park, was his country estate. He donated land in midtown St. Louis for St. Louis University, built Pope Medical College, which became Washington University Medical School and O’Fallon Poly Tech, which became part of Washington University. The monument on the center of this lot, the largest in the cemetery, is the work of George I. Barnett. -Narrative from the Bellefontaine Tour Guide - http://civilwartraveler.bravepages.com/BC/BellePan27.htm
- In the United States James O'Fallon (1749-1794) fought in the American War of Independence and was the founder of the Anti-British Society. His son Col. John O'Fallon (1791-1865) was a noted philanthropist while another son Benjamin O'Fallon (1793-1842) became known as the "Father of the Tribes" as he established friendly relation with the native Americans.-http://www.geocities.com/booksaliveo/f/fallon/fallon.htm
- 513. O'Fallon, John, 1791-1865. Papers, 1809-1850. A\O31. .33 cu. ft. Soldier from Ky. and St. Louis, Mo., businessman. The papers primarily consist of O'Fallon's letters to his half brother Charles W. Thruston of Louisville, but also include letters written to O'Fallon by various persons. The letters deal with O'Fallon's business affairs; the various branches of the family, particularly the Clarks and Thrustons, including William Clark and Meriwether Lewis Clark; allusions to contemporary events; the fur trade and expeditions regarding it; Osage Indian trade; and reminiscences of the officers and battles of the War of 1812, particularly the battles of Tippecanoe and the Thames. Prominent correspondents include Henry Atkinson, Robert Campbell, John Croghan, Benjamin Harrison, William Henry Harrison, Lawrence Taliaferro, Charles S. Todd, and Robert S. Todd.-http://www.filsonhistorical.org/guide6.html
- "John O'Fallon was a good example of a new, rising breed of army sutler—the gentleman trader. He came from a good family with impeccable political and social connections, and he had acquired a good education. Before he entered suttling his excellent personal reputation was enhanced by a distinguished military record...in 1810 he was pressed by his friends to enter the army. More than likely he received encouragement from major Croghan (father of Colonel George Croghan), a close family friend. O'Fallon entered the army during the early days of the War of 1812, and was assigned to General Harrison's army at Vincennes, Indiana. By March 1814 he had been promoted to captain of the Second US Rifle Regiment, a unit he commanded as of May 1815. At the close of the war, he was in charge of Fort Malden, in Canada, opposite the mouth of the Detroit River.10 Congress trimmed the army when the war was over. O'Fallon discharged a lot of his men and feared that he would lose his command, so he wrote influential men, including a number of congressmen, for an appointment as U.S. Indian agent or a U.S. government factor at the new military post near Green Bay. he simply said that he was captain of a rifle regiment, but too poor to go back home. As it turned out, O'Fallon was one of four captains selected to be retained in the army, but he nonethelessresigned his commission on July 31, 18118, and returned to St. Louis. A month later he was on his way up the Missouri River, following a portion of the trace that his uncle, William Clark, had taken fourteen years earlier. instead of pushing against the current as an explorer for the president, John O'Fallon was sutler to a segment of a large army expedition.O'Fallon had teamed up with the sutler at Bellefontaine, an old friend and ex-army captain named Lewis Bissell, who had served from 1808 to 1816." - more at Peddlers and Post Traders: The Army Sutler on the Frontier By David Michael Delo, 1998pp. 35-37

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Captain Thomas A. Patterson (VA) - original US Regiment of Riflemen - 1st Rifle Regiment
Second Lt 1st Rifle 12 Dec 1808 : First Lt Jan 1810 ; regimental Paymaster 6 July 1812 : Captain Aug 1812: died July 1814

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Captain John Ragan (MD) - original US Regiment of Riflemen
Captain 1st rifle 3 May 1808: resigned 1 June 1811. Lt colonel commanding 1st regiment Baltimore Militia in Stansbury's brigade 20 July 1814 to 10 Jan. 1815 : in battle of Bladensburg, his horse being shot, he was made prisoner.
"At this period [November, 1809], neither local prejudices, nor adverse habits, nor individual hardships, had generated the embryo of personal faction in the corps; harmony and fraternal respect, marked the intercourse of the officers; they appeared to make a common stock, of their privations, and sufferings, and, with honest cheer, mingled ntheir consolations and comforts. That I left the detachment, at the cantonment, near Washington, in this temper, let my valedictory order, of the 19th December, attest; and if my impressions at the moment, be unworthy consideration, the deposition of Captain Ragan, is conclusive, as to the professional, and personal feelings of the officers. He has informed you, gentlemen, that, a day or two, after I placed General Hampton in command, "the officers of the cantonment, agreed to give me a public dinner, as a demonstration of their friendship, and approbation of my conduct; that he carried about a subscription paper, which was signed by all the officers except two or three ; a meeting was held, and a committee of arrangement appointed, but why the dinner was not given, he could never learn." The subscription paper is attached to his deposition, and from it I record the following names, several of whom, since my absence, have become the distinguished protegees, of General Hampton, and, to the destruction of the fundamental principles of subordination, my vociferous slanderers." p. 517
Memoirs of my own times,Vol II, by James Wilkinson,printed by Abraham Small., 1816
http://books.google.com/books?id=_U4FAAAAYAAJ&printsec=frontcover
"The August 24, 1810, edition of the Democratic Clarion and Tennessee Gazette, Nashville, Tennessee, reported this news item: "By a gentleman from Muscle Shoals we have learned that Captain James McDonald's and Captain John Regan's[Ragan] companies [both Rifle Regiment]  had arrived at the Rifle Company[?] a few miles from the mouth of Elk River, from the cantonment [Cantonment Washington] near Natchez. They were at present from the command of Major John Fuller[Rifle Regiment]; but Coloenel Purdy from Hiwassee was expected there in a few days...The object for assembling soldiers is conjectured to be twofold: first to remove intruders on the Indian lands, and secondly to open a road to the Tombigbee...To effect the first object, Lieutenant Thomas Ramsey[Rifle Regiment]  has left notices at several public places among the settlers requiring them to move off the land by the 15th of December next, otherwise the military were ordered to drive them off at the point of the bayonet..." p.220
A Walk Through the Past - People and Places of Florence and Lauderdale, by William Lindsey McDonald, 1997, Heart of Dixie Publishing, 2003, p. 220
http://books.google.com/books?id=HXPa7_F5c1cC&lpg=PA220

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Captain Thomas Ramsey (OH) - 1st Rifle Regiment - postwar Rifle Regiment
wounded in Brown's sortie from Ft Erie: retained, Dec. 1818, in Rifle.: killed in dual with Captain Wyly Martin, Rifle regiment 6 Aug. 1818.
"The August 24, 1810, edition of the Democratic Clarion and Tennessee Gazette, Nashville, Tennessee, reported this news item: "By a gentleman from Muscle Shoals we have learned that Captain James McDonald's and Captain John Regan's[Ragan] companies [both Rifle Regiment]  had arrived at the Rifle Company[?] a few miles from the mouth of Elk River, from the cantonment [Cantonment Washington] near Natchez. They were at present from the command of Major John Fuller[Rifle Regiment]; but Coloenel Purdy from Hiwassee was expected there in a few days...The object for assembling soldiers is conjectured to be twofold: first to remove intruders on the Indian lands, and secondly to open a road to the Tombigbee...To effect the first object, Lieutenant Thomas Ramsey[Rifle Regiment]  has left notices at several public places among the settlers requiring them to move off the land by the 15th of December next, otherwise the military were ordered to drive them off at the point of the bayonet..." p.220
A Walk Through the Past - People and Places of Florence and Lauderdale, by William Lindsey McDonald, 1997, Heart of Dixie Publishing, 2003, p. 220
http://books.google.com/books?id=HXPa7_F5c1cC&lpg=PA220
"Sometime in early June 1813, Captain Thomas Ramsey and his detachment of United States Riflemen recruits were ordered to leave Fort Russell in the Illinois Territory and report to Portage de Sioux, Missouri Territory. Upon their arrival General Howard transferred his recruits to Starks and Clemson’s companies of the 1st U. States and sent Ramsey packing to Cincinnati to start all over.[73] In early June, the garrison at Fort Madison consisted of 42 men and the 44 new ex-riflemen recruits swelled the company to over 80 men. By July of 1813, 30% of the men were natives of Pennsylvania, 17% were from Virginia and 14% were born in Ireland, the third highest birth group and the highest of the foreign born. The Fort Madison garrison boasted a diverse birth group with other soldiers from Connecticut, Indiana Territory, Kentucky, Maryland, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, Upper Louisiana Territory, Canada, England, Prussia and Poland.[74]" - http://www.napoleon-series.org/military/Warof1812/2006/Issue4/c_fortmadison.html
"In the following year, in August, 1818, Captains Martin and Ramsay, both of the First United States Rifles, fought another duel on Bloody Island, and at which Captain Ramsay received a mortal wound of which he shortly afterward died."p. 79
A History of Missouri from the Earliest Explorations and Settlements, Volume 3...,by Louis Houck,  R. R. Donnelley & sons company, 1908
http://books.google.com/books?id=nmcOAAAAIAAJ&printsec=frontcover
"[Bloody Island ]...two U.S. Army officers, Captain Thomas Ramsey and Captain [wyly] Martin (the Gazette did not furnish his first name), made their was to its confines.  Both men wre stationed at the cantonment, Bellefontaine , on the Missouri River.  The nature of their quarrel was not known nor were the names of seconds or surgeons.  on what was believed to be the first fire, Ramsey was struck by a muzzle ball; he died a few days later. He was buried with full military honors as well as Masonic honors.  The Gazette on August 7 regretted his death, claiming his "character as an officer and a gentleman" made him stand tall in the annals of heroes who gave up the comforts of civilian life "to breast the storm of savage warfare, or the more savage British" in the recent war.  Although military regulations called for Martin to be court-martialed, he "retained his command and was soon head of a cantonment on the Missouri river...."p. 37

Duels and the roots of violence in Missouri, by Dick Steward, University of Missouri Press, 2000
http://books.google.com/books?id=-EafIWg52d0C&printsec=frontcover
Territorial Masonry: The Story of Freemasonry and the Louisiana Purchase, by Ray V. Denslow,Kessinger Publishing, 1995, Martin-Ramsey duel pp. 80-81
http://books.google.com/books?id=aD4LNmzEw9IC&printsec=frontcover

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 

Captain Fielder Ridgeway (MD) - original US Regiment of Riflemen - 1st Rifle Regiment
First Lt Rifle. 3 May 1808 : Capt July 1810: "struck off" 11 May 1814

"A loyal army man could not be proud of Captain Fielder Ridgeway of the riflemen.  His glib tongue served him well as a recruiter....." Patrick, p. 161

"A shortage of capable officers added to Smith's difficulties. He was furious with Captain Ridgeway, who was (deservedly, in Smith's opinion) arraigned on charges of perjury, cowardice," and many other crimes that degrade the officer and the gentlemen."  For want of an alternative, Smith had to put Ridgeway in charge at Point Peter but planned to transfer him to some other command.  Lieutenant Stallings, in whom Smith had greater trust, was stationed at Fernandina with instructions to come south if he received orders from Washington" p. 160

"...Ridgeway as the new commandant in Fernandina...proved a bad mistake...Ridgeway had a long record of drunkeness and court-martial as was already in Smith's bad graces because of it.  He was also an early and avowed partisan of of General Matthews and the Patriots and a man ready to rule with an iron fist.  Under his command, "the inhabitants of Fernandina were considered prisoners of war and remained so....the outcry against Ridgeway soon prompted Smith to remove him. Indeed, having no confidence in the officer, he had intended the appointment "to be of short duration."  In August, he substituted Captain Abraham Massias into the command and recalled Ridgeway to Fort Mose.  Despite the change, anger over the American occupation continued to smolder on Amelia Island.  Massias was regarded as a hard but just man by some and as little better than Ridgeway by others.  The task of governing Fernadina suited him, however, for campaigning in Florida had broken his health, and he was no longer able to remain active on the front lines. He showed no sympathy towards the Spanish loyalists, yet he did reinstitute many Spanish laws and regulations in order to maintain order and to clamp down on the smuggling trade....." pp. 203-204

"The inefficiency of the supply lines and the crass indifference of the War Department to his detachment's predicaments troubled Smith deeply.  Despite this, American forces did manage to entrench themselves in several new outposts.  Smith hopes, with support from Georgia, to break out of stalemate and initiate action...."p. 211

Capt Ridgeway wrote his brother: "Our Supplies as to Hospital Supplies and provisions are bad.  We are now become sickly.  Our aim is at Fort St. Augustine.  Five times the force we have will not be able to take it by storm...We musr hem them in and starve them out but even our present force will not do that, for the Spanish have the Indians to Sculp[sic] us when they can find us."p. 222

see Chapter 6 in Florida Fiasco: Rampant Rebels on the Georgia-Florida Border, 1810-1815, by Rembert W. Patrick, 1954, University of Georgia Press, 2010
http://books.google.com/books?id=JWc3cvE0Kk0C&printsec=frontcover
The Other War of 1812: The Patriot War and the American Invasion of Spanish, by James G. Cusick, 2007
http://books.google.com/books?id=BxHE3OsgU9EC&printsec=frontcover
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 

Captain Bennet Riley (MD) - 1st Rifle Regiment - postwar Rifle Regiment
Ens Rifle. 19 Jan. 1813 and Third Lt Mar 1813: Second Lt 1st Rifle Apr 1814: retained, May 1815, in Rifle: First Lt Mar. 1817: Captain Aug. 1818: in 5th infy May 1821: transferred Oct. 1821. to 6th infy: distinguished in engagement under Colo Leavenworth with Ariekaree Indians. Aug. 1823: brevet Major ten years faithfl service 6 Aug. 1828: in Black Hawk's war: Major 4th infy 26 Sept 1837 :Lt Colonel 2nd infy 1 Dec 1837 :brevet Colonel, to rank from "the day on which was fought the battle of Chokachatta Flo, in which. he particularly distinguished himself by bravery and good conduct and for long meritorious, and gallant service." 2 June 1840 (Feb 1844): comding 2nd infy in campaign of MGeneral Scott; and commanding brigade of 2nd and 7th infy in Valley of Mexico: bvt Brig. General "for gallantry and meritorious conduct, in battie of Cerro Gordo" 18 Apr 1847 (Aug 48): bvt Major General" for gallant conduct at Contreras, 20 Aug 1847 (Mar 1851) Commanding military department of upper California, and ex officio provincial Governor 1849, 1850: Colonel 1st infy 31 Jan. 1850
Inspector general Colonel Arthur Perenneau Hayne described him as "Subordinate, enterprising, active & brave" - Report of Inspection of the Ninth Military Department, 1819 - L. B. S. The Mississippi Valley Historical Review, Vol. 7, No. 3 (Dec., 1920), pp. 261-274 - doi:10.2307/1891224 This article consists of 14 page(s)
 - "...Not far from this public monument on a gentle shaded slope is the grave of General Bennet Riley who was a soldier in the War of 1812 and was distinguished in the Seminole War and the contest with Mexico. Over it is a handsome marble monument bearing a brief inscription.6 Near this in the cool shadows of the trees we...fn-6 The following is the inscription: "Major General Bennet Riley,United States Army. Died June 0,1S53,in the sixty-sixth year of his age."
General Riley was a native of Maryland, and entered the army as ensign in a rifle corps in January, 1S13. He 
mained in the army, and in 1828 was breveted a major for ten years' faithful service. He was breveted a Colonel for good conduct in Florida, brigadier general for his bravery at Cerro Gordo, and major general for his gallant conduct at Contreras. He was made military commander of the Department of Upper California, and was ex officio governor in 1849 and 1850. " pp. 848-849
- The pictorial field-book of the war of 1812 by Benson John Lossing, 1868

- "We were employed during the l0th and 21st in reorganizing our corps and arming our men, who had been disarmed by our aquatic misfortunes. This was effected by borrowing ten rifles of the Missouri Fur Company and organizing a small corps of artillery. We gave their arms to other men. The number of our companies was reduced from six to five and one of those armed with rifles, by using our surplus rifles, which were brought for the purpose of hunting and those we borrowed as above mentioned. We also borrowed twenty or thirty rifles from Genl. Ashley, but had occasion to use but few of them. The rifle company was placed under the command of Capt. Riley....We formed our line as follows: Genl. Ashley with his two Companies on the right, and his right resting upon the Missouri river. Next the five Companies of the 6th Rt. commanded by Bt. Major Ketchum with Capt. Armstrong's Light Company on the right and Capt. Riley's Company acting as Riflemen on the left....Capt. Riley was sent with his Company to engage the enemy and keep them in their towns. This he performed very handsomely....Arrangements were made to commence the attack early on the morning of the tenth. Capt. Riley and Lt. Bradly with their Companies were ordered to take possession of a hill near the Upper Village. This was promptly done and well done. Capt. Riley took a position with his command within 100 yards of the village, but in such manner as to secure his men from the fire of the enemy while at the same time he had completely the command of the village...." Colonel Henry Leavenworth's, 6th Reg, Report - Official Correspondence pertaining to the Leavenworth Expedition of 1823 into Sout Dakota - For the Conquest of the Ree Indians with Explanatory Notes by Doane Robinson, SOUTH DAKOTA HISTORICAL COLLECTIONS, pp.210-216. (More below.)
- see "This Excellent & Gallant Rifle Corps; The Model 1803 Harpers Ferry in Service." from Man at Arms, Vol. 3, No.4, July/August 1981. by Dr. Wayne R. Austerman (Historian, U.S. Army Medical Department Center and School, Fort Sam Houston, TX.) This is a rare gem that includes vivid combat and post-war exploits of the Rifles - including the exploits of Bennett Riley. As Austerman comments on the abolishment in 1821 of the Rifle Regiment "It was a curiously illogical decision, for the specially trained and superbly armed riflemen would have been the ideal unit for infantry service on the Indian frontier. Unfortunately Congress preferred the clumsy, but cheaper, line units, and even then eliminated one regiment..." Riley's own testimony supported this line of thinking. In Riley, and his rifle inspired tactics against the Arikaras, Kiowa, and Comanches, Austerman provides a compelling example - elaborated on by Utley and like-minded western historians.
-"It is my opinion that we could be of more use to the service if we were on the frontier of Missouri or Arkansas. There we could be a check on the Indians; for if we do not establish a line of posts around that frontier soon, the enormous body of Indians which the government is sending among you will become dissatisfied, and will rise and use you up before we can help you...the sooner it is done, the less it will cost the government, and the less blood will be spilt." "...two wars have shown us that riflemen are the most efficient troops that ever were employed in our country. Where can you find troops more efficient than...Forsyth's riflemen of the last war with Great Britain? I served with Forsyth's riflemen during the whole of the late war, up to the reduction of the army in 1821, and I have been in the infantry since..." - Riley to Senator Lewis F. Linn Missouri, Camp Sabine, August 28, 1837
"Riley street, close by, running from Main to Fillmore, preserves the name of this veteran of many wars. On one occasion the Common Council, true to its habitual fondness for changing street names, proposed to substitute something else for "Riley street." After it had been explained that the street bore the name of one of Buffalo's most distinguished men—perhaps the most distinguished soldier, who has made Buffalo his home—the name was, happily, allowed to remain on the map. Fort Riley, Kansas, formerly Fort Centre, was also named for him. Bennet Riley was born in Maryland in 1787; entered the United States Army as ensign of rifles in 1813, and was promoted to a third lieutenancy the same year. In 1814 he was made second lieutenant; and at the reduction of the army, which took place at the close of the war with Great Britain, he was retained as lieutenant in what was styled the Rifle Regiment. During the War of 1812 he had distinguished himself and won the approbation of his commanding officers. "The St. Lawrence frontier," says a biography of him published at the time of his death, "was the scene of his early military exploits; and the parties of British and Indians from over the lines from La Colic Mills to Lake Champlain, soon came to dread the murderous rifles of the parties commanded by Lieutenant Riley." He became a first lieutenant in 1817, a captain in 1818. The Rifle Regiment had been stationed on the western and northwestern frontiers since the War of 1812, and Captain Riley, in a great variety of situations, steadily added to his reputation as a cool-headed, vigorous, ever-ready soldier...." - SOUVENIRS OF MAJOR GENERAL BENNET RILEY, Buffalo Historical Society, 1921. pp 150-158.

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 

Captain Joseph Selden (VA) - Major 3rd Rifle Regiment - postwar Rifle Regiment
Captain 2d Light dragoons 12 Mar 1812 : Major 3rd Rifle 21 Feb 1814 : brevet Lt colonel for distinguished service 1 May 1815: retained, May 1815, Captain Rifle, with the brevet: transferred. May 1820, to Arty: resigned 13 May 1820. [U. S. Judge, in Ark ter. 13 May '20.]
"Major Joseph Selden commanded some rifle regiment detachments from Baton Rouge and Natchitoches and traveled up the Mississippi en route to Belle Fontaine by keelboat.Major Bradford met Major Selden near the mouth of the Ohio River and gave him his orders. After filling up his company to full strength, Bradford continued toward Arkansas, Selden continued to Belle Fontaine." - http://www.nps.gov/fosm/forteachers/upload/legacy%20part%202.pdf
- Bradford was to proceed down the Mississippi to meet his core of veterans coming up from Louisiana under the wing of Selden, the fifty- nine-year-old veteran of the revolutionary war and the War of 1812." - FN- Jackson wrote to William H. Crawford, secretary of war, urging an early decision in the William Bradford-Joseph Selden dispute. - A Stranger And a Sojourner: Peter Caulder, Free Black Frontiersman...Billy D. Higgins. p 291
Born in Henrico County, Va., May 7, 1787. Major in the U.S. Army during the War of 1812; justice of Arkansas territorial supreme court, 1820-24; died in office 1824. Killed in a duel with Andrew Scott, on an island in the Mississippi River, near Helena, Phillips County, Ark., May 26, 1824. Burial location unknown. - http://politicalgraveyard.com/bio/selden.html - "In the early part of 1824 two Superior Court Judges, Andrew Scott and Joseph Selden, found themselves in heated disagreement on a regular basis. Things went from bad to worse, at which time the two jurists decided to settle their differences. They did not go to court, however; they crossed the territorial boundary into Tennessee and settled their dispute at ten paces. Judge Scott was never bothered by Judge Selden again, although friends of the late Judge Selden blocked Senate confirmation of Scott's reappointment to the bench later that year. However, according to the histories available, Judge Scott served the bench again from 1827 to 1829." - http://www.firstjudcirar.org/history_of_circuit.htm
Some time in 1820, Judges Robert P. Letcher and Charles Jonett resigned from the Superior Court bench, and Benjamin Johnson, of Kentucky, and Joseph Selden, of Virginia, formerly an officer in the United States Army, were appointed their successors. Soon after Judge Selden went upon the bench he and Judge Andrew Scott, also of the Superior Court, and two ladies, became engaged in a social game of whist at the residence of one of the ladies at the Post of Arkansas. In the course of the game one of the ladies, Judge Scott's partner in the game, remarked: "Judge Selden, we have the tricks and the honors on you." To which Judge Selden very abruptly replied: "That is not so, madam." The lady, very much mortified at the ungracious reply, put up her handkerchief to hide her mortification, saying, "I did not expect to be insulted." Judge Scott remarked to Judge Selden : "Sir, you have insulted a lady, and my partner, and you must apologize for your rudeness." Judge Selden declined to apologize, saying: "I make no apology. She has stated what is not true." Judge Scott seized a candlestick, which was standing on the card table, and hurled it at Judge Selden. Parties who were present interfered, and prevented further difficulty at the time. A few days after the occurrence, Judge Selden sent, by the hands- of Judge Scott, an apology to the lady, which was accepted, and the matter was thought to have been amicably settled. But the intermeddling of pretended friends, who were industrious in bearing tales to Judges Scott and Selden, succeeded in reviving the quarrel, which resulted in Judge Scott sending Judge Selden a challenge to fight a duel. The meeting took place on Mississippi soil, opposite Montgomery's Point, at the mouth of White river. The second and surgeon of Judge Scott was Dr. Nimrod Menifee. Judge Selden's second was Robert C. Oden, though some accounts say it was James Woodson Bates. The weapons were pistols, and the distance ten paces. At the first shot Judge Selden was killed. Judge Andrew Scott was the most chivalrous and the purest-minded man, I think, I ever knew. He would not brook to listen to the faintest breath of scandal against the female sex, and his tender regard for the reputation of women was one of which any man might justly feel proud, but of which so few can boast. He was a man "sans peur et sans reproche."pp. 33-37 - Early Days in Arkansas by Willam F Pope, 1895
http://books.google.com/books?id=i3IOAAAAIAAJ&printsec=frontcover

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 

Captain Edmund Shipp Jr. (KY) - 2nd Rifle Regiment - postwar Rifle Regiment
Ensign 17th infy 8 May 1812: Second Lt Mar 1813: distinsguished under Croghan, in defence of Ft Stenhenson Aug 1813: distinsguished in defence of Ft Meigs May 1813: Brigade major to BGen McArthur : First Lt 2nd Rifle Маг 1814 : Captain May 1814 : retained. May 1815, in Rifle : died 22 Apr. 1817 at Belle Fontaine : received, by Resolution of Congress of 13 Feb 1835, (by his nearest male representative) the testimonial of a sword for being engaged in that defence of Ft Stephenson.
"Died at Belle Fontaine capt Edmund Shipp of the rifle regiment a valuable and much esteemed officer" NILES' - FROM MARCH TO SEPTEMBER 1817 VOL XII
http://books.google.com/books?id=m3sFAAAAQAAJ&printsec=frontcover 


-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Captain Thomas F Smith (KY) - 1st Rifle Regiment - postwar Rifle Regiment
Ensign Rifle. 2 July and Third Lt Nov 1813: Second Lt 1. Rifle. May 1814: distinguished under Maj. Appling at Stony Creek, and distinguished under Maj. L. Morgan at Seajoeada [CONJOCTA] Creek : retained, Dec. 1815, in Rifle, : First Lt Apr. 1817 : Capt Apr. 1819 : in 1st infy May 1821 : in Black Hawk's war: brevet Major ten years. faithful service 25 Apr. 1829 : resigned 30 Oct, 1837.
Inspector general Colonel Arthur Perenneau Hayne described him as "An intelligent, active & i valuable Officer" -Report of Inspection of the Ninth Military Department, 1819 - L. B. S. The Mississippi Valley Historical Review, Vol. 7, No. 3 (Dec., 1920), pp. 261-274 - doi:10.2307/1891224 This article consists of 14 page(s).

MAJOR THOS. FLOYD SMITH, U. S. A.,
was a native of Kentucky and served in the Rifle Corps.
On November 24, 1825, he was married to Maria Antoinette Emily, the third daughter of Col. Augustus Chouteau, who was born on April 14, 1802, and died June 5, 1842, at the age of 40 years, and her husband, Major Smith, in December, 1843, eighteen months after his wife.
Their surviving children are:
Louis Chouteau Smith, born in 1827, married in 1853. .
Thomas Floyd Smith, born Sept. 30, 1831, married.
Philomena, born N ov’r 24, 1836, married to Major Charles F. Larned, Paymas. U. S. Army, now deceased.
Annals of St. Louis in Its Territorial Days, from 1804 to 1821: By Frederic Louis Billon
http://books.google.com/books?id=knlQAQAAIAAJ&pg=PA310#v=onepage&q&f=false

Thomas Floyd Smith
http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=stevensp&id=I03479
Thomas Floyd SMITH Major USA was born in 1784 in Jefferson Co, , KY. He died in Dec 1844 or 1843, St Louis, St Louis Co, MO.
He was married to Emilie Antoinette CHOUTEAU on 24 Nov 1825 in St Louis King Fr, St Louis, St Louis Co, MO. Children were: Louis Aloysius SMITH , Louis Chouteau SMITH, Mary SMITH, Thomas Floyd SMITH Jr., Philomena Sympharosa SMITH, Azzelda SMITH. (ed.: See footnote at his name for source.)
Kathleen Jennings, op. cit., notes that he " was an ensign of rifles in 1813 after serving as a second lieutenant in 1812, but he particularly distinguished himself in the Indian Wars. He was adjutant to Gen. E. P. Gaines and led the storming party in attack at Ft. Erie. He was breveted major and retired from the army in 1837, living in St. Louis, where he died in 1843. Major Smith married Emilie Chouteau, a Creole, and one of the daughters of Col. Auguste Chouteau, surveyor of Louisiana, who as a youth of 14, landed at the site of the present city of St. Louis, in charge of the first party of colonists. Col. Chouteau, who superintended the building of the first house in St. Louis, owned an enormous tract of land in the heart of the city at his death, part of which was presented to St. Louis as a park by his grandson, Capt. Thomas Floyd Smith."
Louisville's First Families -A SERIES OF GENEALOGICAL SKETCHES by KATHLEEN JENNINGS
Published by THE STANDARD PRINTING CO.- Louisville, KY 1920
http://www.kygenweb.net/history/ff_louisville/c14.htm
"In the possession of Thomas Floyd Smith are a number of papers which belonged to his grandfather, Major Smith. One of these is a letter written October 11, 1839, by Gen. Edward Pendleton Gaines, to Major and Mrs. Smith, "respectfully requesting them to accept a portrait of Edward Pendleton Gaines as a slender token of friendship and in remembrance of unceasing admiration, cherished for twenty-five years, of repeated acts of gallantry by which the then Lieut. Smith, of the First Rifle Regiment, signalized himself and did honor to his corps and his country's service in the defense of Ft. Erie— surpassed by none in the heroic enterprise, displaying the untiring chivalry of a true-hearted patriot."
   Another letter, beginning "Dear Capt.," was written by Gen. Zachary Taylor at Louisville on January 4. 1824, to Major Smith, dealing with Indian wars, with the political situation and of Major Smith being detailed to command a rendezvous to be established at St. Louis or Belle Fontaine."

Creoles of St. Louis  Chouteau family (René Auguste Chouteau, fl. 1749); by  Beckwith, Paul Edmond, 1848-1907,Creoles Publisher: St. Louis : Nixon-Jones Printing Co. 1893) Thomas Floyd Smith "He was born in Fincastle Count} 7 , Va., 1784, and died near St. Louis, Dec. 1843. Major Smith was appointed ensign of Rifles in 1813, 3rd Lieut, in 1813, 2d Lieut, in 1814. He particularly distinguished himself in the Indian wars, and at the engagements of Stone} 7 and Seconda Creeks. He was adjutant to General Gaines, and led the storming party in the attack on Fort Erie, participating in the night attack on the English flotilla. He was promoted captain in 1819, and was transferred to the first regiment of infantry in 1821. He served in the Black Hawk war, and was breveted major for ten years' faithful service. He resigned from the army Oct. 30, 1837, returning to St. Louis. His father, Thomas Smith, was born in Virginia, and killed in 1786 by the Indians at the storming of Brashears Fort, near Bear Grass Creek, Ky. He married Abigail, daughter of William and Abigail Davis Floyd, sister of Col. John Floyd, the pioneer statesman and soldier of Kentucky." pp. 43-44
http://archive.org/details/creolesofstlouis00beck

"Beechmore"
Great-Aunt Sally Tyler’s Home in “The Little Colonel”
Real Life Home of Captain Thomas Floyd and Blanch Weissinger Smith,
Hattie Cochran’s (The Little Colonel’s) Great Aunt and Uncle
http://www.littlecolonel.com/places/peweevalley/beechmore.htm

Though Silent They Speak: The Larned Family History
http://books.google.com/books?id=PE_NBAjpnEIC&lpg=PP1&pg=PA127#v=onepage&q&f=false

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Captain William Smyth (vice Smith)( NC) - original US Regiment of Riflemen - 1st Rifle Regiment
Second Lt Rifle 27 Jan 1809 : First Lt July 1810 : Capt Rifle Jan. 1813 : wounded at the capture of York Upper Canada by explosion of Magazine 27 Apr 1813 {with Pike and Forsyth] : disbanded June 1815.
-Richard Brannum/Branham- born about 1789 (per his Military discharge) in Stokes Co., NC - Richard signed up 11 Jan. 1809 for five years in the military. He served under Capt. Benjamin Forsythe and Capt.  Wm. Smyth in a rifle regiment, and was honorably discharged on the 13th day of Jan. 1814.
"Fort Hampton was built about 1810 approximately four miles from the mouth of Elk River.  this was more of a garrison than a fort in that its mission was to keep the settlers out and not to fight the Indians.  A Captain Smythe [Rifle Regiment] ] was its first commanding officer. "p.220
A Walk Through the Past - People and Places of Florence and Lauderdale, by William Lindsey McDonald, 1997, Heart of Dixie Publishing, 2003, p. 220
http://books.google.com/books?id=HXPa7_F5c1cC&lpg=PA220


---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Captain Thomas Spencer (GA)
First lt Rifle 3 May 08, Capt Jan 10, died in Aug 1812

Captain Elias Stallings (GA) - original U.S. Regiment of Riflemen - 1st Rifle Regiment

Ens Rifle 3 May 08 Sec Lt May 09 Fst Lt Mar 11 Capt Rifle Nov 13 disbanded June 15
see Chapter 6 in Florida Fiasco: Rampant Rebels on the Georgia-Florida Border, 1810-1815, by Rembert W. Patrick, 1954, University of Georgia Press, 2010
http://books.google.com/books?id=JWc3cvE0Kk0C&printsec=frontcover 
The Other War of 1812: The Patriot War and the American Invasion of Spanish, by James G. Cusick, 2007
http://books.google.com/books?id=BxHE3OsgU9EC&printsec=frontcover
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Captain Henry Van Swearingen (Indian territory) - 1st Rifle Regiment - postwar Rifle Regiment
Second Lt Rifle 15 May and First Lt July 1812 : wounded in capture of Ft George Upper Canada 27 May 1813 : Capt 1st Rifle. May 1814 : retained, May 1815, in Rifle—-declined 1816.

VAN SWERINGEN
Side-lights on Maryland history: with sketches of early Maryland families, by Hester Dorsey Richardson, 1913
http://books.google.com/books?id=l_oMAAAAYAAJ&printsec=frontcover&source=gbs_ge_summary_r&cad=0

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Captain Carey A. Trimble (OH) - postwar Rifle Regiment
First Lt 26th infy 20 May 1813 : transferred 1814, to 19th infy : Captain Aug 1814: retained May 1815, in Rifle — declined.

Captain Alexander S. Walker (VA) - original US Regiment of Riflemen
Capt Rifle 1 July 1808 : dismissed 1 Jan 1810

Captain Edward Wadsworth (OH) - 1st Rifle Regiment
"23 Dec 1814 McLeed's Hotel forwards letter from Elijah Wadsworth requesting that his son Edward Wadsworth be assigned recruting duty in Ohio while recovering from wounds...Letters received by the Adjutant General" - A Comprehensive Catalogue of the Correspondence and Papers of James Monroe

Captain Moses Whitney (MA) - original US Regiment of Riflemen
Captain Rifle 18 June 1808: resigned 1 July 1811.

-----------------------------------------FIRST LIEUTENANTS-----------------------------------

First Lieutenant  Dill Armor (Pen) - original Regiment of Riflemen
First lt Rifle. 18 June '08: died 16 Mar. 1811, at Carlisle Pa.
John Armour and Nancy Dill:
Marriage: Abt. 1784, Cumberland County, Pa.  
5 Children of John Armour and Nancy Dill :
v. Dill Armour, born Abt. 1789; died March 17, 1811 in Carlisle, Cumberland County, Pennsylvania.
More About Dill Armour:  Military service: January 18, 1808, Promoted to Lt. in the U.S. Riflemen
http://genforum.genealogy.com/armour/messages/365.html
relation to "Matthew Dill Colonel Fifth York County Battalion Penna Militia" - Sons of the American Revolution -  1927

First Lieutenant William Arnold (KY) - 1st Rifle Regiment
ARNOLD. WM. [Born in _ Appointed from Ky.]
2nd Lieut. 3rd Rifles 3 Dec. 1812[?] 1st Lieut. 1st Rifle Regt, 11 May, 1814.; distinguished under Major L. Morgan at Scajocada Creek; Disbanded 15 June. 1815. Re-Instated 2 Dec, 1815. In 8th Inf. Capt.. 5 Nov. 1817. Resigned 31 Oct., 1818.
(GENERAL) WILLIAM ARNOLD
http://www.tngenweb.org/madisonfiles/families/arnold2.htm
"..Son, William Arnold appears to have been born about 1790 to 1800, as estimated from the 1830 Census for Madison County, Tennessee (q.v.); Stephen F. Austin's "Register of Families" for the Austin Colony in Texas gives Arnold's age as 38 in 1833 (i.e., born about 1795)....War of 1812
The earliest records found to date for William Arnold appear during his service in the War of 1812.[3] (Below: an attempted transcription of a microfilm copy of a faint handwritten service summary).
'Arnold, William, 2nd Lieut., U.S. Rifles. Rgt. Commander Col. T.A. Smith. AGO Washington DC March 18th 1823 to be 2-Lieut. Dec. 3 1812 Order book 1813 to 1815 Malden. Oct 17 1813 attached to Capt. Hamilton's Co. — promoted Lieut. May 11 1814. MoRet (monthly return, i.e., muster) Sackett's Harbor June 30 1814. A.R. Oct 1814. Present order dated Ref Fall Nov-5-1814. Ordered to Knoxville, Tenn, on recruiting service. MoRet Columbia SC Mar 15, 1815, Absent at Columbia CH GA AR Columbia Apr 30 1815 Present. MoRet Chalk Hill, near Columbia SC Jun 30, 1815. Absent with leave at Frankfort, KY' 

Lieut. Wm. Arnold, of the 39th Regiment of Regulars, was sent to Kingston, TN, to recruit for the war (of 1812); one of his most distinguished recruits was private citizen Sam Houston (future Governor of Tennessee and Texas).[4] A lesser-known soldier also recruited by Lieut. Arnold in 1813 was Littleton Davis.[5]
Sam Houston enlisted in 1813. "Soon after this, Lieut. Arnold had received 39 soldiers, and was ordered to send them forth to join the troops, marching to the Creek War, under the command of Col. John Williams, of Knoxville, who commanded this regiment of regulars in person at the battle of Horse Shoe, and afterwards became a distinguished Senator in Congress from Tennessee."[6] Houston, serving under General Andrew Jackson, would be wounded twice at the Battle of Horseshoe Bend (near present day Alexander City, Alabama).
Brittain (1999), Roane County Tennessee Militia Companies, 1806-1820 & 1828-1839, p. 48, refers to "Captain Arnold's Co." Thus, Lt. Arnold advanced in rank while in East Tennessee....Knoxville Register, Vol. 4 #163, 7 September 1819: "Married on the 17th of August last in Roane County, Tennessee, Capt. William Arnold of Kentucky, to Miss Martha D. King of that County."[7]...
Elected Major General of Tennessee Militia (1826)...In 1827, Davy Crockett ran for Congress against Adam Rankin Alexander and Mjr. Gen. William Arnold, both then of Jackson (Madison Co., TN); Crockett won easily; see below. (Crockett at this time was a supporter of Andrew Jackson)....In 1833, William Arnold resigned his commission as Major-General of the Tennessee militia, and relocated to Texas (where, unfortunately, he promptly died!). Why would he migrate to Texas? Does this relate to the friendship with Sam Houston; see notes under "Roane County, Tennessee". William Arnold received a land grant of 1 league (4428 acres) in Austin's Colony in Brazoria County, recorded Apr. 15, 1833. This appears to be the General William Arnold of this narrative, who died shortly thereafter, probably during one of the cholera epidemics that occurred when the Brazos River flooded.[32] Lucas, Obituaries from Early Tenn. Newspapers, 1794-1851: "Arnold, Gen. William of Tennessee, died in Velasco, Texas" (from National Banner & Nashville Whig, Fri., Nov. 18, 1833).[33] The Knoxville Register (#889: 7-August-1833) tersely recorded "General William Arnold of Jackson in the Western District of this state, died lately in Texas....Postscript

William Arnold, soldier, lawyer, and would-be politician, died prematurely in Texas at age about 38. He had been well acquainted with the major pioneers and politicians of early Tennessee history. By marriage, he was connected to both General John Sevier and General James Robertson; of these famous Tennesseans, one gushing author wrote: "Under these two leaders, John Sevier and James Robertson, the people developed a boundless courage, a constant fortitude, a self-devoted patriotism, worthy of the most heroic ages."[40] Had General William Arnold not died in Texas a couple of years before the Texas Revolution, what role might he have played? Would he have served with his former recruit, General Sam Houston, or fought at the Alamo alongside his former political rival Col. David Crockett? It was not to be." 
First Lieutenant W. S Blair (KY) - William P. L. Blair - 2nd Rifle Regiment - postwar Rifle Regiment
Ensign 28th infy 20 May 1813: Third Lt 2nd Rifle Mar and Second Lt July 1814 : disbanded June 1816. Sec Lt Rifle 17 Feb and First Lt July 1817 : disbanded June 1821

First Lieutenant Horace Broughton (VT) - postwar Rifle Regiment
Second Lt 26th infy 21 Apr and First Lt Dec 1814: disbanded June 1815. Second Lt 6th infy 19 Feb 1817 : First Lt 31 July 1817 - listed on Rifle in register 1818 not on 181 corrected register: resigned 5 Apr 1818

First Lieutenant Daniel H. Campbell (KY) - postwar Rifle Regiment
Second Lt Rifle 18 Apr 1818: vice David 1819 Register - First Lt Apr 1819: resigned 2 Nov 1819 - not in 1820 Register

First Lieutenant Benjamin Champney (MA) - original Regiment of Riflemen
First Lt rifle 27 Oct 08; resd 1 Oct 10 (Heitmann) conflicts with Journal of the executive proceedings of the Senate of the United States of America, 1805-1815 "Second Lieutenant William Smith, to be promoted to First Lieutenant, vice Benjamin Champney promoted."p. 172

First Lieutenant John Clark (PA) - postwar Rifle Regiment
Ensign 22nd infy 29 July and Third Lt Oct 1813: resigned 18 June 1814. Second Lt Rifle Jan 1820. First Lt 12 July 1820. disbanded June 1821.

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 

First Lieutenant Gabriel Field (MO) - postwar Rifle Regiment
Second Lt Rifle 24 May 1817 : First Lt Apr 1818 : in 6th infy May 1821: resigned 16 Apr 1828.

Head Quarters 6th Inf
Fort Atkinson
Apr 17, 1823
Orders

It has become the painful duty of the Col Comdg to announce to his command that the gallant, active, and generous Lieut. Gabriel Field is no more.  he died last evening at ten o'clock in consequence of an accidental wound in the thigh with a sharp pointed knife by which the main artery and nerve were severed.
His funeral will be attended tomorrow at eleven o'clock A.M.
Major Ketchum's Company will form the escort.  The Adjutant will detail a sufficient number to complete the company in its establishment for this duty.
Major Foster being the second officer in command at this Post he will immediately secure all the effects or equipage which were of the late Lieut. Field (deceased) and make an inventory thereof, and as soon as possible transmit the same to the Officer of the Department of War.  All the publick property which may be found in or about his late quarters will be delivered to Lieut. Z.C. Palmer, Acting Post Quarter master for which proper receipts will be given.
At the request of Major Foster, Surgeon John Gale and Capt Gray will assist in the performance of this duty.

H. Leavenworth Col Comdg.


"Daily Life at Fort Atkinson on the Missouri 1820-27," by Colonel Virgil Ney, Military Review, 1977, Part 1 (Jan) and 2 (Feb), Part 1: pp. 36-48 Part 2: pp. 50-66http://usacac.army.mil/CAC2/MilitaryReview/mrpast2.asp


"Gabriel Field...He surveyed the area that now includes DeValls Bluff, Arkansas (Prairie County) in 1816."
State of Arkansas Historical Land Records - Surveyors of the Louisiana Purchase
http://www.cosl.org/history/surveyors.aspx
"(Ioway Chief Hard Heart) who spoke English, told Colonel Henry Atkinson, the commander of the military post established near the site of the original Council Bluff, about an old Indian trail to Chariton, Missouri. He showed Sgt.(?) Gabriel Field the trail, who marked it out, and the trail then became known as “Field’s Trace.” Fort Atkinson was in existence from 1820-1827.The reconstructed fort is now a Nebraska State Historical Park, with living history weekends on the first weekends of the month from Memorial Day through October.
Heart’s daughter Nicomi married Surgeon John Gale of Fort Atkinson. After Dr. Gale left the area when the fort closed in 1827, Nicomi married fur trader Peter Sarpy, who ran the American Fur Company post in Bellevue. Sarpy helped raise Nicomi’s daughter Mary Gale, who married Joseph La Flesche, Jr., the Chief of the Omaha Indians. Two of their children became the famous La Flesche sisters: Susette La Flesche Tibbles , the Indian Rights activitist who toured the U. S. and Europe with Ponca Chief Standing Bear; and Susan La Flesche Picotte, who became the first Native American woman medical doctor.  Several books have been written about the La Flesche sisters, but their famous great-grandfather, Hard Heart, has been lost to history." 
Ioway Chief Hard Heart’s Trading Posts in Omaha-Council Bluffs: A Lewis and Clark Day Trip
http://www.lewisandclarktravel.com/index.php/site/comments/ioway_chief_hard_hearts_trading_posts_tour_in_omaha_council_bluffs/

"An Indian trail or trace ran up Grand river for some distance. Long  says that it skirted the east side of this river and was sixty miles long. When he followed it in 1819, it was known as "Field's trace." At the upper end it connected with another trail running northwest, undoubtedly the continental trace or trail noted on De
Lisle's map, extending northwest through the plains at the headwaters of the Little Platte and the Nishnabotna in Missouri and the almost boundless plains of the upper Missouri to the Rocky mountains. Field's trace to the headwaters of Grand river was a favorite warpath followed by the Saukees, Foxes, and Pottowatomies into the Osage country." p. 229 - A history of Missouri from the earliest explorations and settlements until the admission of the state into the union, by Louis Houck, 1908
 http://www.archive.org/details/historyofmissour01houc

Field, Gabriel, Journal, 1819, (C1891)
1 folder(s)
"Journal of a trip from Camp Missouri to Chariton kept by Gabriel Field from October 31 to November 27, 1819, for Colonel H. Atkinson. Journal includes detailed directions and observations of the area. Two maps of route."
Western Historical Manuscript Coolection - Columbia (MO) - Travel & Description Collection Descriptions

"the troops settled down in temporary quarters at Camp  Missouri, Nebraska. It became imperative that land communications..."
“The Camp Missouri-Chariton Road, 1819: The Journal of Lt. Gabriel Field,” *Nichols, Roger L., ed., Bulletin of the Missouri Historical Society, 24. January, 1968, 139-52.

"[Atkinson's] actions at the Council Bluff was to order Lieutenant Gabriel Field to lay out a road from Camp Missouri to Chariton. ... During the following January and February, Captain James S. Gray with twenty- four men improved the road by..."
Navigating the Missouri: Steamboating on Nature's Highway, 1819-1935, by William E. Lass, Arthur H. Clark Co., 2008 

"Lt. Gabriel Field died at Fort Atkinson in 1823. NSHS archeologists identified his remains and commissioned a facial reconstruction based on cranial structure....“All of the research I (Gayle Carlson) have done seems to indicate that Lieutenant Field was well thought of by his fellow officers and was routinely assigned duties requiring intelligence and leadership abilities." Field’s military career, however, ended at an early age.  After suffering an accidental knife wound to the thigh on March 31, 1823, at Robidoux’s (Cabanne’s) trading post, he was returned to Fort Atkinson by boat. On April 12 his leg was amputated in a vain attempt to save his life. He died on April 16. Field’s death was announced to his fellow soldiers the next day....Field’s skeleton and the other human remains recovered by archeologists illustrate the hazards and brevity of life at Fort Atkinson. Poor dental health, diseases such as scurvy, and “pulmonic inflammations” were common at the post. Death resulted from fights among the soldiers, suicide, or accidental injury rather than from military engagements. In fact, the troops at the fort participated in almost no military operations with the exception of the brief Arikara War of 1823. More detailed information on the search for Gabriel Field is included in Karin S. Bruwelheide, Douglas W. Owsley, and Gayle F. Carlson’s “Military Burials at Cantonment Missouri, 1819-1820, and Fort Atkinson, 1820-1827, Nebraska” from Skeletal Biology and Bioarchaeology of the Northwestern Plains, published by the University of Utah Press in 2008." - "Gabriel Field—The Face of a Soldier," by Patricia C. Gaster, Nebraska History News, Volume 63, Number 1, January/February/March 2010

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

First Lieutenant Abraham Fine (TN) - 3rd Rifle Regiment - postwar Rifle Regiment
Ensign 24th infy 1 Oct 1813: Second Lt 3rd Rifle Mar and First Lt Sept 1814 : retained Dec 1815, in Rifle : resigned 1 Oct 1816

First Lieutenant John Findley (GA) - original US Regiment of Riflemen
Second Lt Rifle 15 May, and First Lt Apr 1812 : resigned 31 Dec. 1813

First Lieutenant John Gantt (KY) - postwar Rifle Regiment
Second Lt Rifle. 24 May 1817 : First Lt Apr 1818 : in 6th infy Captain Feb 1823: dismissed 12 May 1829.

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

First Lieutenant Abraham Hawkins (CT) - Rifle Company at the Battle of Tippecanoe
Lieut Abraham Hawkins a native of Connecticut was appointed in command of a company of riflemen in place of Capt Whitney He was made an ensign in the 4th Infantry June 18 1805 2nd lieutenant June 15 1809 1st lieutenant Aug 25 1811 captain Sept 2 1813 and honorably discharged June 15 1815 He was taken prisoner at the surrender of Detroit in 1812 A Journal of Two Campaigns of the Fourth Regiment of US Infantry in the Michigan and Indiana Territories under the Command of Col John P Boyd and Lieut Col James Miller During the Years i8ll and l8n by Adam Walker Keene NH 1816 Heitman's Reg and Dict of US Army
ORDERLY BOOK OF COL JOHN P BOYD AND EXTRACTS 1811-1812  
A Journal of Two Campaigns of the Fourth Regiment of US Infantry in the Michigan and Indiana Territories, ... by Adam Walker, Keene, NH, 1816
"Secretary of War to Congress War Department December 19 1811 Am Sta Pa Indian Affairs I 797 
"....On the information and representation of facts, therein contained, the 4th regiment of infantry, with one company of riflemen, under the command of Colonel [John P.] Boyd, were ordered from Pittsburg to Vincennes subject to the further orders of Governor Harrison, who was authorized, with this force and such additional number of companies from the militia as should be deemed necessary, to establish a new post on the Wabash, and to march against, and disperse, the armed combination under the Prophet.1
I have the honor to be, with great respect, sir, your most obedient servant, - W. EUSTIS" p. 674

"General Orders
Head Quarters, Vincennes, Sept. 20th 1811
It is the intention of the Commander-in-Chief to form the whole of the Troops into two lines, the first to be composed of all the U. S. Infantry, U. S. Riflemen and such of the Militia Corps as may be selected for the purpose...."p.584
My attention was there engaged by a heavy firing upon the left of the front line where were stationed the small Company of US Riflemen then however armed with muskets...."p. 623..."Of the several Corps the 4th US Regt and the two small Companies attached to it were certainly the most conspicuous for undaunted valour. The Companies commanded by Captain Cook Snelling and Barton Lieutenants Larabee Peters & Hawkins were placed in situations where they could render more service and encounter more danger and those officers eminently distinguished themselves..p.626..."The battle had now become general, every musket and rifle contributed its share to the work of carnage. A few Indians had placed themselves in an advantageous situation on the left of the front line and being screened from our fire by some large oak trees did great execution in our ranks. The small company of US Riflemen commanded by Lieut Hawkins were stationed within two rods of these trees and received the heaviest of their fire, but maintained the position in a most gallant manner, although the company of militia on their left were giving way in great disorder. Major Daviess, with a small detachment of dragoons attempted to dislodge them, but failed in the attempt and was himself mortally wounded. Capt Snelling of the regulars soon after made a desperate charge at the head of his company with success, losing one man who was tomahawked by a wounded Indian. The Indians fell back..."p.701... "Late Capt. Whitney's Riflemen. Under the command of Lieut. Abraham Hawkins.
Killed—Ira Browbridge. Wounded—Ensign Burchefted; Sergeant Reuben Newton; Sergeant Aaron W. Forbush; Adam Walker; Ebenezer T. Andrews; Wm. Brigham; Samuel Briggs; Eph. Hall; Edward R. Tuck; Israel Newhall; Samuel Thing. Total, 12."p. 709
William Henry Harrison, Governors messages and letters, Volume 1, Indiana. Governor, 1922.
http://books.google.com/books?id=KlFIAAAAYAAJ&printsec=frontcover

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------  

First Lieutenant Samuel V. Hamilton (VA) - original US Regiment of Riflemen - 1st Rifle Regiment - postwar Rifle Regiment
Ensign Rifle 4 Dec 1812: Third Lt Mar and Second Lt Nov 1813: Firs Lt 1st Rifle Sept 1814: retained, May 1815, in Rifle. : resigned 1 July 1817

First Lieutenant John Heddleson (OH?) - US Marine - 2nd Rifle Regiment - postwar Rifle Regiment
Third Lt 28th infy 20 May 1813: served as Lt of Marines on board the Niagara in Perry's victory, for which he received a silver medal: Second Lt 2nd Rifle Mar 1814 : Adjutant 1814: First Lt Sept 1814: retained, May 1815, in Rifle : resigned 31 Mar 1817

First Lieutenant John Hollingsworth (VA) - 3rd Rifle Regiment - postwar Rifle Regiment
Second Lt 3rd Rifle 26 Mar 1814: retained, May 1815, in Rifle : regimental Quartermaster First Lt Mar 1817 : resigned 31 July 1817

First Lieutenant Thomas W. Kavanagh (TN) - postwar Rifle Regiment
Second Lt Rifle 13 Feb. and First Lt Nov 1818 : died 29 May 1823

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

First Lieutenant Daniel Keith (VA) - postwar Rifle Regiment
Sergeant: Ensign 35th infy 14 July 1814: disbanded June 1815. Second Lt Rifle Feb 1819 : First Lt May 1820 : disbanded 1 June 1821
- see research of the KEITH family that lived in Dinwiddie Co in the late 1700s War of 1812: The Search for the old 35th US Infantry Regiment
"
" July 21. " From the Missouri Intelligencer.''
"Franklin, (Boonslick) July 2d, 1819.
"We announce with great satisfaction the arrival here, this day, of five large Keel Boats, with 260 troops, exclusive of officers, being a part of the expedition destined for the Yellow Stone. Our citizens were apprised of their approach by the firing of swivels from on board the boats, and every demonstration of joy and satisfaction was manifested at an event, the successful result of which, promises such important advantages, as well to this portion of the country as to the nation at large."
Colonel Talbott Chambers, Captain James S. Gray, Lieutenant Scott, Lieutenant Keith and Doctor Malone were the officers who came with the troops.
pp. 24-26
"YELLOWSTONE EXPEDITION,"NOTES OF THE EARLY HISTORY OF THE NEBRASKA COUNTRY, Publications - Nebraska State Historical Society, Volume 20, by Nebraska State Historical Society, 1922

http://books.google.com/books?id=MJ0UAAAAYAAJ&printsec=frontcover


-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

First Lieutenant Elias T. Langham (OH) - 2nd Rifle Regiment
Ensign 19th infy 12 Mar 1812 : Third Lt and Second Lt Apr 1813 : Firts Lt 2nd Rifle Mar 1814 : retained, May 1815, in Rifle declined.

First Lieutenant Louis Laval (SC) - postwar Rifle Regiment
Second Lt Light dragoons 1 May 1812: First Lt July 1813: retained, May 1815, in Rifle. : resigned 1 Mar 1817.

First Lieutenant Gideon Low (PA) - postwar Rifle Regiment
vice "Lowe" - Ensign Infy 1 June 1812 : Second Lt 22nd infy Apr 1813 : First Lt Feb 1814 : disbanded June 1815. Second Lt Rifle Feb 1819: First Lt Mar1820: Assistant commmisary subsistence Apr 1820 : Captain Aug 1828 : resigned 29 Feb 1840. Died at Ft Winnebago May 1850

First Lieutenant Thomas Martin (VA) - postwar Rifle Regiment
Second Lt Rifle 18 Apr and First Lt Dec 1818 : "dropped" 23 Feb 1820

First Lieutenant George Morrison (KY) - original US Regiment of Riflemen
First Lt Rifle 12 Dec 08 died 21 May 09 at Newport Kentucky

First Lieutenant David Moss (TN) - original US Regiment of Riflemen
First Lt Rifle 12 Dec 08 - unknown

First Lieutenant Loring Palmer (MA) - postwar Rifle Regiment
Second Lt 9th infy 12 Mar 1812: First Lt June 1813: wounded in battle of Cbippewa 5 July 1814: Captain July 1814: disbanded June 1815. Second Lt Rifle 18 Apr and First Lt Nov 1818 : regimental Quartermaster 1819 : dismissed 2 October 1822.


-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

First Lieutenant Charles Pentland (PA) - 4th Rifle Regiment - postwar Rifle Regiment
Ensign 4th Rifle. 16th and Third Lt 19 Sept 1814 : retained, May 1815, in Rifle : Second Lt Oct 1817 : First, Lt July 1818 : Adjutant 1818 : in 6th infy May 1821 : Capt July 1823 : dismissed. 15 Feb 1826
Court Martial records, Fort Atkinson, 1819-1827 #17,372 includes trials of Lt. Charles Pentland, 1823, and Capt. James Gray, 1825.
- http://www.nebraskahistory.org/lib-arch/research/public/federal_finding_aids/ft_atkinson.pdf
- brother Joseph was a Lieutenant (July 1821) and later Captain in the 6th inf- he was given command of the "light" B Co, armed with the Model 1803 Harpers Ferry, as insisted by his commander Major Bennet Riley, and saw action against the Kiowas and Comanches while guarding the Upper Crossing of the Arkansas river along the Santa Fe trail. - see "This Excellent & Gallant Rifle Corps; The Model 1803 Harpers Ferry in Service." from Man at Arms, Vol. 3, No.4, July/August 1981. by Dr. Wayne R. Austerman (Historian, U.S. Army Medical Department Center and School, Fort Sam Houston, TX.) This is a rare gem that includes vivid combat and post-war exploits of the Rifles - including the exploits of Bennett Riley. As Austerman comments on the abolishment in 1821 of the Rifle Regiment "It was a curiously illogical decision, for the specially trained and superbly armed riflemen would have been the ideal unit for infantry service on the Indian frontier. Unfortunately Congress preferred the clumsy, but cheaper, line units, and even then eliminated one regiment..." Riley's own testimony supported this line of thinking. In Riley, and his rifle inspired tactics against the Arikaras, Kiowa, and Comanches, Austerman provides a compelling example - elaborated on by Utley and like-minded western historians.
- Wheel boats on the Missouri: the journals and documents of the Atkinson-O'Fallon Expedition 1824-1826, by Henry Atkinson, Stephen Watts Kearny, Richard E. Jensen, James S. Hutchins, 2001
http://books.google.com/books?id=dn5eW976XpgC&printsec=frontcover
Early western travels, 1748-1846: a series of annotated reprints ..., Volume 14, edited by Reuben Gold Thwaites, 1905
http://books.google.com/books?id=KukTAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA172
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

First Lieutenant  Charles Porterfield (VA) - original US Regiment of Riflemen  
First Lt 1 rifle 3 May 08 died 16 Jan 10 
relation - son of Robert and nephew of  Charles Porterfield, of Morgan's Riflemen
"Robert, soldier, born in Frederick county, Virginia, 22 February, 1752; died in Augusta county, Virginia, 13 February, 1843, was appointed a lieutenant in Captain Peter B. Bruin's company of Continental troops in Winchester, Virginia, in 1776, served in Colonel Daniel Morgan's regiment through the campaigns of 1777-'9, the last year was aide to General William Woodford, and was in the battles of the Brandywine, Germantown, and Monmouth. He accompanied General Woodford to the south in December, 1779, and participated in the siege of Charleston, South Carolina, where he was surrendered a prisoner of war in May, 1780. He was appointed a brigadier-general of Virginia militia during the war of 1812, and commanded at Camp Holly, Virginia General Porterfield was a county magistrate for more than fifty years, and was twice high-sheriff...PORTERFIELD, Charles, soldier, born in Fredcrick county, Virginia, in 1750; died on Santee river, South Carolina, in October, 1780. He became a member of the first company that was raised in Frederick county in 1775 for service in the Revolutionary war, of which Daniel Morgan was elected captain, marched to Cambridge, near Boston, and soon afterward joined in the expedition against Quebec, and was made prisoner in the attempt on that fortress. The assailing column, to which he belonged, was under the command of Colonel Arnold. When that officer was wounded and carried from the ground, Porter-field, with Morgan, rushing forward, passed the first and second barriers. After being exchanged he re-entered the service as captain in the rifle-corps of Colonel Morgan and participated in all the battles in which it was engaged during the campaigns of 1777-'8. In 1779 he was appointed by Governor Jefferson lieutenant-colonel of a Virginia regiment that had been equipped mainly at his own expense, with which, in the spring of 1780, he marched to the relief of Charleston, South Carolina He remained in South Carolina and joined the army of General Gates a few days before the battle of Camden. His command formed part of the advanced guard of Gates's army, and unexpectedly met that of the enemy about one o'clock A. M. on 16 August, a moonlight night. While making a gallant resistance and holding the enemy in check, he received a mortal wound, his left leg being shattered just below the knee. He was carried from the field, remained ten days without surgical attention, and was then taken in a cart twelve miles to Camden where the required amputation was performed. While a prisoner in Camden he was treated with great kindness and attention by both Lord Cornwallis and Lord Rawdon, who supplied all his wants, He was paroled, but died from the effects of his wound."
Edited Appletons Encyclopedia, Copyright © 2001 VirtualologyTM
http://www.virtualology.com/charlesporterfield/
The twentieth century biographical dictionary of notable Americans, by Rossiter Johnson, John Howard Brown, The Biographical Society, 1904
http://books.google.com/books?id=ElIDAAAAYAAJ&printsec=frontcover

mother was Margaret Heth Porterfield, "sister of William Heth (1850-1808), Colonel in the Revolutionary War..."
The Porterfields, Frank Burke Porterfield, Southeastern Press, 1948, see page 78.
JOURNAL OF CHARLES PORTERFIELD...while a prisoner of war in Quebec  - Publications of the Southern History Association, Volume 6, by Southern History Association, 1902, pp. 113-131
http://books.google.com/books?id=5hwLAAAAIAAJ&printsec=frontcover
The twentieth century biographical dictionary of notable Americans, by Rossiter Johnson, John Howard Brown, The Biographical Society, 1904
http://books.google.com/books?id=ElIDAAAAYAAJ&printsec=frontcover
An officer of very extraordinary merit: Charles Porterfield and the American, by Michael Cecere, Heritage Books, 2004
http://books.google.com/books?id=6448ThfE3sgC&printsec=frontcover
They Are Indeed a Very Useful Corps: American Riflemen in the Revolutionary War, by Michael Cecere, Heritage Books, 2006
http://books.google.com/books?id=6448ThfE3sgC&printsec=frontcover

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


First Lieutenant Martin Scott (VT) - postwar Rifle Regiment
Second Lt 26th infy July 21 Apr and First Lt May 1814: disbanded Juno 1815. Second Lt Rifle Apr 1818 : First Lt Nov 1819: in 5th infy May 1821 : Captain Aug 1828 : brevet Major "for gallant conduct in battles of Palo Alto Rio de la Palma" 9 May 1846 (Apr 1847): Major 5th infy 29 June 1846: commanded his regiment and brevet Lt colonel "for gallant and meritorious conduct in the several conflicts at Monterey Мехico" 23 Sept 1846 (May 1847): killed 8 Sept 1847 at the head of hie regiment in battle of El Molino del Rey.
born in Bennington, Vermont, about 1795 ; died near Molino del Rey, Mexico, 8 September, 1847. He was appointed a lieutenant in the army in April, 1814, became captain in the 5th infantry in August, 1828, was brevetted major for gallantry at Palo Alto and Resaca de la Palma, 9 Nay, 1846, and was promoted major on 29 June. He was brevetted lieutenant-colonel for services at Monterey, where he led his regiment, and he was killed at its head in the battle of Molino del Rey. Colonel Scott had been famous as a marksman from early youth, and it is of him that the well-known incident is related of the coon that said: " You need not fire, I'll come down." (also attributed to Davy Crockett) Fort Martin Scott, TX - http://famousamericans.net/martinscott/

"July 21. " From the Missouri Intelligencer.''
"Franklin, (Boonslick) July 2d, 1819.
"We announce with great satisfaction the arrival here, this day, of five large Keel Boats, with 260 troops, exclusive of officers, being a part of the expedition destined for the Yellow Stone. Our citizens were apprised of their approach by the firing of swivels from on board the boats, and every demonstration of joy and satisfaction was manifested at an event, the successful result of which, promises such important advantages, as well to this portion of the country as to the nation at large."
Colonel Talbott Chambers, Captain James S. Gray, Lieutenant Scott, Lieutenant Keith and Doctor Malone were the officers who came with the troops.
pp. 24-26
"YELLOWSTONE EXPEDITION,"NOTES OF THE EARLY HISTORY OF THE NEBRASKA COUNTRY, Publications - Nebraska State Historical Society, Volume 20, by Nebraska State Historical Society, 1922

http://books.google.com/books?id=MJ0UAAAAYAAJ&printsec=frontcover

- THE MEXICAN WAR AND ITS HEROES, 1860
http://books.google.com/books?id=gLr9tA1xMJgC&printsec=frontcover
- Appleton's cyclopædia of American biography, Volume 5 by James Grant Wilson, John Fiske, 1888
http://books.google.com/books?id=iG0sAAAAIAAJ&printsec=frontcover
- Green Mountain poets edited by Albert J. Sanborn, 1872
DEATH OF COL MARTIN SCOTT, p. 253
http://books.google.com/books?id=zFZKAAAAIAAJ&printsec=frontcover
- Hints to riflemen by Horace William Shaler Cleveland, 1864
http://books.google.com/books?id=eY4OAAAAYAAJ&printsec=frontcover
- Thirty Years of Army Life on the Border by Randolph Marcy, 1866
Chapter XIV - Captain Martin Scott
http://books.google.com/books?id=Dtr-PPZZOGwC&printsec=frontcover
- The Coon Story - The Bear-hunter - The Horserace - Courting Days- Rifle and Pistol Shooting - His Duel - Expeditions with Explorers - Hunting in Texas - Wonderful Dog - "Tally Ho!" - Return Home to Bennington - His Death ..424"
http://books.google.com/books?id=Dtr-PPZZOGwC&printsec=frontcover
- also an excerpt in Harper's magazine, Volume 33 - Making of America Project pp.442-43
http://books.google.com/books?id=WAYwAAAAMAAJ&printsec=frontcover
Three Score Years and Ten: Life-Long Memories of Fort Snelling, Minnesota, and other parts of the West,by Charlotte Ouisconsin Clark Van Cleve, 1888, "Martin Scott" p. 29, p. 152
http://books.google.com/books?id=xbsdAAAAMAAJ&printsec=frontcover
- Over the world: Travels, adventures and achievements by Henry Howe, 1883
Dreadful work - Molino del Rey - Deserters fate - Heroic death of Colonel Martin Scott the famous hunter - Martin Scott and the coon - Martin Scott and the book agent - Chapultepec - General Scott cries for joy - Surrender of Mexico - Peace and crying women - The demons of war - Retires to civil life - Sketch of Sergeant Reeves by the author p. 160
http://books.google.com/books?id=PNtKAAAAYAAJ&printsec=frontcover
... Heroic death of Colonel Martin Scott, the famous hunter — Martin Scott and
p.10
"Among the many noted and remarkable persons who have been prominently connected with Northwestern history Capt Martin Scott was one of the most singular Materials from which to frame a biography of him are very meagre and what few I have are drawn from a variety of sources but are I believe reliable...."
MEMOIR OF CAPT MARTIN SCOTT by JFW
Collections of the Minnesota Historical Society. volume III, 1888, pp. 180-187

http://books.google.com/books?id=lbQTAAAAYAAJ&printsec=frontcover 
CAPTAIN MARTIN SCOTT pp.86-88
- Game laws in brief and woodcraft magazine, Volume 1 by Charles B. Reynolds, 1899
http://books.google.com/books?id=2pwZAAAAYAAJ&printsec=frontcover
Old Fort Snelling by Marcus L. Hansen, 1918
- http://www.gutenberg.org/files/22719/22719-h/22719-h.htm
- http://books.google.com/books?id=x4ymo1KPZbgC&printsec=frontcover (2008)
- Lieut Col Martin Scott a native of Bennington..Vermont: the Green mountain state, Volume 3 by Walter Hill Crockett, 1921
http://books.google.com/books?id=UnYUAAAAYAAJ&printsec=frontcover

"a version of the the tale of Captain Martin Scott and the treed raccoon, which he he learned on the island  at Mackinaw"
- Two Items of Midwest Folklore Noted by William Cullen Bryant, 1956
Midwest Folklore 6 (1956): 141-146
 - A Shovel of Stars: The Making of the American West - 1800 to the Present by Ted Morgan, 1996 - citing Minnesota Historical Collections Vol 3
http://books.google.com/books?id=aveRrVPqc0UC&printsec=frontcover

and many, many other secondary and repetitious sources - search google books using "Martin Scott" + 5th Infantry or + Bennington, Vermont etc
Fort Martin Scott, Texas
"The Eighth Military Department renamed the camp in December 1849 for Maj. Martin Scott (Fifth United States Infantry), who was killed at the battle of Molina del Rey in 1847. Fort Martin Scott served as a first line of defense, keeping the peace and minimizing possible friction caused by an active trade between the Comanches and German settlers...."
- http://famousamericans.net/martinscott/
- To Mexico with Scott: letters of Captain E. Kirby Smith to his wife, by Ephraim Kirby Smith Johnston
http://books.google.com/books?id=qMRDZeIwd7AC&printsec=frontcover
Mcintosh, Colonel, pages 46, 52, 54,182, 183, 213
Scott, Major, pages 101, 104, 113, 120, 124, 129, 130, 149, 155, 156, 213

Historical Highlights - A Famous Coon Story - Crockett- Martin Scott - By Elmo Scott Watson - The Pentwater News, May 30, 1941
(E.S. Watson incorrectly refers to a Fifth Rifle Regiment in the War of 1812 - there were only four (1-4).  Martin Scott was assigned to the 26th Infantry Regiment during the war and then the  post-war Rifle Regiment in 1818.  Scott transferred to the Fifth Infantry Regiment when the Rifle Regiment was disbanded in 1821.)

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

First Lieutenant William G. Shade (MD) - postwar Rifle Regiment
Ensign 14th infy 18 Mar and Third Lt Oct 1813: Adjutant 1813 : Second Lt Aug 1814 : retained, Dec 1816,in Arty: resigned 1 Apr 1816. Second Lt Rifle 22 May 1817: First Lt Feb 1818: resigned 10 Nov 1818

First Lieutenant Samuel Shannon (MD) - postwar Rifle Regiment
Sergeant and Ensign 14th infy July and Third Lt Aug 1814 : disbanded June 18 15.Second Lt Rifle 10 Sept 1818: First Lt Feb 1820: Assistant commissary subsistence Apr 1820: in 6th infy May 1821 : transferred Jan 1823 to 1st infy : Assistant quatermaster (rank Captain) May 1826 : Capt July 1831: died 4 Sept 36 at Tallahassee, Florida.

First Lieutenant David B. Stith (VA) - postwar Rifle Regiment
Sec It 35th infy 31 Mar 1813: First Lt Sept 1814: retained, May 1815, in Rifle—declined; see War of 1812: The Search for the old 35th US Infantry Regiment

First Lieutenant Jacob Tipton (TN) - 1st Rifle Regiment
Ens Rifle 31 Dec '12: Third Lt Mar '13:  Sec Lt 1 rifle Jan '14: distinguished under Maj L Morgan in action at Scajocada creek: First Lt Nov '14: retained May '16 as Sec 'Lt 7 infy with bvt of First Lt: First Lt July '16: Capt June '17: dropped 31 Jan '18: US Indian Agent Mackinac Apr '18 

----------------------------------SECOND LIEUTENANTS--------------------------------------------


Second Lieutenant Willis N. Bryan (KY) - postwar Rifle Regiment
Ensign 28th infy 20 May, and Third It Aug. 1813: Second Lt Apr 1814: retained, May 1815 in Rifle. : transferred Jan 1816 to 8th infy—declined

Second Lieutenant George F Catlet (KY) - postwar Rifle Regiment
Second Lt Rifle 20 Apr and resigned Aug 1818

Second Lieutenant Roswell Conant (VT) - postwar Rifle Regiment
Cadet Dec 1814: Second Lt Rifle 1 July 1819 : resigned 30 Sept 1820

Second Lieutenant Overton W. Crockett (KY) - 2nd Rifle Regiment - postwar Rifle Regiment
Ensign 28th infy 30 June, and Third Lt Oct 1813 : Second Lt 2nd Rifle. Sept 1814: retained, May 1815, in Rifle — declined.

Second Lieutenant John Duncan (PA) - postwar Rifle Regiment
Second Lt It Rifle 4 Dec. 1819: resigned 4 Dec 1821

Second Lieutenant John Edmondson Jr (PA) - 2nd Rifle Regiment - postwar Rifle Regiment
Sergeant: Ensign 2nd Rifle 30 May 1814: disbanded June 1815. Second Lt Rifle, 22 Mar 1819: Assistant commissary subsistence Mar 1819 : disbanded 1 June 1821

Second Lieutenant Wilie J. Gordon (NC) - postwar Rifle Regiment
Third Lt 10th infy 24 Mar and Second Lt Nov 1813 : Second Lt 3rd Rifle Mar 1814—declined: retained, May 1815, in Rifle.: resigned 10 Sept 1816

Second Lieutenant Thomas Griffith (KY) - 2nd Rifle Regiment - postwar Rifle Regiment
Third Lt 28th infy 20 Мar and Second Lt June 1813 : in 2nd Rifle Mar 1814 : retained Dec 1815 : resigned 20 Feb 1817

Second Lieutenant Abner Harrison (TN) - 3rd Rifle Regiment - postwar Rifle Regiment
Second Lt 3rd Rifle 17 Mar 1814: retained, Dec 1815, in Rifle. : First Lt Mar 1817 : "not reported, dropped," 15 July 1817.

Second Lieutenant Charles Harrison (KY) - 2nd Rifle Regiment - postwar Rifle Regiment
Ensign 28th infy 20 May 1818: Third Lt 2nd Rifle Mar and Second Lt May 1814 : retained, May 1815, in Rifle — declined.

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Second Lieutenant Elzey L James (KY) - original US Regiment of Riflemen
Second Llt Rifle 3 May 08, died 9 Apr 10 at Newport Kentucky

relation/brother? Daniel Field James - "Daniel settled the estate of Elzey L. James, F 1810"....Rev. Daniel Field James "an eminently godly man," was the son of John and Clara Nall James, who came from Culpeper , Virginia, to Kentucky in 1785. He m Eleanor Evans, Pulaski 1816. They lived in Pulaski, [County KY]..."
Forks of Elkhorn Church: with genealogies of early members, by Ermina Jett Darnell
Genealogical Pub. co., 1980
http://books.google.com/books?id=d0jkAAAAMAAJ&q

grandson? - of Joseph James born 1750 Culpeper County, VA -  1775 in VA Regiment -  died Scott Co KY 1818- "Joseph...married Polly & their children included John, who married Miss Nall/Nalley." p. 12
Virginia West Virginia Genealogical Data from Revolutionary War Pension, by Patrick G. Wardell,1992
http://books.google.com/books?id=OXI8uWIhPv4C&printsec=frontcover

"JOSEPH JAMES, a resident of Culpeper Co., Va., was paid for Indians in 1758. Joseph James, age 68, while residing in Scott Co., Ky., in 1818, was granted a pension for services in the Va. Line."p. 246
Genealogy of the Cloyd, Basye and Tapp families in America:, by Augustus Davis Cloyd, 1912
http://books.google.com/books?id=-bVYAAAAMAAJ&printsec=frontcover

"Webb-James-Boone
A Frances Webb who was I think a niece of Daniel Boone, lived in Franklin Co, NC and Feb 20, 1794 m Philip Henry James son of Joseph James Culpeper Co, Va, Nov 11 1764 and d Nov 10 1811.  He ran away from home at fifteen and enlisted in the Rev army... .... James family of Culpeper Co Va, They were connected in some way with William Henry Harrison.  Philip Henry James emigrated to Ky in 1803 with his wife and three sons. William in the War of 1812, Thomas, Burton Allen  - R.C.E." p. 371
Daughters of the American Revolution magazine, Volumes 48-49,  By Daughters of the American Revolution, 1916
http://books.google.com/books?id=oHsmAQAAIAAJ&printsec=frontcover

"Thomas James was descended from a long line of distinguished and patriotic ancestors. His father, Henry James, of Culpepper, C. H., Va., when a mere lad, joined the War of the Revolution, in which his father, Maj. Joseph James, was also serving. His mother, Frances Webb James, belonged to one of the first families of North Carolina, being a daughter of John Webb, also of the Revolution, who married a near relative of the famous Daniel Boone, the Father of Kentucky...."p. 13 (includes Letters to William Allen James II, son of William  as a cadet at the USMA, West Point. "I have in my day performed a campaign or two in the war of 1812. I had occasion to notice that some very unprincipled men, soldiers, were great favorites with the officers and some men possessed of a correct principle were not. I have noticed the same out of the army." )" "My father's father Philip Henry James and John T James father Thomas James were brothers natives of Culpepper Co Va WM JAMES "pp. 16-18
JUDGE THOMAS JAMES, The register of the Kentucky State Historical Society, Volume 14, By Kentucky Historical Society, 1916
http://books.google.com/books?id=8XEUAAAAYAAJ&printsec=frontcover

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Second Lieutenant Simeon James (Unk) - original US Regiment of Riflemen - 1st Rifle Regiment
Sergant: Ensign Rifle 8 Oct 1813: Third Lt 1st Rifle. Mar and Second Lt Nov 1814: disbanded June 1815
(action at Hoople's Creek prepatory to the Battle of Chrysler's Farm) "Ensign James of the Rifle Corps alone pursued a party of six or eight of the enemy, killed one and took one prisoner. He took one prisoner the night we landed - an officer on horseback who was reconnoitering us...The enemy made another stand about a mile below in force, from 8 to 12 hundred militia and about 30 Indians, but a shot from the riflemen dispersed them into the woods." - Rufus McIntire to John Holmes, 8 November, 1813,: "The War of 1812 in Northern New York: The Letters of Capain Rufus McIntire," ed. John C. Fredriksen New York History 68(1987), 368. - (cited in Green Coats and Glory: The United States Regiment of Riflemen, 1808-1821, by John C. Fredriksen, Ph.D. Old Fort Niagara Association, 2000, p.40)

Second Lieutenant John JH Lewis (VA) - postwar Rifle Regiment
Second Lt Rifle 12 Nov 1818: resigned 10 June 1819

Second Lieutenant Thomas Mahon (PA) - postwar Rifle Regiment
Ensign 16th infy 12 Oct 1812 : Third Lt and Second Lt Apr and First Lt Aug 1813: disbanded June 1815. Second Lt Rifle 22 July 1818: resigned 20 Nov 1819

Second Lieutenant William Markle Jr (Upper Canada) - postwar Rifle Regiment
Second Lt Canadian Volunteers 19 Apr 1814: retained, May 1815, in Rifle. : resigned 31 Mar 1817

Second Lieutenant Ignatius P McCandless (VA) - postwar Rifle Regiment
Second Lt Rifle 22 July 1818 : resigned 1 Jan 1819

Second Lieutenant William D. McCray (OH) - postwar Rifle Regiment
Second Lt Rifle 3 Feb 1819: transferred 6th infy? First Lt Nov 1821 : resigned 1 June 1823

Second Lieutenant Nathan L Reeves (OH) - postwar Rifle Regiment
Ensign 27th infy 20 May 1813: transferred 1814, to 19th infy: Third Lt Julv and Second Lt Nov 1814 : disbanded June 1815. Second Lt Rifle Sept 1818: dismissed 11 Mar 1819

Second Lieutenant Wharton Rector (Missouri territory) - postwar Rifle Regiment
Second Lt Rifle 12 July 1820 : resigned 20 Nov 1821 (Lt colonel 2nd dragoons 18 June 1836—declined.) Paymaster 15 Aug 1836: died 8 Feb 1842 near Ft Smith Arkansas

Second Lieutenant Stephen Shea (PA) - postwar Rifle Regiment
Ensign 1st infy 11 Mar 1814: Third Lt Apr and Second Lt May 1814: disbanded June 1815.Second Lt Rifle Jan. 1820: disbanded June 1821

Second Lieutenant George D. Snyder (MD) - postwar Rifle Regiment
Ensign 6th infy 30 Apr and Second Lt Sept 1812 : First Lt June 1814: retained, May 1812, Second Lt Arty, with brevet of First Lt: resigned 31 Oct 1819. Second Lt Rifle. 13 Oct 1820 : disbanded June 1821

Second Lieutenant William Thompson (MD) - postwar Rifle Regiment
vice Thomnson in 1821 Register : Sergeant: Ensign 14th infy 13 Mar and Third Lt May 1813: Aug 1814 : disbanded June 1815. Second Lt Rifle 27 Oct 1820 : disbanded June 1821

Second Lieutenant  Lewis Weir (TN) - original U.S. Regiment of Riflemen
Sec Lt Rifle. 12 Dec '08 : died 14 Nov. '09 at Natchez, Mississippi

Second Lieutenant Richard Wells (MD) - postwar Rifle Regiment
Second Lt Rifle 27 Oct 1820 : in 6th infy May 1821, and resigned 1 Dec 1821

Second Lieutenant Horace S. White (MA) - original U.S. Regiment of Riflemen
Sec Lt Rifle. 12 Dec. '08 : resigned 1 July '09.

Second Lieutenant John H. Winder (MD) - postwar Rifle Regiment
Cadet Aug 1814 : Second Lt Arty 1 July 1820: in Rifle. Oct 1820: in 4th arty May 1821 : in 3rd arty Aug 1821 : resigned 31 Aug 1823. Second Lt 1st arty 2 Apr 1827 : Assistant instructor Infy tactics M. A. Nov 1827 to Sept 1828 : Assitant commissary and subsistence Sept 1828 : First Lt Nov 1833 : Adjutant 1838 to 1840 : Captain Oct 1842: brevet Major "for gallantry and meritorious conduct in battles of Contreras and Churbusco" 20 Aug 1847 (Aug 1848) : brevet Lt colonel "for gallantry and meritorious conduct on entering the City of Mexico" 14 Sept 1847 (Mar 1851) resigned 27 April 1861 Brigadier General С S A war 1861 to 1865; died 7 Feb 1865.


John Henry Winder: Born Feb. 21, 1800. Was the son of General William H. Winder, who served in the War of 1812-15, and was defeated at Bladensburg in 1814.
Bill Thayer's Notes base on Cullum's registry: [a must visit for any Army Register buff....]

Military History. — Cadet at the Military Academy, Aug. 5, 1814, to July 1, 1820, when he was graduated and promoted in the Army to Second Lieut., Corps of Artillery, July 1, 1820.
Transferred to Rifles, Oct. 23, 1820.
Served: in garrison at Ft. McHenry, Md., 1820; on the Florida Frontier,(Second Lieut., 4th Artillery, in Re-organization of Army, June 1, 1821)
(Transferred to 3d Artillery, Aug. 16, 1821)
1820-22; on Ordnance duty, Feb. to Aug. 20, 1822; and on leave of absence, 1822-23.
Resigned, Aug. 31, 1823.
Civil History. — Unknown.
Re-appointed in the United States Army with the rank of
Second Lieut., 1st Artillery, Apr. 2, 1827.
Served: in garrison at Ft. Trumbull, Ct., 1827; at the Military Academy, as Asst. Instructor of Infantry Tactics, Nov. 22, 1827, to Sep. 21, 1828; in garrison at Ft. Johnston, N. C., 1828-29; on Engineer duty (Cape Fear River Improvement), June 2, 1829, to Dec. 1, 1832; in garrison  at Ft. Johnston, N. C., 1832-33, First Lieut., 1st Artillery, Nov. 30, 1833
1834-35; on Engineer duty, May 30,1835, to Jan. 21, 1836; in the Florida War, 1836, 1836-38; as Adjutant, 1st Artillery, at Regimental Headquarters, May 23, 1838, to Jan. 20, 1840; as Bearer of Despatches to Bvt. Brig.General Arbuckle, 1840; on Maine Frontier, at Houlton, Me., 1840, pending "Disputed Territory" controversy; in garrison at Ft. Preble, Me., 1840-41, 1841-42, — Ft. Sullivan, Me., 1842-43, Captain, 1st Artillery, Oct. 7, 1842, Hancock Barracks, Me., 1843-44, — Ft. Kent. Me., 1844-45, — Ft. Brooke, Fla., 1845-46, — and Ft. Pickens, Fla., 1846-47; in the War with Mexico, 1847-48, being engaged in the Skirmish of La Hoya, June 20, 1847, — Skirmish of Ocalaca, Aug. 16, 1847, — Battle of Contreras, Aug. 19-20, 1847, — Battle of Churubusco, Aug. 20, -
Bvt. Major, Aug. 20, 1847, for Gallant and Meritorious Conduct in the Battles of Contreras and Churubusco, Mex. -
1847, — Storming of Chapultepec, Sep. 13, 1847, — and Assault and Capture of the City of Mexico, Sep. 13-14, 1847
- Bvt. Lieut.Col, Sep. 14, 1847, for Gallant Conduct on entering the City of Mexico; in garrison at Ft.Columbus, N. Y., 1849-50, — Ft. Myers, Fla., 1850-53, — Ft. Moultrie, S. C., 1853-56, — Key West Barracks, Fla., 1856-57, — Ft. Dallas, Fla., 1857-58, — and Barrancas Barracks, Fla., 1858-60; and on leave of absence, 1860-61.
(Major, 3d Artillery, Nov. 22, 1860 - Resigned, Apr. 27, 1861.
Joined in the Rebellion of 1861-66 against the United States.
John Winder's Confederate career was an unhappy one: he was in charge of the Confederacy's military prison camps, a hell in which many Union soldiers died of disease and starvation. It was widely claimed in the North at the time that they were being intentionally starved, and by dying of a heart attack when he did, Winder narrowly missed being hanged after the war: his second-in-command suffered that fate, a scapegoat sacrifice to the shades of those thousands of Union dead. At a century and a half's remove from the passions of the war, it now seems likely that the terrible prison conditions were due much more to the Union government itself, whose stranglehold over the South made them inevitable; and the conditions were not good either at Northern prison camps, like Fort Douglas where so many Confederate soldiers died.


Died, Feb. 7, 1865, at Columbia, S. C.:b Aged 65.
Buried, Green Mount Cemetery, Baltimore, MD.
The Author's Note:

b Some online sites, following different print sources, give his place of death as Florence, S. C.
http://penelope.uchicago.edu/Thayer/E/Gazetteer/Places/America/United_States/Army/USMA/Cullums_Register/242*.html

"John H. Winder - wiki:
Early life and career
Winder was born at "Rewston" in Somerset County, Maryland, a son of U.S. Army Brig. Gen. William H. Winder and his wife Gertrude Polk. Winder's father fought during the War of 1812, and he was a second cousin to future Confederate general Charles Sidney Winder.
In 1814 Winder entered the United States Military Academy at West Point, and graduated 11th of 30 cadets in 1820. He was commissioned a second lieutenant in the artillery, and served first at Fort McHenry in Baltimore, Maryland, and then in Florida.
During the early 1820s Winder went through numerous transfers going from the U.S. Rifle Regiment in 1820, to the 4th U.S. Winder resigned his commission on August 31, 1823, and would be out of the Army for almost four years. Later in 1823 Winder married Elizabeth Shepherd. The next year his father died, putting him in a deep economic strain, and his mother was forced to make her home into a boardinghouse. Winder had failed to manage his father-in-law's plantation successfully, so he was unable to help his mother. In 1825 Winder's wife Elizabeth died, leaving him to raise their young son William and forcing him to go back into duty in the U.S. Army.
On April 2, 1827, Winder was reinstated as a second lieutenant, and he served in the 1st U.S. Artillery. He would be promoted to first lieutenant on November 30, 1833. He then taught tactics at West Point in 1837, where among his students was future Confederate President Jefferson Davis. He lost his job at West Point after one year, though, because of a temper that he got with a cadet. Winder then became the 1st Artillery's Regimental Adjutant from May 23, 1838, until January 20, 1840. He was promoted to captain on October 7, 1842.
Mexican War
Winder fought well in Mexico, winning brevet promotions to major on August 20, 1847 (for both his conduct at the Battle of Contreras and for the Battle of Churubusco) and to lieutenant colonel on September 14 (for his actions at the Battle for Mexico City.) He was also wounded in the fight near the Belén Gate, which guarded an approach into Mexico City, on that same day. After the war he was promoted to major on November 22, 1860.
American Civil War
Winder chose to follow the Confederate cause and resigned his U.S. Army commission on April 27, 1861. He was appointed a colonel in the Confederate Army infantry on March 16. He was then promoted to brigadier general on June 21 and the next day was made Assistant Inspector General of the Camps of Instruction that were in the Confederacy's capital of Richmond, Virginia, a post he would hold until October 21. In addition to his duties involving prisons, he was responsible for dealing with deserters, local law enforcement, and for a short time setting the commodity prices for the residents of a city dealing with a doubled population. During this time he commanded Libby Prison in Richmond as well.
In April 1864, Winder appointed Capt. Henry Wirz commandant a new prison camp in Georgia called Camp Sumter, better known as the infamous Andersonville Prison. Winder commanded the Department of Henrico for much of the war, lasting until May 5, 1864. He then commanded the 2nd District of the Department of North Carolina & Southern Virginia from May 25 until June 7. Ten days later he briefly commanded Camp Sumter himself, lasting until July 26. Winder then was given command of all military prisons in Georgia as well as those in Alabama until November 21, when he was put in charge of the Confederate Bureau of Prison Camps, a post which he held until his death on February 7, 1865.
Death and legacy
Winder died on duty in Florence, South Carolina, of a heart attack in 1865. His body was brought back to Maryland and interred at Green Mount Cemetery in Baltimore.
The assignment to run prisons in the South during the American Civil War was a difficult job at best, hampered by the Confederacy's poor supply system combined with diminishing resources. In their post-war writings, some of the high level leaders of the Confederate government voiced the difficulties of Winder's assignment, saying:
    ...President Davis, Secretary Seddon, and Adjutant Cooper declared that he was a much-maligned man. He was set to perform a task made impossible by the inadequacy of supplies of men, food, clothing, and medicines.
During the war, Winder was frequently derided in Northern newspapers, who accused him of intentionally starving Union prisoners. Military historian Ezra J. Warner believed these charges were without merit, saying "Winder adopted every means at his command to assure that the prisoners received the same ration as did Confederate soldiers in the field, scanty as that allotment was."

Blakey, Arch Fredric; "General John H. Winder, C.S.A,", University Press of Florida, 1990,   
Eicher, John H., and Eicher, David J., Civil War High Commands, Stanford University Press, 2001     Wakelyn, Jon L., Biographical Dictonary of the Confederacy, Greenwood Press, 1977,    
Warner, Ezra J., Generals in Gray: The Lives of the Confederate Commanders, Louisiana State University Press, 1959   
www.pddoc.com PDDOC biography of Winder.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_H._Winder
                   
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
3rd Lieutenant Elias Smur - 4th Rifle Regiment
Ft Stevens, Battery Smur (1902) named for 3rd Lt. Elias Smur, killed during the War of 1812, this battery was armed with two 3-inch rapid fire guns. Battery Smur was designed to protect mine operations in the Columbia River. It was deactivated in 1920 and the guns were removed and scrapped. - www.oregonstateparks.org - last Rifle officer killed in combat in the War of 1812.

------------------------------------------------ENSIGNS---------------------------------------------------------------

Ensign Joseph S. Pepper (KY) -  original U.S. Regiment of Riflemen
Ens Rifle. 3 May '08 : resigned May '09

Ensign Elias Stallings (GA) - original U.S. Regiment of Riflemen - 1st Rifle Regiment
Ens Rifle 3 May 08 Sec Lt May '09 First Lt Mar '11 Capt Rifle Nov '13 disbanded June 15
see Chapter 6 in Florida Fiasco: Rampant Rebels on the Georgia-Florida Border, 1810-1815, by Rembert W. Patrick, 1954, University of Georgia Press, 2010
http://books.google.com/books?id=JWc3cvE0Kk0C&printsec=frontcover 
The Other War of 1812: The Patriot War and the American Invasion of Spanish, by James G. Cusick, 2007
http://books.google.com/books?id=BxHE3OsgU9EC&printsec=frontcover

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Ensign Arthur W. Thornton (NY) - original U.S. Regiment of Riflemen
Ens Rifle 3 May '08: Sec Lt July '09: transf Mar '11, to Light arty: First Lt Mar '11: Capt Jan '13: retained May '15 in Light arty: resigned 1 Jan '17: Vir Sec Lt 4th infy and Ast commissary subsistance 30 Nov '19: Fst Lt Apr '23: Capt Nov '35: died 2 Nov '36, at Pensacola Flo.

"From the Pensacola Gazette, Oct. 18. "
H. L. H. " has our thanks for the "reminiscence" which be has supplied for this day's paper. For twenty years after the events recorded in the "reminiscence" Capt. Thornton was the same gallant and generous spirit that he shewed himself at Lake Champlain. If he ever did wrong, it was from an excess of benevolence. If he has an enemy on earth, that man is a foe to virtue. But a dark cloud now rests upon his gallant spirit. The life which he was always prompt to peril in his country's service, is now threatened by that dreadful malady, a paralysis. About three months since he was attacked by this disease, and it is much feared that he cannot recover. He and his family are now at Cantonment Clinch with the Company of Artillery, stationed there.

To the Editor of the Pensacola Gazette:
Sir—If you agree with myself that the following "reminiscence," which I have lately met with in an old newspaper, merits a re-publication, you are at liberty to give it a place in your journal, (Capt. Thornton, the subject of the incident detailed below, is so well known in Pensacola, that no commendation of mine is necessary to add to his well-merited reputatian. Amongst his numerous acquaintances in the Army, Capt. T. has uniformly maintained a high character for pure and unsullied honor, and all the qualities of a gentleman and officer.

After the incident alluded to, Capt. T. resigned his commission for the purpose of following other pursuits; but old habits and associations were too strong to be thus easily laid aside; and in 1818 he again entered the Army as a Lieutenant. Since that period he has performed important and responsible duties, particularly in the Commissary and Quarter Master's Department, to the satisfaction of his superiors, as well as of those with whom he served, and has again been recently brevetted as Captain.
H. L. H.

REMINISCENCE OF THE LATE WAR.
" Our Country owes a debt of gratitude;
" I hope she'll pay it"

It is now about 20 years since I first met with Thornton in service—he was then a handsome young Rifle Officer, very much, and deservedly, esteemed. In 1812, when an addition was made to the United States Army, young Thornton received promotion, in the Regiment of Light Artillery. In the spring of 1814, Gen. Wilkinson was withdrawn, and Major Gen. Izard placed in command of this Division of the Army. Head-quarters were at Plattsburg, New York, the General Hospital and a Brigadier's command at Burlington, Vermont, the Navy Yard,near Vergennes.at the mouth of Otter river, about 21 miles up the Lake from Burlington. This place was open, and (except a small militia command, posted there to guard the naval stores, &c.) unprotected. The armed vessels of the Lake service, were on the stocks, under the hands of ship carpenters. When the enemy's fleet appeared on the Lake, our unarmed craft fled, like sheep from the wolf. We were unprepared to meet them on the Lake. The enemy's fleet was seen from Burlington, standing up the Lake; I think Gen. Macomb then commanded at Burlington, and quickly penetrated the intentions and views of our enterprising foe. They expected to capture our stores, and destroy our vessels building at Otter river—and thereby to cripple our movements and frustrate our designs, at least lor one whole campaign.. It is almost impossible to calculate the extent of injury our cause and country would have sustained.
It was about sun-set, when Capt. Thornton was ordered to proceed from Burlington
with his company, to the Navy Yard, there to protect the stores and vessels at every hazard. Away drove this little band, with all the speed their horses could make, with four pieces of light Artillery. Fortunately the wind was light, and the enemy's vessels obliged to beat up the lake. Capt. Thornton arrived in the night; and by great exertions, when the morning dawned, had constructed a hasty battery, assisted in part w ith cord-wood and some shiptimbers—erected bis furnace for heating shot—and masked his works, with Hemlock, Pine and other ever-green bushes—so as to conceal his preparations and his little force, from the enemy's view.
At day-light the enemy's fleet stood in for the Navy Yard. They hoped to make an easy prey of our Naval Stores; to burn our vessels and then to sail proudly the masters of Lake Champlain. Capt. Thornton viewed the approach of this superior foe, and with his little band, behind their temporary defences, every man at his post, stood ready for action, prepared with their gallant young Captain to sacrifice life, rather than yield up a matter of such immense importance to our country. The comm nd was one of great responsibility, and Thornton felt it, to his heart's core. When the enemy had nearcd to a proper point, Capt. Thornton opened bis little battery, and so well were his pieces served, that in the first moment of surprise, the enemy were brought to a halt, and the British tars ordered to prepare for action; some confusion appeared, and some random shots were returned. But the enemy finding they were receiving hot sbot, from pieces so well served, and fearing the loss of some of their vessels, or perhaps the while fleet, they moved beyond the reach of Thornton's light pieces, and then stood down the Lake. I believe, if Capt. Arthur W. Thornton is living, he is still in our army; and it is to be regretted, that by any transfer, from one part of the army to another, an officer of Thornton's merits, and long service, should lose rank.

Some time after the close of the last war, accidentally meeting with Major Gen. Izard, at Lancaster, we spent the evening together at his lodgings. In the course of conversation the General assured me, he was unable to obtain a Brevet rank for any of the officers of his Division, and specified particularly his anxiety to succeed in the cases of Capt. Arthur W. Thornton of Light Artillery, and Major T. M. Nelson of the 10th Iufautry, who were both gallant young officers of Virginia. February, 1829. A. M."p. 6
REMINISCENCE OF THE LATE WAR, Army and Navy chronicle, Volume 1, by Benjamin Homans, 1835
http://books.google.com/books?id=JnFMAAAAYAAJ&printsec=frontcover

"In this city, on Wednesday, the 2d Nov., Captain ARTHUR W.THORNTON, of the army of the United States. In June 1834, he was attacked by a paralytic affection, which deprived him of the power of articulation. In other respects he possessed his faculties almost unimpaired. He has, however, been sinking gradually ever since. In the death of Capt. Thornton, the army has lost one of its most gallant spirits, and society one of its most cherished members. He lived not for himself but for others. His whole life was a scries of noble sacrifices and delicate attention to the interests and convenience of his friends.—Pensacola Gazette"p.352
Deaths. Army and navy chronicle, and Scientific repository, by William Quereau Force, 1836
http://books.google.com/books?id=ZKZLAAAAYAAJ&printsec=frontcover

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Ensign Francis Stribling (VA) - original U.S. Regiment of Riflemen
Ens Rifle. 3 May '08 : Sec Lt July '09 : transf. Mar.'11, to Light arty: First Lt Mar.'11: Capt 1 Nov. '13: retained, May'15, in Light arty: resigned 1 May '16.

# 42 Stribling Genealogy
http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~gazetteer2000/s/striblin/stribling_genealogy.htm

Francis Stribling Jr., born Hopewell 1787, died at "Montcalm" Loudoun Co., Va. in 1828
Stribling  and related families, by Mary Frances Stribling Moursund, 1967

nephew of? Stribling, Sigismund (Va). 2d Lieutenant 12th Virginia, 9th December, 1776; 1st Lieutenant, 10th May, 1777; regiment designated, 8th Virginia, 14th September, 1778; Captain, 26th May, 1781; retired 1st January, 1783

cousin of Dr. Francis Taliaferro Stribling - first graduate of the University of Virginia medical school; good friends of the Lees in Staunton where Dr. Stribling was superintendent of the Western Lunatic Asylum from 1840-1874, and named as one of "The original thirteen members of the Association of Medical Superintendents of American institutions for the insane, John Curwen, American Psychiatric Association, E. Cowan, 1885" vatious sources
see also
Dr. Francis T. Stribling and Moral Medicine & DOROTHEA DIX (head of the Union nurses) AND DR. FRANCIS T. STRIBLING AN INTENSE FRIENDSHIP
http://alicedaviswoodbook.com/book.htm

The Bank of the Valley v Stribling's Ex or January 1836 Richmond p.555, Virginia reports: by Thomas Johnson Michie,1903
http://books.google.com/books?id=aZ4UAAAAYAAJ&printsec=frontcover

Staunton Convention of 1816 Farmer’s Repository Charles Town September 11, 1816

relation?: Gettysburg campaign and campaigns of 1864 and 1865 in Virginia, by Robert M. stribling, Lieut Col of Artillery, C.S.A., 1905 (Captain commanding Fauquier Artillery Battery)

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Ensign Augustus L. Langham (OH) - original U.S. Regiment of Riflemen
Ens Rifle 3 May 08: resigned 15 Apr 09: Capt 19 infy, 12 Mar 12: disting in defence of Ft Meigs and in the sortie of 5 May 13: Major 10 infy 15 Aug 13: retained Dec 15 Capt 7 infy, with bvt of Major: resigned: 15 Oct 16.

The pictorial field-book of the war of 1812: or, illustrations, by pen and, by Benson John Lossing, 1868
http://books.google.com/books?id=okh7K53m_BIC&printsec=frontcover

War of 1812: Turning Point at Fort Meigs,
http://www.historynet.com/war-of-1812-turning-point-at-fort-meigs.htm/1

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Ensign John Logan (Nc) - original U.S. Regiment of Riflemen
Ens Rifle 1 July 08 resigned 1 Oct 09

Ensign William D. Jones (TN) - original U.S. Regiment of Riflemen
Ens Rifle 12 Dec 08: died 22 Aug 09, at N Orleans

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Ensign Edmund Foster (MA) - original U.S. Regiment of Riflemen
Mas Ens Rifle 12 Dec 08: resigned 1 July '09: First Lt 9 infy 12 Маг '13:
Capt Mar '18: wounded in battle of Chrystler Fields 11 Nov 13: resigned 31 Oct '14

"Brigadier General E.P Gaines to Secretary of War - report of Battle for Fort Erie August 24, 1814  - "...The detachment of Scott's gallant brigade, consisted of parts of the 9th, 11th, and 22d infantry, did ts duty in a manner worthy the high reputation the shoulder, received from one of the enemy's shells, brigade had acquired at Chippewa nnd at the falls of Niagara. The 9th under the command of captain Edmund Foster, was actively engaged against the left of the enemy, and with the aid of lieutenant Douglass' corps of bombardiers, commanding the water battery, and of that of the volunteers, under captains Broughton and Harding, effected their repulse."p. 20
Niles' weekly register, Volume 7, edited by Hezekiah Niles, 1815
http://books.google.com/books?id=wVA8AAAAIAAJ&printsec=frontcover

"6268. MAJOR EDMUND FOSTER (Edmund, Abraham, Samuel, bamuel, John), b. Littleton, Mass., Sept. 9, 1784; m., Cheshire, Mass., Dec. 3o, 1814, Sarah Brown, b. June 18, 1784; d. April 24, 186o.
Captain Foster entered the regular army prior to the war of 1812. His papers of admission were signed by Thomas Jeffei son, and those of dismissal by James Madison. He was in some of the most important battles of the war, and was a captain in the Ninth Berkshire Regiment . He had two brothers, William and Charles. The former was first lieutenant, and the other second lieutenant in different companies. Winfield Scott was captain also in the same regiment, just beginning then to enter upon that path of glory which widened in the Mexican war, and culminated in the Rebellion. Foster was wounded at Chippewa, and for bravery was breveted major. After the prisoners were quartered at Pittsfield and Cheshire, Major Foster was given charge of a cantonment in both places. This brought him frequently to this town and to the home of Capt . Daniel Brown, where quarters were given to some in the spacious garret . Here he met and married Sally, second daughter of Captain Brown, and settled in Cheshire. He died at Hoosac, N. Y. His family are scattered. Mrs. Foster died at an advanced age in Cheshire. Several grandchildren still reside here. Two daughters, Mrs. William G. Waterman and Mrs. Justus Lane, have lived for many years in Illinois. He d. Feb. 5, 1834. Res., Pittstown and Hoosac, N. Y."p. 763
Foster genealogy, Part 2, by Frederick Clifton Pierce, 1899
http://books.google.com/books?id=PolMAAAAMAAJ&printsec=frontcover

son of Reverand, Edmund Foster, "...youngest child of [Captain] Abraham (3) and Susannah (Hartshorn) Foster, was born at Reading, April 18, 1752; and died March 28, 1826. He graduated at Yale in 1779, and was ordained pastor of the church at Littleton in 1781. He was a freshman at Yale when the battle of Lexington was fought, April 19, 1775, and afterward wrote an account of the engagement. He was a minuteman and accompanied Major Brooks, subsequently governor, and took a very active part in the exciting events of that day, being close in at some of the hottest fighting, and seeing Major Pitcairn fall wounded from his horse. Resuming his studies, he completed his college course, and after his ordination was pastor of the church at Littleton from 1781 until his death in 1826, a period of forty-five years. In Drake's "History of Middlesex County," it is said of Edmund Foster: "Left an orphan when seven years old, he worked his way through Yale college. Harvard and Yale conferred honorary degrees on him." Bancroft's "History of the United States" mentions his presence at the battle of Lexington. He was a member of the Massachusetts house of representatives, 1813-14, and of the senate 1815, and of the constitutional convention of 1820. He was a conspicuous member of the last named body, of which ex-President John Adams was president, and made the closing prayer at the invitation of the presiding officer. The history of the convention contains many of his speeches. Members of the same body were Daniel Webster and Joseph Story.
Abraham and Daniel, brothers of Rev. Edmund Foster, were also soldiers of the revolution. Three of Rev. Edmund Foster's sons (Edmund, William Lawrence and Charles) were commissioned officers in the army during the war of 1812. Edmund being captain; William first lieutenant, and Charles second lieutenant in the same company, in the Ninth Regiment Infantry, under command of Colonel Winfield Scott. In the battle of Lundy's Lane, Edmund and William were wounded. It was related (by the father) that after the battle was over some one asked Charles what he thought when he saw his brothers fall. Charles' reply was: "It looked like an opening for a promotion." p. 1659
Genealogical and family history of the state of New Hampshire: a ..., Volume 4, by Lewis publishing company, Chicago, 1908
http://books.google.com/books?id=PHPLT1QY9LQC&printsec=frontcover

"PROTEST of the minority of the senate of Massachusetts against the report of the joint committee of legislature oh the governor's message To the honorable senate of Massachusetts...The undersigned, members of said senate, beg leave respectfully to object and protest against certain resolutions which were reported by a committee of the legislature and which have been adopted by the senate...particularly object of this protest provide for the appointment of twelve delegates to meet at Hartford in the state of Connecticut on the fifteenth day of December next...disappointed and ambitiou men attempt to form associations prejudicial to the general welfare and dangerous to the Union of the States That these men would excite local jealousies and attempt geographical distinctions and that despairing of governing the whole tliey would attempt a severeance that they might govern a part...our enemy would profit by our dissensions our union would be dissolved, our country conquered, and our liberty extinguished. Our country is engaged in a just and (of late) successful war...the undersigned have strong reasons to apprehend that propositions for separate peace may grow out of a proposed meeting of delegates from the New England states...the temptation of momentary gain might induce a compact with the enemy, introduce an army of foreign mercenaries, produce a civil war, which would end in a subjugation of both sections to the power of Great Uritain..."John Howe, Mark Langdon Hall, Walter Folger, Joseph Bemis, Samuel Hoar, William Moody, John Holmes, John Gage,
Edmund Foster, Daniel Killiam, M. Kinsley, Timothy Fuller, Albion K Parris. Senate Chamber, oct 15, 1814
"pp. 153-154
Niles' weekly register, Volume 7, edited by Hezekiah Niles, 1815
http://books.google.com/books?id=Z5E-AAAAYAAJ&printsec=frontcover
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Ensign James Johnson (MD)  - original U.S. Regiment of Riflemen
Ens Rifle 12 Dec 08: Sec Lt Jan 10: resigned 16 Apr 10 

relation of? Colonel James Johnson (1736-1809), Colonel 2d Battalion Frederick County Maryland Militia, January 6, 1776. p. 192
Year book by Sons of the Revolution. New York Society,1893
http://books.google.com/books?id=KCowAAAAYAAJ&printsec=frontcover

"Thus we see that five Johnsons held the most conspicuous militia stations in the State at a time when the darkest gloom hung over the destinies of America all of whom served under General Washington in the most trying time of the war the winters of 1776 and 1777 a number not equalled by any family in the State...."p.237
Army and navy chronicle, Volume 1, by Benjamin Homans,1835
http://books.google.com/books?id=JnFMAAAAYAAJ&printsec=frontcover

History of Western Maryland: being a history of Frederick ..., Volume 1, by John Thomas Scharf, Helen Long, 1862
http://books.google.com/books?id=ntVpHBIz0hAC&printsec=frontcover



----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Surgeon John Gale (NH) - postwar Rifle Regiment
Surgeon's mate, Twenty-third Infantry, July 6, 1812, and promoted to surgeon, Thirty-fourth Infantry, August 31, 1814. He was honorably discharged, on reduction. of the army, June 15, 1815; was reinstated as surgeon's mate, Third Infantry, September 13, 1815, and promoted to be surgeon, Rifle Regiment, April 18, 1818. He was appointed Major and surgeon (in the staff) June 1, 1821. He died July 27, 1830.
Dr. John Gale, married Ni-co-ma of the Iowa (tribe), his daughter Mary Gale married Joseph LaFlesche, aka Insta Maza (Iron Eye), the last chief of the Omaha.
Their daughter, Gale's grandaughter, was the noted  Susette LaFlesche "Bright Eyes" Tibbles (1854–1903):
"a well-known Native American writer, lecturer, interpreter and artist of the Omaha tribe in Nebraska. Susette LaFlesche was a progressive who was a spokesperson for Native American rights. She was of Ponca, Iowa, French and Anglo-American  ancestry. In 1983 she was inducted into the Nebraska Hall of Fame...
Early life and education
Susette, also called Insta Theamba (Bright Eyes),[1] was one of seven children born to Joseph LaFlesche, the Métis son of the French fur trader Joseph LaFlesche and his Ponca wife, Waoowinchtcha. LaFlesche, also called Insta Maza (Iron Eye), was the last chief of the Omaha. His wife Mary Gale, also called Hinnuaganun (One Woman), was the mixed-race daughter of Dr. John Gale, a surgeon at Fort Atkinson (Nebraska) and Ni-co-ma, his wife from the Iowa (tribe).[2] They were a "prominent, affluent and acculturated family".[3] As a child, the younger Joseph LaFlesche had been adopted by Big Elk, who named him successor as chief of the Omaha. LaFlesche stressed the importance of education for their children and "favored assimilation"."
- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Susette_LaFlesche_Tibbles

The Missouri Expedition, 1818-1820; the Journal of Surgeon John Gale, with Related. Documents. Edited by Roger L. Nichols. (Norman, University of Oklahoma Press, 1969)

The Army Medical Department 1818-1865 by Mary C Gillett,1987
http://books.google.com/books?id=hdu-6pn7CK8C&printsec=frontcover

On Earth's Remotest Bounds: Year One: Blood and Water by Kenneth C. Flint, 2004
"ON EARTH'S REMOTEST BOUNDS"
is the story of the far-frontier bastion called Fort Atkinson, built on the Council Bluff made famous by the Indian parley held with Lewis and Clark there in 1804. It is a saga of a fledgling, struggling nation with a most tenuous toehold on a massive territory. The fort faces threats from Indians, British, and nature itself. It is a fascinating and brutal time little chronicled, falling between the Revolution and the main westward expansion, when American attitudes, character, and policies were being shaped. It is filled with names of heroes like Riley and Leavenworth, the friends and relatives of Lewis and Clark, famed explorers like Long and Kearney, and folklore figures like Jim Bridger, Mike Fink, and Hugh Glass. "Year One: ""BLOOD and WATER" chronicles the first year of the thousand-man expedition as it battles hundreds of miles up the wild Missouri on primitive steamboats and keels to reach the bluff and build its first fort. Here the exhausted men must survive a winter plagued by severe weather, food shortages, a scurvy epidemic felling hundreds, and a devastating flood. They hang on by courage and sheer doggedness to begin a new fortress atop the high Council Bluff. Limited preview - 2004 - 348 pages
The Missouri expedition, 1818-1820;: The journal of Surgeon John Gale, with related documents (The American exploration and travel series) by John Gale, 1969

note - At the 1826 court martial of Colonel Talbot Chambers, Commander of the 1st Infantry,  a principal accuser was Capt James Gale, not to be confused with ex Rifleman Surgeon John Gale.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
John Hall, late Major in the Marine Corps,  Paymaster, Rifle regiment.
John Hall (Date of commission) 8 June, 1814, (where stationed) Mediterranean
Officers of the War of 1812 Marine Corps Officers
http://www.history.navy.mil/wars/war1812/list14.htm

Major John Ladson Hall. Born 2nd October 1775. Died Sullivan Island, Charleston 1831. He recruited the Italian musicians that formed the first US Marine Corps Band during a cruise to the Mediterranean and became the third highest ranking officer in the US Marine Corps during the War of 1812. Married 1805 Hetty Willis Broom, 'from New York', daughter to Abraham and (probably) Elizabeth Rumsey.
http://www.hillmanc.fsnet.co.uk/hall.htm 
-----------------------------------------NCOs & Enlisted------------------------------------------

there are a number of genealogy-related posts on the web pertaining to individual Riflemen bios, pension, land bounty/grant claims or warrants, etc. - too many to list - however, here are a few Riflemen entries of fuller mention and note:

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Sergeant Balthazar Kramer
Taking Care of the Men - "..the son of German immigrants, Kramer was born in Maryland about 1779. By 1797, his family had moved to New Geneva, Pennsylvania to establish a glass factory. Kramer married Elizabeth Ingles on March 2, 1800, and the couple went on to have at least 8 children together. Kramer joined the US Rifle Regiment when it was organized in 1815. He served under the command of Major William Bradford, eventually rose to the rank of Sergeant and was part of the company that established the first Fort Smith in December of 1817. Unfortunately, while ascending the Arkansas River that autumn, Kramer contracted some kind of illness. The records from the first Fort Smith indicate that he was hospitalized almost immediately, and although the term for which Kramer had enlisted expired in 1819, he could not return home. The army discharged him on April 12 of that year, but because he was ill and completely disabled, he was allowed to remain at the post. Major Bradford wrote a letter to his superiors in the War Department explaining the situation. He said that he refused to let Kramer leave the post to suffer and starve. He also stated that the infirmity did not derive from “old age or from intemperance, but [that Kramer] was unable to earn [a] living from unavoidable exposure and fatigue while in the line of...duty as [a soldier] in the army of the United States.” Bradford’s opinion was that Kramer was “as much entitled to the bounty of the government as if [he] had lost a leg or an arm in battle.” Bradford’s support did little to improve Kramer’s situation. On October 12, 1822, he wrote to his wife that he was not getting any better. His one wish was to see her and the children again, but misfortune had made that impossible. The bank was broke and he had no hopes of getting any money. He explained that he had sent money enough to hire a man to take him to the mouth of the Arkansas but the water was too low for boats to travel on the river. Sergeant Kramer died at the post on December 5, 1823 without ever being able to return home. The recorded cause of his death was arthritis. As late as 1854 his widow Elizabeth was still trying to obtain a pension from the US government." Living The Legacy - Soldier at the First Fort Smith

Peter Caulder - 3rd Rifle regiment - postwar Rifle regiment
"...was born to free black, landowning parents in Marion County, South Carolina, in 1795. Billy D. Higgins carefully follows Caulder's life for the next fifty-five years, arguing that his subject's experiences show an antebellum South in which racial boundaries remained blurred at least into the 1850s. 1 The story begins with Caulder's service in a South Carolina militia company in the War of 1812, joining as a substitute for one of his white neighbors. Caulder later joined the Third Rifle Regiment of the United States Army as a pioneer, left his native state for good, and by 1817 found himself with his regiment at the future site of Fort Smith, Arkansas, along the Indian frontier. Here he became a scout and participated in numerous expeditions into the west, including one by noted explorer Stephen Long that explored the area between Fort Smith and the Red River. While at Fort Smith he also acquired various skills, including the construction of chimneys and canoes. Caulder left the army in 1824 and laid claim to land in Arkansas as a bounty for his service in 1812. The land proved virtually uninhabitable, however, and he returned to the army for another five years, then deserted and ran away to the mountainous White River country of Arkansas, where the army never found him. Higgins sees race as being of little importance in Caulder's military experiences, concluding that his duties differed little from those of whites in his unit. As a scout his race became invisible..." - Review of Billy D. Higgins. A Stranger and a Sojourner: Peter Caulder, Free Black Frontiersman in Antebellum Arkansas. Fayetteville: University of Arkansas Press. 2004. Pp. xviii, 349.

Chapter Two Rifleman in "A Stranger And a Sojourner: Peter Caulder, Free Black Frontiersman" several factual errors (example: [Thomas A.} Smith transferred from an aretillery unit into the Third Rifles in 1808", p 37 there was no Third Rifles in 1808) but interesting vignettes.

A Stranger And a Sojourner: Peter Caulder, Free Black Frontiersman - Billy D. Higgins
The extraordinary story of a pioneering African-American community leader is now told. After serving in the War of 1812, Peter Caulder, a free African-American settler in the Arkansas territory, has his life turned upside down on the eve of the Civil War.Limited preview - 2005 - 349 pages

Peter Caulder (1795?–1861? - Encyclopedia of Arkansas History & Culture

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Charles (Cootware) Courtois
"...transferred to the Fourth US Rifles.] On a deposition he signed for a pension application, he stated that his real name was Charles Courtois, but it was written as Charles Cortwite because the American officers wrote it as it was pronounced.
On September 17, 1814, Charles was reported missing at the battle at Fort Erie in Upper Canada. He stated on a pension application that he was wounded by a musket ball that shattered his left ankle. He was left on the battle field and afterwards taken prisoner by the British. His left leg was amputated four inches below the knee at the British camp. He was held prisoner by the British until March 26, 1815 when he was released. He was present on a Roll in Buffalo, New York on April 30, 1815 and was discharged at Plattsburg on May 26, 1815.

THE SIEGE AT FORT ERIE..."
(continues with a good short narrative of the battle and 1st and 4th U.S. Rifles involvement.)
post also at http://genforum.genealogy.com/cgi-bin/print.cgi?cootware::20.html


-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


James Hamilton
short review of The Life and Dying Confessions of James Hamilton, Executed for the Murder of Major Benjamin Birdsall, Nov. 6, 1818, Albany

Capt. Benjamin Birdsall, US 4th Rifle Regiment - query and RG response

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Anthony Wells - 3rd Rifle Regiment and post-war Rifle Regiment
"enlisted for five years, discharged at Cantonment Martin Sep 20th, 1819, but present for roll call on Dec 31, 1819..." - see short narrative and mention of Captain Wylie Martin


-------------------------------------------1815 & 1820 ----------------------------------------------------



Postwar Rifle regiment - first officer listing as of 1815
RIFLE REGIMENT
Colonel Th. A. Smith 6 July, 12 - B.g. brevet 24 Jan 14
Lieutenant Colonel
W. S. Hamilton 21 Feb 1814
Major
Talbot Chambers 21 Feb 1814 - Lt col brvt 17 Sep 14
Captains
Willoughby Morgan 6 July 1812 - Maj. brvt 26 June 13 , Joseph Selden 6 do[ditto above] - Maj. brvt 21 Feb 14, lt col. bvt 1 may 15, Wm Bradford 6 do - Maj. brvt 20 Aug. 14, Jos Kean 17 Mar 1814,
Benj Birdsall 17 do, Jno O'Fallan 17 do - Maj. brvt 15 Aug. 14, Henry V. Swearengen 11 May 1814, Edmund Shipp 26 do, W.L. Dufphey 12 Aug 1814, C.A. Trimble 20 Aug 1814
First Lieutenants
Louis Laval 28 July 1813, J. Calhoun, jr 24 Jan 1814, J.H. Ballard 17 Mar 1814,
E.I. Langham 17 Mar 1814, Lewellan Hickman 17 Mar 1814, Stoughton Gantt 17 do, J. M'Gunnegle 28 Apr 1814, David B Stith 1 Sep 1814, Saml V. Hamilton 17 Sep 1814, Jn Heddleston 30 do
Second Lieutenants
W Armstrong 24 Jan 14, WJ Gordon 17 Mar 14, Th Griffith 17 do, John Hoilingsworth 26 Mar 14,
Bennet Riley 15 Apr 14, W.N. Bryan 25 do, W. Markle jr 29 do, James S Gray 11 May 14, Chs. L. Harrison 26 do, Overton W Crockett 30 Sep 14
Surgeon Lewis L Near 17 Mar 14
Surgeon's Mates Saml. P. Hugo 12 Mar 12
Wm H. Henning 20 Apr 14


The following article, viewable at google books including text and pdf format, offers a rare glimpse of the postwar Rifle Regiment officer corps in 1819:
Report Of Inspection Of The Ninth Military Department, 1819 pp. 261-274 - Mississippi Valley Historical Association, 1921

Postwar Rifle Regiment - "last roll call" (officer) as of Army Register 1820
Rifle Regiment
Colonel Talb't Chambers 10 Nov 18
Lieutenant Colonel Will by Morgan 10 Nov 18
Major Wm. Bradford 10 Nov 18 - Brvt. 20 Aug. 14.
Captains Thos Biddle 6 July 12 - Maj. brvt. 15, W. Martin 17 Mar. 14 - Aug.14., Mat J. Magee 10 Feb. 15, J.H. Ballard 22 Apr 17, J. M'Gunnegle 12 July 18 - ADQMG, Wm Armstrong 31 do, Bennet Riley 6 Aug., James S Gray 10 Nov., T.F. Smith 25 Apr. 19, T.F. Hunt 20 May 20 - ADQMG,
First Lieutenants W.S. Blair 15 July 17, John Gantt 5 Apr. 18, Gab. Field 15 do,
C. Pentland 31 July - Adjutant, Thos. W. Kavanaugh 10 Nov, L. Palmer 10 do, Martin Scott 2 Nov. 19 - Qr master, Sam. Shannon 23 Feb. 20, Gideon Lowe 15 Mar. - ACS, Daniel Keith 20 May,
Second Lieutenants W.D. M'Cray 3 Feb 19., J Edmondson 22 Mar., John Duncan 4 Dec. 19, John Clark 28 Jan. 20, Stephen Shea 28 do, Jno. H. Winder 1 July, Wharton Rector 12 do, G.D. Snyder 13 Oct., W. Thompson 27 do, Rd Wells 27 Oct. 20, Paymaster
T Biddle 7 Aug. 20
Surgeon John Gale 18 Apr. 18
Surgeon's Mates.
[None listed]
 
A Compilation of Registers of the Army of the United States, from 1815 to 1837...by William A. Gordon, 1837
http://books.google.com/books?id=XIcFAAAAMAAJ&printsec=frontcover

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

THE WEEKLY REGISTER SATURDAY FEBRUARY 26, 1814 , Niles' weekly register, Volume 5, p. 425
http://books.google.com/books?id=r68RAAAAYAAJ&printsec=frontcover
"Washington February General orbers The president of the States has been pleased by and with the advice consent of the senate to make the following appointmentsin the army of the United States viz

Anthony Butler lieutenant colonel of the regiment of infantry to be colonel of the 2d of riflemen
George Croghan, major in the 17th regimertt infantry, lieutenant-colonel by brevet, to be lieutenant-colonel in the 2d regiment riflemen. .
David Gwynne, captain in the 19th regiment of infantry, to be major in the 2d regiment of riflemen.
William H. Pulhuff, captain in the 26th regiment of infantry, to be major in the 2d regt. riflemen.
William King, major in the 16th regiment of infantry, to be colonel in the 3d regiment of riflemen.
William S. Hamilton, major in the 10th regiment of infantry, to be lieutenant colonel of the 3d regiment of riflemen.
Walter H. Overton, captain in the 7th regiment of infantry, to be major in the 3d regiment of riflemen.
Joseph Selden, captain in the 2d regiment of light dragoons, to be major in the 3d regiment of riflemen.
James Gibson, captain in the regiment of light artillery, and colonel by brevet, to be colonel of the 4th regiment of riflemen.
Josiah Snelling, inspector general, major by brevet, and captain in the 4th regiment of infantry, to be lieutenant-colonel of the 4th rifle regiment.
Talbot Chambers, capt in the 5th regiment of infantry, to be major in the 4th rifle regiment.
Daniel Turney, of Ohio, to be regimental surgeon in the 2d rifle regiment.
By order, J. B. WALBACH."

NILES WEEKLY REGISTER SATURDAY, MAY 3, 1817, p.160
http://books.google.com/books?id=iGWf5Ity1eAC&printsec=frontcover

Rifle Regiment

Brevet lieutenant colonel Talbot Chambers to be lieutenant colonel 8th March, 1817, vice Hamilton, resigned

Brevet major Willoughby Morgan captain to be major 8th March, 1817, vice Chambers, promoted

*1st Lieutenant James S M'Intosh, to be captain 8th March, 1817, vice Morgan, promoted

2d Lieutenant Abner Harrison to be 1st lieutenant 1st March, 1817, vice Laval, resigned

2d Lieutenant John Hollingsworth to be 1st lieutenant 8th March, 1817, vice M'Intosh, promoted

*2d Lieutenant Bennet Riley to be 1st lieutenant 31st March, 1817, vice Heddleston resigned


for more on these two rifle officers - see

Noted ex-Riflemen in the Mexican War - segue into the CIVIL WAR and US Sharpshooters


back to blog post
Rifle Regiments 1808-1821



recommended for genealogists - surname lists from wars of the US up to the Civil War - Dennis Segelquist's Blog

The United States Rifle Regiment Of The War Of 1812 - Tuesday, January 06, 2009

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Tribute
 * Dr Roger L Nichols,  Professor of History at the University of Arizona, is a noted historian of numerous books and articles: concerning Fort Atkinson they include:

Books:
The Missouri Expedition, 1818-1820. University of Oklahoma Press, 1969.
General Henry Atkinson: A Western Military Career. University of Oklahoma Press, 1965. Paperback, 1972.
Stephen Long and American Frontier Exploration. University of Oklahoma Press, 1995,
University of Delaware Press, 1980.

Articles:
“General Atkinson’s Report of the Yellowstone Expedition, 1825,” Nebraska History, 44. June, 1963. 65-82.
“The Founding of Fort Atkinson,” Annals of Iowa, 37. Spring, 1965, 589-97.
“Scurvy at Cantonment Missouri,” Nebraska History, 49. Winter, 1968, 333-47.
“The Camp Missouri-Chariton Road, 1819: The Journal of Lt. Gabriel Field,” Bulletin of the Missouri Historical Society, 24. January, 1968, 139-52.
“Martin Cantonment and American Expansion in the Missouri Valley,” Missouri Historical Review, 64, October 1969, 1-17.
“Army Contributions to River Transportation,” Military Affairs, 33, April 1969, 242-49.
“Stephen Long and Scientific Exploration of the Plains,” Nebraska History, 52, Spring, 1971, 50-64.
“The Army and the Indians 1800-1830—A Reappraisal: The Missouri Valley Example,” Pacific Historical Review, 41. May, 1972, 51-68. Received the Louis K. Koontz Prize, 1973. Reprinted in The International Library of Essays in Military History. Ashgate Publishing Ltd, 2005.
“The Army and Early Perceptions of the Plains,” Nebraska History, 56, Spring, 1975, 121-35.
“The Impact of the Military on the Frontier,” pp. 110-15 in James P. Tate, ed.,
The American Military on the Frontier. Office of Air Force History, 1978.
“Backdrop for Disaster: The Arikara War of 1823,” South Dakota History, 14 Summer, 1984, 93-113.
“From the Revolution to the Mexican War,” Chapter V in Robin Higham &Donald R. Mrozek, eds., A Guide to the Sources of U.S. Military History:Supplement IV. Archon Books, 1998.
“The Army and the Indians, 1800-1830: A Reappraisal,” reprinted in Jeremy Black and Samuel Watson, eds., Warfare in the USA 1775-1861, International Library of
Essays in Military History, Ashgate, London, 2005, 249-266.
“Stephen H. Long,” Chapter 1 in Paul Hutton and Durwood Ball, eds.,Soldiers West, 2nd ed., University of Oklahoma Press, 2009.
“Indian Wars in the East, 1783-1859,” in James C. Bradford, ed., A Companion to American Military History, Blackwell Publishing, 2009, in press.


Scholarly Papers, Commentary, & Lectures:
*Address, “The Army and Opening Frontier Nebraska,” Nebraska State Centennial, 1967.
Paper, “Stephen Long and American Plains Exploration.” Western History Association,1968.
Paper, “The Army and Indian Affairs in the Missouri Valley.” Missouri Valley History Conference, 1970.
Paper, “Western Racial Attitudes Toward the Indians.” Organization of American Historians, 1971.
Paper, “The U.S. Army and Early Perceptions of the Plains.” Images of the Plains Conference, 1973.
http://history.arizona.edu/faculty/nicholscv.pdf



----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Historical sketches of the late war, between the United States and Great Britain,  By John Lewis Thomson,Published by Thomas Desilver., 1817
http://books.google.com/books?id=GpRPAAAAYAA


A Compilation of Registers of the Army of the United States, from 1815 to 1837...by William A. Gordon, 1837
http://books.google.com/books?id=XIcFAAAAMAAJ


A Dictionary of All Officers, who Have Been Commissioned,...1789-1859, by Charles Kitchell Gardner - United States - 1853
http://books.google.com/books?id=GJNLAAAAMAAJ


List of officers of the army of the United States from 1779 to 1900, by William Henry Powell, 1900
http://books.google.com/books?id=KogDAAAAYAAJ&printsec=frontcover


Historical Register of the United States Army: From Its Organization...1789-1889, by Francis Bernard Heitman
http://books.google.com/books?id=XIcFAAAAMAAJ


American military leaders: from colonial times to the present, 2 Volumes, by John C. Fredriksen, ABC-CLIO, 1999
http://books.google.com/books?id=-7MwvwL5UR0C


America's military adversaries: from colonial times to the present, by John C. Fredriksen, ABC-CLIO, 2001
http://books.google.com/books?id=ZJlm7AQK-T4C&printsec=frontcover



Encyclopedia of the War Of 1812, by David Stephen Heidler, Jeanne T. Heidler, Naval Institute Press, 2004
http://books.google.com/books?id=_c09EJgek50C 


Historical Dictionary of the War Of 1812, by Robert Malcomson, Scarecrow Press, Jan 30, 2006
http://books.google.com/books?id=DRqpoBEEoloC



The United States Army in the War of 1812: concise biographies of commanders and operational histories of regiments, with bibliographies of published and primary, by John C. Fredriksen, Richard V. Barbuto, McFarland & Co., Jul 7, 2009
http://books.google.com/books?id=3ncrAQAAIAAJ



The War of 1812 in Person: Fifteen Accounts by United States Army Regulars, Volunteers and Militiamen, by John C. Fredriksen, McFarland, Mar 8, 2010
http://books.google.com/books?id=kR7ONfMOeg4C



----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

No comments:

profile